HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Cold Brew and rest time question (9 msgs / 427 lines)
1) From: Dave Ehrenkranz
Long ago (25 yrs?) my wife and I switched to cold "brew"  
concentrates. For probably the last decade I have been doing fresh  
brews but my wife still prefers her cold "brew." This afternoon I am  
roasting, grinding, and then will cold "brew" my wife some  
concentrate. I am curious is resting the bean before actually  
"brewing" it makes any difference. I suspect it doesn't make as much  
difference as it does with fresh brewing but I am not sure.
For those of you who are not aware of the cold "brew" process I have  
outlined it below:
1) Take roasted (~1/2 LB) beans and do a coarse grind (needs to be  
coarse or else it will clog the filter).
2) Soak beans in about a quart of room temperature water for 1 day (I  
commonly do overnight). We bought a "toddy" unit probably 25 yrs ago  
and it comes with a thick filter pad which sits in the bottom of the  
toddy with a rubber stopper in hole on the bottom.
3) remove stopper from hole, sit toddy on a jar, and collect the  
coffee concentrate in jar.
4) Store concentrate in frig and use when desired.
To use:
1) use about a 1/2 - 1 inch of concentrate to a cup of coffee and add  
hot water. Of course you can adjust the strength by adding more or  
less concentrate.
Beware the coffee is EXTREMELY smooth and mellow but has all the  
caffeine. I find it lacks the aromas and tastes one gets from freshly  
brewed.
A few years ago our chinese daughter-in-law decided to make her own  
cup of iced coffee from my wife's concentrate. She didn't realize how  
little concentrate one should use and basically used it straight. She  
did this in the morning before we all drove to some friends home in  
the Olympic Peninsula. Early the next morning we found her awake  
sitting in the living room. We thought our son and her had a fight  
but NO she just couldn't get to sleep. That is when we realized what  
she had done.

2) From: Scott Marquardt
There's been talk of the CO2 in freshly roasted beans possibly imparting
some flavors to the cup, but I'm not sure anything's certain on that.
However, if there's anything to it, the effect would be exacerbated with
cold brew because unlike solids, gases are better soluble at lower
temperatures. Therefore, you'd get more dissolved CO2 in your cold brew,
than if you did it hot.
This might be all the more true because a very hot brew will outgas fast,
resulting in bloom which has little chance of dissolving the CO2 anyway --
it's fleeing for the surface with all diligence. But with a slow cold brew
(room temp, whatever), the outgassing from the grind might be very slow,
resulting in smaller bubbles and no real "flight for the surface." Just a
leisurely stroll toward it, with lots of time to dissolve more efficiently
in the cooler water.
I have no idea whether any of that is valid or not.  ;-)
- Scott
On 11/14/06, Dave Ehrenkranz  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Sheila Quinn
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------030200070503080706090805
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Speaking of cold brewing, has anyone here ever attempted it? What were 
the results? I read about it online and wondered if any "real" coffee 
lover did it that way.
Sheila
Scott Marquardt wrote:
<Snip>
--------------030200070503080706090805
Content-Type: text/html; charsetO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
  
Speaking of cold brewing, has anyone here ever attempted it? What were
the results? I read about it online and wondered if any "real" coffee
lover did it that way.
Sheila
Scott Marquardt wrote:
  There's been talk of the CO2 in freshly roasted beans possibly
imparting some flavors to the cup, but I'm not sure anything's certain
on that. However, if there's anything to it, the effect would be
exacerbated with cold brew because unlike solids, gases are better
soluble at lower temperatures. Therefore, you'd get more dissolved CO2
in your cold brew, than if you did it hot.
  
   
  This might be all the more true because a very hot brew will
outgas fast, resulting in bloom which has little chance of dissolving
the CO2 anyway -- it's fleeing for the surface with all diligence. But
with a slow cold brew (room temp, whatever), the outgassing from the
grind might be very slow, resulting in smaller bubbles and no real
"flight for the surface." Just a leisurely stroll toward it, with lots
of time to dissolve more efficiently in the cooler water.
  
   
  I have no idea whether any of that is valid or not.  ;-)
   
  - Scott
  
 
  On 11/14/06, Dave Ehrenkranz <daveehr> wrote:
  Long
ago (25 yrs?) my wife and I switched to cold "brew"
concentrates. For probably the last decade I have been doing fresh
    
brews but my wife still prefers her cold "brew." This afternoon I am
roasting, grinding, and then will cold "brew" my wife some
concentrate. I am curious is resting the bean before actually
"brewing" it makes any difference. I suspect it doesn't make as much
difference as it does with fresh brewing but I am not sure.
  
  
--------------030200070503080706090805--

4) From: Sheila Quinn
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
--------------040200000802000007080403
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Oops, I meant... anyone else besides Dave? I don't ever hear anyone 
speak of it here. :)
Sheila Quinn wrote:
<Snip>
--------------040200000802000007080403
Content-Type: text/html; charsetO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
  
Oops, I meant... anyone else besides Dave? I don't ever hear anyone
speak of it here. :)
Sheila Quinn wrote:
  
Speaking of cold brewing, has anyone here ever attempted it? What were
the results? I read about it online and wondered if any "real" coffee
lover did it that way.
  
Sheila
  
  
  
  
Scott Marquardt wrote:
  
    There's been talk of the CO2 in freshly roasted beans possibly
imparting some flavors to the cup, but I'm not sure anything's certain
on that. However, if there's anything to it, the effect would be
exacerbated with cold brew because unlike solids, gases are better
soluble at lower temperatures. Therefore, you'd get more dissolved CO2
in your cold brew, than if you did it hot. 
     
    This might be all the more true because a very hot brew will
outgas fast, resulting in bloom which has little chance of dissolving
the CO2 anyway -- it's fleeing for the surface with all diligence. But
with a slow cold brew (room temp, whatever), the outgassing from the
grind might be very slow, resulting in smaller bubbles and no real
"flight for the surface." Just a leisurely stroll toward it, with lots
of time to dissolve more efficiently in the cooler water. 
     
    I have no idea whether any of that is valid or not.  ;-)
     
    - Scott
    
 
    On 11/14/06, Dave Ehrenkranz <daveehr> wrote:
    Long
ago (25 yrs?) my wife and I switched to cold "brew"
concentrates. For probably the last decade I have been doing fresh 
brews but my wife still prefers her cold "brew." This afternoon I am
roasting, grinding, and then will cold "brew" my wife some
concentrate. I am curious is resting the bean before actually
"brewing" it makes any difference. I suspect it doesn't make as much
difference as it does with fresh brewing but I am not sure.
    
    
  
--------------040200000802000007080403--

5) From: Dave Ehrenkranz
--Apple-Mail-1-585080651
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
Yes gases in general are more soluble at lower temps. Actually I  
doubt if the CO2 would form any bubbles at all in a cold brew. CO2 is  
simply too soluble. But it would slowly escape the solution just like  
CO2 leave carbonated sodas and results in a "flat" taste. I have  
never noticed any flavor due to CO2 in the cold "brewed" concentrates.
dave
On Nov 14, 2006, at 9:01 PM, Scott Marquardt wrote:
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-1-585080651
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Yes gases in general are more =
soluble at lower temps. Actually I doubt if the CO2 would form any =
bubbles at all in a cold brew. CO2 is simply too soluble. But it would =
slowly escape the solution just like CO2 leave carbonated sodas and =
results in a "flat" taste. I have never noticed any flavor due to CO2 in =
the cold "brewed" concentrates. 
dave On = Nov 14, 2006, at 9:01 PM, Scott Marquardt wrote:There's been talk of the CO2 in freshly roasted beans = possibly imparting some flavors to the cup, but I'm not sure anything's = certain on that. However, if there's anything to it, the effect would be = exacerbated with cold brew because unlike solids, gases are better = soluble at lower temperatures. Therefore, you'd get more dissolved CO2 = in your cold brew, than if you did it hot.   = This might be all the more true because a very hot brew will outgas = fast, resulting in bloom which has little chance of dissolving the CO2 = anyway -- it's fleeing for the surface with all diligence. But with a = slow cold brew (room temp, whatever), the outgassing from the grind = might be very slow, resulting in smaller bubbles and no real "flight for = the surface." Just a leisurely stroll toward it, with lots of time to = dissolve more efficiently in the cooler water.   = I have no idea whether any of that is valid or not.  ;-) =   - Scott   On 11/14/06, Dave = Ehrenkranz <daveehr> wrote: = Long ago (25 yrs?) my = wife and I switched to cold "brew" concentrates. For probably the = last decade I have been doing fresh brews but my wife still prefers = her cold "brew." This afternoon I am roasting, grinding, and then = will cold "brew" my wife some concentrate. I am curious is resting = the bean before actually "brewing" it makes any difference. I = suspect it doesn't make as much difference as it does with fresh = brewing but I am not = sure. = --Apple-Mail-1-585080651--

6) From: Tim TenClay
I've done the cold-brew thing.  I don't mind it.  With the Toddy, you
make an extract that you add hot water too - it's different from
regular coffee but VERY convienient and not bad.
I think the biggest tast difference is a result of the lowered acid
content.  It's strangly smooth.  I couldn't do it all the time, but
for a trip here and there or an occasional change, it's nice -
especially since I can now roast a half a pound (thanks to my new Hot
Top Christmas Present from my wife) -- It was a pain in the butt
before when I had to roast several batches just to get the 1/2 or 1
pound necessary for a batch.
Grace and Peace,
  `tim
On 11/15/06, Dave Ehrenkranz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
The content of this e-mail may be private or of confidential nature.
Do not forward without permission of the original author.
--
Rev. Tim TenClay, IAPC, NATA #253
Dunningville Reformed Church (www.dunningville.org)
Personal Blog:http://www.tenclay.org/blog

7) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
When I lived in Puerto Rico the farmers did something like it. They =
would put ground coffee in a white cotton sock. Put the sock in boiling =
water and let the water boil out until a black sludge was left. They =
collected the sludge in a jar and refrigerated it. Then used the sludge =
like instant coffee. They would add a teaspoon to a cup of hot water and =
stir. It was wretched and a waste of good PR coffee.

8) From: dwight clark
I cold drip with a toddy coffee maker - 1/2 lb course ground with 7 cups of 
water - steep for 12 hours. Then I mix 1/2 cup of the coffee with 1 cup of 
water. The result is the best iced coffee you will ever have. It also goes 
well with iced blended drinks. You can heat it up in the microwave, or mix 
it with boiling water for a hot cup, but I prefer to prepare hot drip for 
that. It stays fresh in the fridge for a solid week.
Dwight
<Snip>

9) From: Dave Ehrenkranz
I agree it is GREAT for ice coffee but I have found I even like fresh  
brewed for iced coffees even more.
We also find the concentrate will last multiple weeks. One can even  
make ice cubes of the concentrate which will last even longer.
After collecting the "first run" we will even add more water to the  
beans, let it steep for another 12 hours and collect a 2nd run. This  
of course is not as concentrated as the "first run" but still good.  
Where we use 1 - 2 inches of the first run for a cup of coffee we mix  
the 2nd run 1 to 1.
Again, I use fresh brew but my wife prefers the cold brew.
dave
On Nov 15, 2006, at 3:05 PM, dwight clark wrote:
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest