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Topic: Ibriks quality (4 msgs / 149 lines)
1) From: Angelo
Dennis,
the key to successful Turkish coffee is to use coffee roasted in 1975 
or earlier. Maybe you can find some over there... :-)
A+
<Snip>

2) From: MichaelB
Dennis,
Since you're so close to the origin of this coffee-making method you should
seek out some local experts to see how it's really done and what equipment
they use to do it. Then you can share the information with us. Or do all the
natives there drink instant coffee too?
Tom used to sell authentic ibriks from India, copper with tin coating inside
but he is indefinitely out of stock. Here are his sizes and prices for
comparison.
Small Ibrik from India
.3 L, 8 oz.
$23.50 (+1 lb. shipping).
Medium Ibrik from India
.5 L 12 oz.
$26.50 (+1.2 lb. shipping).
Large Ibrik from India
1.0 L 24+ oz.
$33.50 (+2.2 lb. shipping)
You should be able to get them a lot cheaper since you're buying at the
source.
Tom sells some stainless steel pitchers that can double as brikkis if
necessary. But they just don't capture the spirit or proper atmosplere of
the method.
I have a one piece copper brikki I got at a local kitchen supply store that
is sized at 22 oz that I use to make 10 oz coffee at a time. You've got to
leave lots of room in the pot because the method calls for letting the
coffee foam up to the top one or more times. The best feature of my pot is
that it is one piece - no seam at the bottom to worry about holding on to
stale liquid. Not sure if you'll be able to find any authentic models with
this feature.
As for how to brew, there are lots of good methods that work well.
Here's the information on the sweetmarias website since you can't get to the
web to read this stuff yourself:
=====
Some comments on brewing Turkish coffee ( courtesy of customer Raj Apte
1/19/06):
When brewing Turkish coffee, the foaming occurs at around 70C, much cooler
than boiling, which is why it's possible to foam the coffee repeatedly
without boiling it--higher than 75C the coffee becomes over-extracted. Much
has been written about the number of times the coffee foams: once, thrice,
&c. This is very confusing: just as in other brewing, the time spent at
brewing temperature is your best guide.
Instead of foaming and cooling cycles, I modulate the flame to maintain a
continuous foam for the duration of the extraction time. To me it seems
simpler and more consistent to use extraction time, as in other brewing
styles.
Procedure:
Room temperature water with sugar, coffee, and spices stirred in is put onto
the gas at medium heat. At two minutes, when foaming starts at the edges of
the ibrik, slowly begin reducing the heat. The goal is to keep the coffee
foaming, but not to let it rise more than a quarter of its volume. If you
turn the gas down too quickly and the foaming stops, just turn it back up.
The goal is to foam for 3 additional minutes (5 minutes total time). At 6
minutes total the coffee tastes overextracted, and at 4 it can be thin. The
temperature at the end of 5 minutes should be around 75C. At the end of
extraction time, add just a touch of room temperature water to end the
brewing--10% should be plenty.
I swirl the ibrik gently to help the grounds caught in the foam subside and
place the ibrik in a saucer of water to cool. After 1-2 minutes of settling,
pour the coffee gently to retain the grounds. With a good brew, you should
have enough foam to cover most or all of the surface of a demitasse cup.
Coffee amount:
Between 7-10% of initial water mass. At 10% the body is heavy and many will
find it harsh. 8% is very nice. This method of brewing can accentuate the
acidity of the beans--the coffee is very different from french press in
flavour profile (this is not surprising since the extraction temperature is
so much lower).
Sugar amount:
0-4% of water mass. I find using half the mass of coffee is just about the
maximum to balance the bitterness and really let the acidity shine.
Grinding:
I like the Zass turkish mill. Mine is set 3/4 of a turn past french
press--the burrs brush lightly when there is no grist.
=====
Have fun! Enjoy your time on land.
On 11/27/06, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)  wrote:
<Snip>
--
MichaelB

3) From: Frank Parth
On Monday, November 27, 2006, at 01:02PM, "MichaelB"  wrote:
<Snip>
Let me jump in here since I just left Dubai last weekend and will be returning on Friday (for only one night, unfortunately). The only thing I ever saw outside of the five star hotel where I was teaching was instant coffee. Even in the souqs, the open-air markets, instant coffee was the way to go. Convenience and price trump quality almost every time (except for those of us that are "over the edge").
In the appliance shops you can buy the same espresso machines we buy in the U.S. The only difference is they're wired for 220 V.
Frank Parth

4) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
Ok Need some expertise here from the turkis coffee experts...
Here I am in the Indian Ocean with an upcomming port of Dubai UAE while
I am there I am looking to purchase an ibriks, cezve, briki, mbiki or
toorka Turkish coffee maker. If some one could give me a lowdown on what
are my points of quality on one of these (made from what metal? what are
the weak points I need to pay attention to? Reasonable price range
etc..) I would be very grateful 
BTW anybody need anything while I am here?
Dennis
AKA
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True
CS/CS-5
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69)
FPO AE 09532-2830
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Indian Ocean
 "On station and on point 156 and counting down..." 
"Direct support for troops on the ground is only a call away in support
of Operation Eagle!"


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