HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Homeroast economics (8 msgs / 137 lines)
1) From: Les
One of my fellow chaplains and I eat lunch together almost every day.  We
can have our meals deducted from our paychecks.  We usually eat about the
same meal and the charges are usually within less than 25 cents of each
other.  The only difference is Jim orders an iced coffee every day for his
break.  We were shooting the breeze and I asked Jim what his cafeteria
charge was.  Bottom line, he has spent about $1,200.00 this year on those
lousy drinks.  Half the time he doesn't even finish them because according
to him they seem to get "bitter" about half way down.
Les

2) From: Sheila Quinn
Wow - what a waste. I'm just imagining how many pounds of quality greens 
I could get from SMs for $1,200!!! :o
Sheila
Les wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Les
Shelia,
I was thinking greens, Mazzer Kony, new espresso machine, etc.  The old
saying give a man a fish (espresso) and he will eat (drink)  for a day,
teach him how to fish (roast etc.) he will eat (enjoy wonderful elixir) for
a lifetime.
Les
On 11/10/06, Sheila Quinn  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Sharon Allsup
I figure a pound of roasted beans costs me between $7.10 and $8.30 per pound.
$30-36  Six pounds of superb green beans at $5-6/lb
$4.50  Shipping for those six pounds of greens (1/2 a Harvey box)
$1  Electricity to roast it all  (7.59cents/kwh here)
Post-roast weight loss brings that six pounds down to about five
pounds.  So, I've paid $35.50-$41.50 for five pounds of fantastic
coffee.
Prices for "gourmet" coffee locally run $10-20/lb at the coffee cafes,
and $8-15/lb at the grocery store.  The grocery store gourmet stuff
ain't gourmet by any means.  The coffee cafe stuff is generally
fresher roasted and higher quality beans.
But it's STILL cheaper to roast than buy beans from the cafe.  AND I
get to have different types every day of the week without having to
buy 7 pounds of roasted coffee and then have 'em go stale before being
used ...
I know, reaching to the choir here ... Man, $1,200 for coffee.  I'd
buy a gram scale just for the coffee so I'm not always stealing and
re-clamping the one I use to weigh my falcon on.  I'd buy a Hottop
because I've always wanted to try drum roasting style.  There'd still
be more than enough left over to pay for some rewiring and reventing
in the kitchen to let me roast on the stove under the hood without
having to string extension cords across the counter ...
It's about time we upgraded the cabinet that the green beans sit in,
that'd probably finish off the $1,200.  :)
-Sharon

5) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
A one word solution, Thermos.
<Snip>
for a lifetime.
Teach a man to fish and he will be out in a boat drinking beer all day.
--

6) From: Alchemist John
At 05:08 11/11/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
A one phrase response. Cooked coffee.
<Snip>
And as for fish espresso, er, um, thanks no.  (but I did do an 
espresso brined smoked catfish last year.)
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

7) From: Eddie Dove
John,
And as for fish espresso, er, um, thanks no.  (but I did do an espresso
brined smoked catfish last year.)
I am really curious how that turned out ...
Eddie
On 11/11/06, Alchemist John  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Alchemist John
Honesty time.  It was ok, but slightly bitter in a bad way.  I make 
that distinction as I am a fan and appreciate bitter in a good 
way.  The espresso itself was not bitter, but something in the 
smoking process altered the flavor compounds chemically and it went 
bitter.  It was part of a whole "test" I did, and my control group of 
brined and smoked had no bitterness.
Coffee crusted I think would be much better next time.
At 07:12 11/11/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/


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