HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT: Easiest Bread Making Ever (2 msgs / 56 lines)
1) From: Jeremy DeFranco
I don't think kneeding has much influence over flavor development,
especially since it seems as though the gluten is being properly developed
by this process. Possibly, the ferment should have been longer due to cold
weather this time of year. Often a 3rd proof adds flavor if 2 proofs does
not come out flavorful (although it will take even longer) [1st proof to
triple volume, 2nd proof to double volume]. If I had time to make this, but
didn't want to dramatically increase wait time, I would probably start off
with an overnight starter (the consistancy of pancake batter), using very
little yeast (I would first make a slurry with 1/8 teaspoon yeast and about
3/4 cup water, then use only 1 tb of the slurry diluted with enough water to
make pancake batter consistancy), and using wheat and white flours. Slurry
is ready when pre-ferment is bubbly, and has risen to the point of almost
reaching its peak. Either way, you want to catch pre-ferment on the rise,
never the fall. I would then add this to the recipe in the morning, and
follow usual or slightly longer ferment time. Another flavor building
alternative might be to follow the usual recipe, but then instead of baking
after shaping and proofing, put in fridge immediately after shaping. Take
out next morning, let sit on counter until proper pre-bake rise is reached,
and then bake. Another possible reason it might be weak on flavor is not
enough salt. BTW, I disagree with the author's comment on steam-injection
immitation at home. I've always had success with a baking stone, spraying
heavily with mister after placed on stone, and then pour large cup of ice on
floor of oven AND mist every few minutes or so for first 10 minutes of
baking. Anyway, my 2 cents from my experience. Haven't baked in about a year
though, so forget all the exact measurements, technical reasons why, etc.
Some great books available on baking now that weren't around when I had time
to bake (although James Carvel's Flavor of Bread (out of print, unless you
can read French), Julia Child's 2nd edition of Mastering Art of French
Cooking (great section on making true french bread), Baking w/ Julia, and
Baking Across America are all great books).
---I made this using King Arthur Organic flour, grey sea salt, well water,
and SAF red yeast. It looks fantastic. Big shiny holes, crispy crust.
But surprisingly little flavor for a long ferment. Maybe kneading
develops some flavor? I think this bread would benefit using from using
more bugs besides s. cerevisiae. I would also add a touch more salt and
replace 1/2 c of the white flour with whole wheat.

2) From: Lynne
I think you are right about letting it rise in the fridge - my one 
experiment was with a recipe that required it. Forget the name of the 
book (got it out of the library), but it involved using a poolish, I 
believe, then letting it cold rise in the refrigerator.
I'm just about ready to let mine start the second rise...
L.
On Nov 22, 2006, at 4:27 PM, Jeremy DeFranco wrote:
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