HomeRoast Digest


Topic: How much coffee... (16 msgs / 297 lines)
1) From: Larry Dorman
A while back I calculated how much coffee (by volume) should be used
to brew a 2.2 liter thermal pot.  Today I saw a local coffee shop use
half as much as what I calculated as the apporpriate amount.
So, the question is, what is the appropriate amount of coffee to use
for this size pot?
I don't want to influence the discussion yet, so I'm witholding the
current values for the moment, but will share them soon.
Thanks!
LarryD

2) From: Eddie Dove
Tease!
On 11/20/06, Larry Dorman  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Brett Mason
Go with 18 measured Tablespoons of coffee...  If it's too weak, try 21...
Still too weak, try 24.  be consistent and take notes...
But I would start with 18...
Brett
On 11/20/06, Larry Dorman  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

4) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
According to some charts Brett is right on the money, 18T would be a
standard brewing ratio for 2.2L, 24T connoisseur's brewing ration. I'd use
8g per 5oz as a starting point so 119g for 2.2L. (which would be a bit over
22T) FWIW same charts above 24T listed as ~127.6g, but of course volume
would depend on the bean/roast.
 
However, I'd suggest "starting" with the higher 24T and if too strong adjust
the next brewing. You can always add off boil water to dilute if too strong
but if too weak it's basically wasted.
 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee 
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc: http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm
Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Brett Mason
Sent: Monday, November 20, 2006 9:17 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +How much coffee...
Go with 18 measured Tablespoons of coffee...  If it's too weak, try 21...
Still too weak, try 24.  be consistent and take notes...
 
But I would start with 18...
 
Brett
On 11/20/06, Larry Dorman  wrote: 
A while back I calculated how much coffee (by volume) should be used
to brew a 2.2 liter thermal pot.  Today I saw a local coffee shop use 
half as much as what I calculated as the apporpriate amount.
So, the question is, what is the appropriate amount of coffee to use
for this size pot?
I don't want to influence the discussion yet, so I'm witholding the 
current values for the moment, but will share them soon.
Thanks!
LarryD-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

5) From: Scott Marquardt
55 grams / liter. That's per brewing liter, not per resulting liter. If
grind retention is about 12% of brewing water, then for 2.2 liters you'd
need to start with 2.5 liters of water, so that would require about 137
grams of coffee.
Actually, that seems a bit high to me -- a ratio of over 1:18. I like the
1:17 ratio for some reason -- but I suspect it's just my preference for
primes.   ;-)
- Scott
On 11/20/06, Larry Dorman  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Aaron
You use as much coffee as what taste good to you.
If you like 18/g then go with that,  if you like your cofee stronger and 
use 20 - 24 G go with that.
If you like Green Acres coffee and go with 80 gram then more power to ya!
Many coffee shops are going to cut corners anywhere chance they can get 
to save $$$ not to mention most folks would whine that a normally brewed 
coffee is 'too strong'.
If it discolors the water, then it's strong enough....
Aaron

7) From: Larry Dorman
Very good... it looks like I did the math accurately then.  I
instructed everyone to use a 'heaping' cup.  The coffee shop in
question uses 1/2 cup... I can only imagine how weak that must be.
Thank you everyone for your assistance...

8) From: Sheila Quinn
Only 1/2 cup for that much? Yikes... it must look like weak tea!!!
Sheila
Larry Dorman wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: raymanowen
I never used volumetric measure to reload pistol (9mm Browning HP/ .45 ACP)
cartridges until I was able to throw charges of 99.9% - 100.0% with the RCBS
Uniflow powder measure. Variations either way would bedevil attempts to work
up an accurate load.
It was serious enough to check weigh every charge when I was at maximum
load. Espresso is that serious, I think, and every "load" is a compressed-
tamped- charge.
I've only hit the espresso bullseye on maybe one shot in five, but I've
eliminated two variables. Grind pitch and quantity are no longer part of the
problem.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

10) From: Scott Marquardt
Did you ever run your gunpowder through your grinder?
;-)
On 11/23/06, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Alchemist John
At 00:07 11/23/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
Do be so fast there.  Those are not "constants" that you need to find 
the right number for, and once found, eliminated.  As you say, they 
are variables, and worse than that, they are variable influenced 
variables.  How is it you think you have eliminated them?  Maybe for 
one bean and blend at one roast level, but not across the board.
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

12) From: miKe mcKoffee
<Snip>
<Snip>
AND the variable of grind will vary with the same bean same roast depending
on variables such as rest, temperature and humidity and even type of shot
being pulled.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.

13) From: Alchemist John
At 10:02 11/23/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
Yes, those are some of the variable based variables I meant.
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

14) From: Les
How is the end result?  Lets not scare the newbies away!  I always
have fun pulling shots and sink shots are most often made into Cappos
for the ladies of the house who always ooh and awe!  It is a one in
about three  that I drink the first shot of the day.
Les
On 11/24/06, Alchemist John  wrote:
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15) From: Jon Rosen
I've seen a "magic ratio" of 1:20; 1 ounce of coffee for 20 ounces of  
water (there are 28 grams in an ounce). Personally, I find that just  
a little weak. I don't think there is a magic number, just a  
guideline, because there are other variables involved. Do you use  
paper filters or metal filters? How find is the grind? I'm still  
looking for the perfect cup, and hoping that I'll find it when my TV  
arrives next week. I suggest trying a standard ratio, like 1:20,  
picking a filter, and then varying the grind until you get the  
results that taste best to you. Then, start varying the ratio until  
you get the best possible results.
Jon
On Nov 20, 2006, at 11:21 PM, Larry Dorman wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: raymanowen
I agree with "just a guideline".
I think the reason most chefs won't divulge their Signature recipes is that=
,
even with the recipe, most ersatz cooks would botch the preparation when
they don't have the chef's technique. Water can't even exist in an open
container here above about 202F (measured with a type K thermocouple and
32F reference junction on a L&N potentiometer). "Boiling" water?
Go ahead- Live Dangerously. There are no sacred cows here. If you hit on a
good recipe for your cuppa, don't just assiduously stick to it.
I had been doing a 1:10 ratio with a 57setting on Grinder M. That worked
great on a Gold filter when I flash froze the beans before grinding. Switch
from Horse to Brazil Fazenda Ipanema.
Lose the flash freeze and gain fines, so I stuck a paper cone filter in the
mesh. Reset  grinder to 42. Wow! It's all right there, and no playing with
the fridge. For Now- -
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Another coffee victory!


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