HomeRoast Digest


Topic: INPUT: Single Cup of Coffee (18 msgs / 656 lines)
1) From: Eddie Dove
Fellow Coffee Lovers,
Recently, I purchased (at a Hardware Store) a plastic, # 2, one-cup Melitta
pour over with paper filters.  Whenever I want a single cup of coffee,
especially a decaf in the evening, this works great.  I have seen other
setups (ceramic cone, different Swissgold configurations, etc.) but do not
have them and have not tried them.  I am not asking about the Aeropress as I
have one coming; it and the KitchenAid Pro Line are going to the office.  I
also have a Mazzer Mini coming, which will be my new home grinder.  It
appears that UPS is timing the delivery of both to coincide with me having
my tonsils out this week; that way I can just look at both of them
wantingly.  I am looking for the perfect setup for a single cup of coffee in
the pour over fashion.  All input is appreciated.
Thanks folks,
Eddie

2) From: Jeff Oien
Eddie Dove wrote:
<Snip>
I like the Swiss Gold One Cup which Sweet Maria's sells. It would
be the same as a good coffee machine with a Swiss Gold filter. It's
not quite as "transparent" as a French Press but doesn't mask flavor
like a paper filter would. I've thought about trying to find a small
Cory vac pot for one cup use but I like my Swiss Gold so much I'm not
going to mess with anything else. Very easy clean up too.
JeffO

3) From: Eddie Dove
Thank you, Jeff.
Eddie
On 11/12/06, Jeff Oien  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Claus Thøgersen
Hi,
Interestingly I thought I wanted a Swissgold one cup brewer but see what it 
says on the SM page:
Please note: We have decided to stop stocking the Swissgold KF-300 because 
we feel the Aeropress makes a better single cup of coffee. We have kept the 
review
because it still works well and will be a good option for some folks - we 
just feel that the Aeropress is a bit better as a single cup brewer.Maria & 
Tom
so more space for greens in my upcoming international order since I also 
already own the  AP.
Claus Thøgersen
----- Oprindelig meddelelse ----- 
Fra: "Eddie Dove" 
Til: 
Sendt: 12. november 2006 23:01
Emne: +INPUT: Single Cup of Coffee
<Snip>

5) From: Sheila Quinn
I have one of those, too, but I rarely use it anymore. I prefer my small 
press pot. The problem with the pourover is that the water starts to 
cool off right away before you are done using it. (You'll have to refill 
it a couple of times to fill your cup.) Also watch the grind because if 
you grind too fine, the drip will stall.
Sheila
Eddie Dove wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Jon Rosen
I have an Aeropress and I'm not all that pleased with it. I haven't  
been able to get what I perceive as a full, rich cup of coffee with  
it. It seems to need at 50% more coffee grinds than a press pot or  
drip. Finally, it's not the end of the world, but if you do it their  
way, you need to measure the temperature of the water fairly  
precisely. I'll give it another try, but I haven't been impressed.
Jon
On Nov 12, 2006, at 9:51 PM, Sheila Quinn wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Larry English
I usually use the Aeropress at home, where I have a Rocky to grind, but for
travel I always take the SwissGold 1-cup with a Traveller II for grinding.
The latter combo packs easily and requires less coffee - about 50-60% as
much as Aeropress.  The two methods brew different styles of coffee, and I
like both.  I don't use cooler water in the Aeropress but do adjust the
grind and time to get a nice rich cup.
Cleanup with Aeropress is very nice.  I just use the paper filters that came
with Aeropress; and the plunger isn't getting worn, though some report that
problem.
Larry
On 11/12/06, Jon Rosen  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Jon Rosen
--Apple-Mail-14-399870975
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
Out of curiosity, what type of grind and time do you use with the  
Aeropress?
Thanks,
Jon
On Nov 12, 2006, at 10:51 PM, Larry English wrote:
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-14-399870975
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Out of curiosity, what type of =
grind and time do you use with the Aeropress?
Thanks,
Jon O= n Nov 12, 2006, at 10:51 PM, Larry English wrote:
I usually = use the Aeropress at home, where I have a Rocky to grind, but for travel = I always take the SwissGold 1-cup with a Traveller II for grinding.  = The latter combo packs easily and requires less coffee - about 50-60% as = much as Aeropress.  The two methods brew different styles of coffee, = and I like both.  I don't use cooler water in the Aeropress but do = adjust the grind and time to get a nice rich cup.  Cleanup with = Aeropress is very nice.  I just use the paper filters that came with = Aeropress; and the plunger isn't getting worn, though some report that = problem.  Larry On = 11/12/06, Jon Rosen <jon> = wrote: I have an Aeropress and I'm not all that pleased with it. I = haven't been able to get what I perceive as a full, rich cup of = coffee with it. It seems to need at 50% more coffee grinds than a = press pot or drip. Finally, it's not the end of the world, but if you = do it their way, you need to measure the temperature of the water = fairly precisely. I'll give it another try, but I haven't been = impressed. Jon On Nov 12, 2006, at 9:51 PM, Sheila Quinn = wrote: > I have one of those, too, but I rarely use it = anymore. I prefer my > small press pot. The problem with the = pourover is that the water > starts to cool off right away before = you are done using it. (You'll > have to refill it a couple of = times to fill your cup.) Also watch > the grind because if you = grind too fine, the drip will stall. > > = Sheila > > > > > Eddie Dove = wrote: >> Fellow Coffee Lovers, >> >> = Recently, I purchased (at a Hardware Store) a plastic, # 2, one- = >> cup Melitta pour over with paper filters.  Whenever I = want a >> single cup of coffee, especially a decaf in the = evening, this >> works great.  I have seen other setups = (ceramic cone, different >> Swissgold configurations, etc.) = but do not have them and have not >> tried them.  I am not = asking about the Aeropress as I have one >> coming; it and the = KitchenAid Pro Line are going to the office.  I >> also = have a Mazzer Mini coming, which will be my new home >> = grinder.  It appears that UPS is timing the delivery of both = to >> coincide with me having my tonsils out this week; that = way I can >> just look at both of them wantingly.  I am = looking for the perfect >> setup for a single cup of coffee in = the pour over fashion.  All >> input is = appreciated. >> >> Thanks folks, = >> >> Eddie > = > homeroast = mailing list > http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast > To change = your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, > = unsvbscribes) go to http://sweetmarias.com/> = maillistinfo.html#personalsettings= homeroast mailing list http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To change your = personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to = http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = --Apple-Mail-14-399870975--

9) From: Scott Marquardt
There's nothing magical about the Aeropress, so don't feel that the
instructions are at all necessary. Use your experience to suggest variable
values that might do better for you.
I'd suggest using conventional temperatures for water, and completely
disregard the water amounts in the instructions. For a 6 oz. pour with 10
grams of grind, fill the Aero to the bottom of the "3" oval with water.
Try a finer grind, unless you're getting over-extraction. Dittos for the
duration.
To get a richer cup, you'll need to use polyester or a metal filter. Paper
will get you clarity.
- Scott
On 11/12/06, Jon Rosen  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Scott Marquardt
Ignore the instructions for water quantity. Treble or quadruple the water
amount. You'll find the Aeropress uses no more grind, used this way, than
other coffee devices.
Extraction is going to be less efficient if the solution the grinds are
steeping in is already concentrated. By using much more water, you're
keeping the solution well below a concentration that impedes extraction.
In short, anyone who wants an "Aerocano" does better by just brewing the
entire cup in the press itself, than by pressing a concentrate and then
topping it off with water.
My two cents.
- Scott
On 11/12/06, Larry English  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-151-414374289
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
This is my travel fallback, and the one my singing partner uses to  
brew her flavored coffee.  When all else fails, I know it'll give me  
a decent cup, albeit slightly less eco-friendly than either french  
press or Aeropress (and with a little less mess than the latter, but  
not much).
On Nov 12, 2006, at 4:01 PM, Eddie Dove wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-151-414374289
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
This is my travel fallback, and =
the one my singing partner uses to brew her flavored coffee.  When all =
else fails, I know it'll give me a decent cup, albeit slightly less =
eco-friendly than either french press or Aeropress (and with a little =
less mess than the latter, but not much).
On Nov 12, 2006, =
at 4:01 PM, Eddie Dove wrote:
Fellow = Coffee Lovers, Recently, I purchased (at a Hardware Store) a = plastic, # 2, one-cup Melitta pour over with paper filters.  Whenever = I want a single cup of coffee, especially a decaf in the evening, this = works great.  I have seen other setups (ceramic cone, different = Swissgold configurations, etc.) but do not have them and have not tried = them.  I am not asking about the Aeropress as I have one coming; it = and the KitchenAid Pro Line are going to the office.  I also have a = Mazzer Mini coming, which will be my new home grinder.  It appears = that UPS is timing the delivery of both to coincide with me having my = tonsils out this week; that way I can just look at both of them = wantingly.  I am looking for the perfect setup for a single cup of = coffee in the pour over fashion.  All input is appreciated. = Thanks folks, Eddie Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-151-414374289--

12) From: Jon Rosen
--Apple-Mail-16-441911335
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
Scott,
I increased the water and used a coarser grind with a longer steeping  
time and got pretty good results. I'm encouraged enough to start  
using the Aeropress again to see if I can get that "truly great cup"  
of coffee with it.
Thanks,
Jon
On Nov 13, 2006, at 1:37 AM, Scott Marquardt wrote:
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-16-441911335
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Scott,
I increased the water and = used a coarser grind with a longer steeping time and got pretty good = results. I'm encouraged enough to start using the Aeropress again to see = if I can get that "truly great cup" of coffee with it.
Thanks,
Jon O= n Nov 13, 2006, at 1:37 AM, Scott Marquardt wrote:
Ignore = the instructions for water quantity. Treble or quadruple the water = amount. You'll find the Aeropress uses no more grind, used this way, = than other coffee devices.   Extraction is going = to be less efficient if the solution the grinds are steeping in is = already concentrated. By using much more water, you're keeping the = solution well below a concentration that impedes extraction. =   In short, anyone who wants an "Aerocano" does better = by just brewing the entire cup in the press itself, than by pressing a = concentrate and then topping it off with water.   = My two cents.   - Scott   = On 11/12/06, Larry English <larrylenglish> = wrote: I usually = use the Aeropress at home, where I have a Rocky to grind, but for travel = I always take the SwissGold 1-cup with a Traveller II for grinding.  = The latter combo packs easily and requires less coffee - about 50-60% as = much as Aeropress.  The two methods brew different styles of coffee, = and I like both.  I don't use cooler water in the Aeropress but do = adjust the grind and time to get a nice rich cup.  Cleanup with = Aeropress is very nice.  I just use the paper filters that came with = Aeropress; and the plunger isn't getting worn, though some report that = problem.  Larry = = --Apple-Mail-16-441911335--

13) From: jerry walker
I would have to disagree, i use 2 scoops of beans fill to the top of the 2 oval with water heated to 190 for a aerocano, press that thru then top off 1 to 1 with just off boil water, this is the best coffe i have ever tasted, i have a air pot at work with a bodum electric kettle  thermos filtercone holder and filtropa filters for pourover for my coworkers as the aeropressing was burning me out, and the pourover is better than any drip i have tried, but still not as in the same league as the aerocano prepared as above

14) From: Tom Bellhouse
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Scott,
I'm making mug-at-a-time with the Aeropress.  It took me about 4 days =
learning to make a cup that excells the first one out of my FP, but I =
think I've gotten there (at least for my tastebuds.)
Use 1 Aeropress scoop of beans.  Note that the Aeropress scoop is a bit =
larger than the standard coffee scoop.
Fill to the bottom of the 2 oval with conventionally hot water.
Stir with the Aeropress paddle.
Press into the mug.  It will NOT make a full cup.
Top off with conventionally hot water, stir and enjoy.  Every cup is the =
"first" cup.
Tom in GA

15) From: jerry walker
Tom, that would prob equate to the top of the 2 oval with 2 scoops with my method either way i agree that the aeropress is hard to beat for a single cup americano

16) From: Scott Marquardt
I'm not sure you're disagreeing. I wouldn't argue that using an Aeropress in
a stock way results in inferior brew from the device. But it certainly
results in use of more coffee. This is inevitable given the lower extraction
efficiency that comes from using less water.
You can obtain the same flavors as you're obtaining by using more water in
the press, but by pressing much sooner. What you're getting is
under-extraction. Nothing wrong with that -- Alan Adler explicitly states
that's one reason its brew tastes so good.
Coffee experts generally agree that the best flavors in coffee are extracted
during the first third of an extraction. But coffee experts also agree that
stopping there will also result in a less complex cup. This is certainly an
issue of taste, and I won't disagree with you on that.
- S
On 11/13/06, jerry walker  wrote:
<Snip>

17) From: jerry walker
When you say pressing sooner how so ?  The conventional way I usually just stir with the paddle 10 to 15 sec and push 10 to 15 per scoop, i usually heat the water to 175 for straight shots but go to 190 for aerocano, i just tried your inverted method with the aero filters not sure i did it right as when i turned it onto the cup to push it appeared that the bloom was back on top, but i really liked  it.  I am going to give it a whirl again, i dont think i waited to see the bloom coming through the cap, if i use 2 scoops of beans are you saying to use more than to the top of the 2 oval of water or just whatever it takes to bring the slurry up into cap filter level, stir alittle then invert back onto cup then push?
thanks  Jerry

18) From: Scott Marquardt
Just use more water.
But this will be more efficient extraction, so to get the same extraction
level you'll need to adjust some other variable -- a bit finer grind, cooler
water, shorter time, take your pick.
Use of the polyester changes the character of the cup. It's a bit "dirtier,"
and lets you get the oils if you go with inversion. Try it conventionally as
well -- without inversion. You definitely need more water then, 'cause
you'll get more washthough unless you go quite a bit finer with the grind
(which you can do, 'cause the poly won't stall as soon).
Also, try the poly in both directions -- seared side down and seared side
up. Pressing performance seems to vary a bit; I'd be interested in hearing
of your experience both ways.
The key thing is that if you already have an extraction level you really
like, you want to adapt your press with the poly to obtain that same
extraction, while gaining the different character of the cup. Two very
different issues. If you get an extraction you don't like (whether over or
under), you don't want to confuse that with the different character of the
cup (which you may or may not prefer). Vary your variables in order to
retain parity of extraction; then you'll be able to judge whether a poly cup
is better or worse to your taste than a paper cup.
It's all about the variables. If a cup doesn't turn out a certain way, look
at how you prepared it and see which of the variables can be brought in a
direction that will move the extraction in the direction you want.
If a cup is under-extracted but your grind is as fine as it can be, you'd
want to go with more time, more water (if possible), or hotter water. If
your cup is over-extracted and your grind is as coarse as it can possibly
be, you need to go with less time or cooler water.
For the most part, you can trade variables off against each other.
The two variables that are the greatest determinants of extraction
efficiency are grind and water temperature. Extraction can vary DRAMATICALLY
as these vary.
Introducing a filter (such as polyester) to a familiar routine with the
Aeropress can be disconcerting, because the flow rate of the poly changes
things in subtle ways. But just remember there's nothing magic about it, and
constantly be aware of the variables!
Argh, I'm preachin'
- S
On 11/13/06, jerry walker  wrote:
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest