HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Opening a Can of Worms (49 msgs / 1709 lines)
1) From: john nanavati
For an entry or mid level of homeroaster, what is the major difference in
final product between the many techniques that are discussed here (Popper,
IR2, Heat Gun, Bread Machine, stove top, Stir Crazy, .... )? I made the
"entry to mid level" caveat, because I would suspect that as I train my
palate, I might be able to experience more subtle flavors.
Is it that they all can bring the same result but your technique depends
upon your desired level of involvement in the roast process and need for
outcome consistency? (I'm making the assumption that the more automated the
process the more consistent or predictable the result will be)
John Nanavati
Plainfield, New Jersey

2) From: Vicki Smith
My weird POV...
I've been roasting for a bit less than a year. I started with an IR2, 
because it seemed to be the least intimidating choice, and given our 
winters and the lack of a real ventilation system, the best choice of 
the roasting appliances for me.
I added in the bread machine/heat gun combination this summer, mainly 
because I often wished for a bigger sized roast, but also because I 
found that even with a temperature probe, and careful attention, I 
didn't feel like I was learning to be a better roaster, mostly because 
of the built in limitations of the IR2 having to do with control over 
the roast and the difficulty hearing the cracks.
I was surprised to find that the lessons learnt from bread machine 
roasting made me a better roaster using my IR2. There was something 
synergistic happening. I even became more adept at hearing the cracks 
from the iRoast, somehow.
As far as final product, the biggest difference I see is my ability to 
control the time between first and second crack in the bread machine. I 
think my bread machine roasts result in a more complex cup, and I 
certainly feel like I have much greater control than I ever do over IR2 
batches.
It is -30C here right now. No bread machine roasting for this gal today.
vicki
john nanavati wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Diablo
To address the fist post, I wouldn's say that automation leads to consistancy
persay.  The reduction of variables leads to more consistancy.  The human hand,
that is the artisan's touch that is a variable in and of itself.  
The methods you mention, all revolve around the artisan and require touch.  I
do believe learning the hands on approach (read, more touch) leads to more
knowledge of your medium.  You learn more variables and the impact those
variables have on your product.  From that point you learn what you want and
like.  
Going from hands on to automation would be a process of learning your beans and
knowing what you want to do with them once you know how to control your
variables.  
--- Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Elliott Perkins
Hi John,
I've been roasting coffee for a year and a half now.  I have roasted 
with a wok and, mostly, with a stove top popper.  I know that these are 
the right tools for me because I enjoy the process.  I like to control 
the heat with a flame, and I don't need to record a lot of data.  I have 
a timer, and when I get in a rut, I take some notes and make some 
changes in my roasting.  Generally, I have improved and learned, but I 
am not sure I could hang in a technical discussion.
So, my advice is this: think about what you will enjoy about the 
process, and choose accordingly.  If you enjoy soldering and 
instrumentation, pick an electric roaster you can disassemble and 
reconfigure.  If you like flames and the inquisitive sniffing of smoke 
and don't mind a tired arm, then hey, you might want to try a whirly-pop.
Bear in mind that I am essentially a novice.
Good luck,
Elliott
john nanavati wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Sheila Quinn
I'm like you! I like the control of roasting by hand - either in a wok 
on the stovetop or the HG/DB outside on the patio. Great control and I 
actually enjoy the hands-on part of it. I'm no good at tinkering with 
electrical components either, so other methods wouldn't work nearly as 
well for me. So you're right; everyone is different.
Sheila
Elliott Perkins wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Brett Mason
I'm like both of you a little.  I am a half-tinkerer.  I can take most
anything apart....
I like skillet roasting, primarily cause I like to completely participate in
the roasting, without nakedness or getting burnt.  OK, so that means
stirring, sniffing, blowing out the chaff, and managing the roast down to
each little bean.
I couldn't find the solenoid on my skillet, so I have not disassembled it...
Brett
On 11/29/06, Sheila Quinn  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

7) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-353--309629257
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
Holy  crap!!! Where are you, Antarctica?
On Nov 29, 2006, at 9:15 AM, Vicki Smith wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-353--309629257
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Holy crap!!! Where are you, =
Antarctica?
On Nov 29, 2006, at 9:15 AM, Vicki Smith =
wrote:

It is = -30C here right now. No bread machine roasting for this gal = today.

Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-353--309629257--

8) From: Lynne
--Apple-Mail-2--308322623
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charsetO-8859-1;
	format=flowed
I thought the same things, Sandy - then I noticed it's Celsius... whew!
Converted it to Farenheit:
which means it's equal to  -25.6 F!
Now that's SO much better!!
Lynne
On Nov 29, 2006, at 2:30 PM, Sandy Andina wrote:
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-2--308322623
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/enriched;
	charsetO-8859-1
I thought the same things, Sandy - then I noticed it's Celsius... whew!
Converted it to Farenheit:
which means it's equal to  -25.6 F!
Now that's SO much better!!
Lynne
On Nov 29, 2006, at 2:30 PM, Sandy Andina wrote:
Holy crap!!! Where are you, Antarctica?
On Nov 29, 2006, at 9:15 AM, Vicki Smith wrote:
HelveticaIt is -30C here
right now. No bread machine roasting for this gal =
today.
Lucida =
GrandeSandy
Lucida =
Grandewww.sandyandina.com
Lucida =
Grandewww.sass-music.com
=
--Apple-Mail-2--308322623--

9) From: raymanowen
John, you have a good grip on what's going on, and you express it well.
Please permit me to compare and contrast your comments:
"I might be able to experience more subtle flavors." -You can detect and
appreciate different flavors. [Even part of a batch with just a few hours'
age will be different than the same after a few or several days.]
If you think you appreciate Ethiopian Harar now, try some after a 10 day
rest...
"Is it that they all can bring the same result but your technique depends
upon your desired level of involvement in the roast process and need for
outcome consistency?"
[Outcome consistency- that's so Same- Isn't that why we dropped out of the
trees and quit with the bananas and Folgers?]
"(I'm making the assumption that the more automated the process the more
consistent or predictable the result will be)" [Fourbucks is predictable and
consistent. So is Folgers, but swinging from a tree is behind us.]
With the exception of heart surgery, not many give a hoot about "predictable
and consistency." And, would you want yours done by programmed nanobots,
even with their angstrom precision? Who knew you were left-handed and wired
backwards, as in right brain controls right side?
That reminds me- Dad and I revisited Swedish Hospital about May '74. I had
been a "guest" weeks before. One of the docs recognized me and said, "I
remember you when you didn't look so pretty..."
"Doctor, I understand I had a brain scan as part of my treatment. How'd that
all turn out?"
"Good news and bad news, Ray."
"What's the good news?"
"We didn't find anything."
"Uh, oh. What's the bad news?"
"We didn't find anything."
Stoppitt, Ray! It's all true.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
" The only real valuable thing is intuition." - -Albert Einstein
On 11/29/06, john nanavati < coffee> wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

10) From: raymanowen
It all comes out in the wash at -40 degrees. -ro

11) From: scott miller
why, it's almost shorts & t-shirt weather, eh?
cheers,
Scott --> it's a balmy 77 F here in Statesboro, GA. The cats are panting &
I'm considering an iced mocha.
On 11/29/06, Lynne  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Lynne
--Apple-Mail-3--307369925
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charsetO-8859-1;
	format=flowed
What I want to know, Sandy - do you have enough suntan lotion???
; > )
Lynne
On Nov 29, 2006, at 3:01 PM, scott miller wrote:
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-3--307369925
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/enriched;
	charsetO-8859-1
What I want to know, Sandy - do you have enough suntan lotion???
; > )
Lynne
On Nov 29, 2006, at 3:01 PM, scott miller wrote:
why, it's almost shorts & t-shirt weather, eh?
cheers,
Scott --> it's a balmy 77 F here in Statesboro, GA. The cats are
panting & I'm considering an iced mocha.
 On 11/29/06, Lynne
<<0000,0000,EEEElynnebiz>
wrote:
Converted it to Farenheit:
which means it's equal to-25.6 F!
Now that's SO much better!!
Lynne
On Nov 29, 2006, at 2:30 PM, Sandy Andina wrote: 
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
=
--Apple-Mail-3--307369925--

13) From: Vicki Smith
Nope, Central Alberta. We get a few weeks like this each winter. Not 
usually in November though. Our low during those weeks is often -40, 
and, more often than not, we have a wind chill on top of it.
On days like this, I love my IR2.
vicki
Sandy Andina wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Vicki Smith
We're going to have a heat wave this weekend--+2C on Sunday. It doesn't 
help that this time of year, the sun doesn't rise until almost 8:20 and 
it sets at about 4:30.
v

15) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-358--305912969
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
Yeeowch!  I guess I'll stop complaining about Chicago winters (the  
coldest we've ever had since I moved here in '78 was -26F, with wind  
chills to -60F).
It's been in the high 60sF, with nighttime lows above 50, for nearly  
a week now.  Stormed like crazy this morning--lightning set off car  
alarms, roof leaked a little.  Under a tornado watch for tonight.  
Tomorrow, we're supposed to have falling temps (50 at dawn down to 20  
by evening) with rain turning to slop, slush and snow by afternoon,  
with snow accumulations within the city between 3-6"  (and in the  
south suburbs 6-12") by Friday night. We had snow several times back  
in late Oct., but nothing stuck. Tomorrow will be different. We are  
capable of getting all four seasons within a 24-hr. period here.
On Nov 29, 2006, at 2:21 PM, Vicki Smith wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-358--305912969
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Yeeowch! I guess I'll stop =
complaining about Chicago winters (the coldest we've ever had since I =
moved here in '78 was -26F, with wind chills to -60F).
It's been in the high 60sF, = with nighttime lows above 50, for nearly a week now. Stormed like = crazy this morning--lightning set off car alarms, roof leaked a little.= Under a tornado watch for tonight. Tomorrow, we're supposed to have = falling temps (50 at dawn down to 20 by evening) with rain turning to = slop, slush and snow by afternoon, with snow accumulations within the = city between 3-6" (and in the south suburbs 6-12") by Friday night. = We had snow several times back in late Oct., but nothing stuck. Tomorrow = will be different. We are capable of getting all four seasons within a = 24-hr. period here. On Nov 29, 2006, at 2:21 PM, Vicki = Smith wrote:
Nope, Central Alberta. We get a = few weeks like this each winter. Not usually in November though. Our low = during those weeks is often -40, and, more often than not, we have a = wind chill on top of it. On days like this, I love my = IR2. vicki Sandy Andina wrote: = Holy crap!!! Where are you, = Antarctica? homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-358--305912969--

16) From: john nanavati
Thanks all for the comments so far - I'm enjoying the discussion ... of
course, I should since I initiated it ;- )
I thoroughly appreciate Diablo's comments about artistic development. Part
of the reason that I enjoy roasting is hands-on and being attached to my
product. I don't have a desire to place the ingredients in a machine, press
a button, and return to roasted coffee - if that were my goal, I'd save a
lot of heartache and pain by buying from a local roaster.
At the same time, I would like to be able to produce a predictable end
result so that I can experiment with the different roasting aspects (time,
temperature, method) and see how the beans react. Just like cooking a fine
meal, I would also like to be able to roast as gifts or for special
celebrations and be able to recreate something wonderful that I had
discovered.
Aside from the esoteric discussion of why. I am also interested in the nuts
and bolts of how. I used to be a trumpet player and a silver vs raw brass vs
red brass vs brand ... would create greatly different results from the same
musician.
Given a level playing field, can the same roaster produce comparable
finished beans using different techniques? It's sounding like the answer is
yes - or at least yes for my level (beginner - intermediate). Whether I use
a IR2, DB, or popper I can produce similar tasting roasts. It just depends
upon my preference for hands-on vs observation.
What the difference for a professional roaster? Just bigger lot size, skill,
experience, and artistry?
I have also noticed some discussion threads where people will mention using
one technique for a darker vs lighter roasts. It also sounds as if many
people have a couple techniques that they use or switch between in an
on-going basis.

17) From: Brian Kamnetz
John,
I think that others will provide specific information, but the answer is
yes, provided you are able to track your variables. The most important data
are time and temperature, so you must have ways to accurately (or at least
consistently) monitor these two things.
Brian
On 11/29/06, john nanavati  wrote:
<Snip>

18) From: Brett Mason
Hi John,
Another answer to your question is this:
Different roast methods CAN bring the same result.  BUT, each roast method
can elevate a certain aspect of the roast, and can be leveraged accordingly.
For example,
  1. wok/skillet roasting produce more of an uneven roast, a melange if you
will.  This is fine if you don't mind some variegation in your end result.
Also helps if you want to pull more of the nuances from a single bean in the
same roast.
  2.  Popper roasting tends to race pretty quick, leaving mroe of a
BRIGHTNESS to the roast.
  3.  Any method which goes too slow can BAKE your beans, leaving them flat
tasting, or worse.
There's more to this than I have indicated, but others will concur that
different methods tend to produce different results...  Don't miss that
part!
I like skillet roasting a lot; I also like my drum roasting.  I never got
good at Whirley-pop roasting (but many swear by that method).  Heat-gun
Dog-bowl always pissed off my German Shepherd, and he can get real angry if
you stick the gun in his face...  etc.
Brett
On 11/29/06, john nanavati  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

19) From:
John:
The only caveat that exists is YOUR TASTE. 
The major difference in final product between the many techniques that are discussed here is your taste John.
You may "get/have/smell/feel/taste something like "those" other people get but John it simply what you get that matters.
warmest regards,
ginny
---- john nanavati  wrote: 
<Snip>

20) From: john nanavati
Brett. Are there other resources that discuss the aspects that you
mentioned? I know that I've heard some discussion in the group about them.
I'll have to dig through some of the archives to see if I can find the
comments again.
I understand that the end results will be my taste and preference. I'm just
trying to understand how technique effects the roast.
I used to think that I would save up to buy a IR2, but I'm enjoying fiddling
with my popper as it roasts. I'm really digging the HG/DB concept - it just
seems as if you could have so much direct control over the process. And the
concept of converting my old bread machine into a roaster sounds like a good
weekend project  ;- )
John Nanavati
Plainfield, New Jersey

21) From: Vicki Smith
John, just for curiosity sake, what kind of converting are you planning 
as a weekend project?
Vicki (a plain old no conversions needed bread maker/heat gun roaster)
john nanavati wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: Brett Mason
John,
I would start with Sweet Maria's links for methods:http://www.sweetmarias.com/instructions.htmlThen I would also check out www.homeroasters.org - you'll see many new
folks, and many you already read from here.  There are other sites (i.e.
search with Google), but start with these...
Hope that helps,
Brett
On 11/29/06, john nanavati  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

23) From: Brett Mason
23 here in Iowa right now!
Brrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
 brett
On 11/30/06, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

24) From: Darliene Stanhope
65 in the Florida panhandle.
Perfect boating weather, :-)
Darliene
On 11/29/06, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: Lynne
--Apple-Mail-1--243064460
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charsetO-8859-1;
	format=flowed
Another cloudy day in Boston - 57 degrees, 86% humidity....chance of 
showers & it might SNOW any day now!
I love it!
Lynne
(forever optimistic)
On Nov 30, 2006, at 12:18 AM, Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-1--243064460
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/enriched;
	charsetO-8859-1
Another cloudy day in Boston - 57 degrees, 86% humidity....chance of
showers & it might SNOW any day now!
I love it!
Lynne
(forever optimistic)
On Nov 30, 2006, at 12:18 AM, Brett Mason wrote:
23 here in Iowa right now!
Brrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
brett
On 11/30/06, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
<<0000,0000,EEEETrueDW >
wrote:And her I am today it is 92F for the high but sunrise is 6:30
sunset is 
4:30
Dennis
AKA
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True
CS/CS-5
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69)
FPO AE 09532-2830
Man of many hats!
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Indian Ocean
 "On station and on point 155 and counting down..." 
"Direct support for troops on the ground is only a call away in support
of Operation Eagle!"

26) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
And her I am today it is 92F for the high but sunrise is 6:30 sunset is
4:30 
Dennis
AKA
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True
CS/CS-5
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69)
FPO AE 09532-2830
Man of many hats!
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Indian Ocean
 "On station and on point 155 and counting down..." 
"Direct support for troops on the ground is only a call away in support
of Operation Eagle!"

27) From: Brett Mason
It's 13 degrees out, but the precipitation missed - so NO SNOW ... this
e3quals disappointed kids - DRAT!
Snow Soon, Coffee Tonite,
Brett
On 11/30/06, Lynne  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

28) From: Tom Ogren
75 and sunny here in Williamsburg, VA today! Sumatra Classic (FC+)/Green
Stripe (C+) blend is excellent too...
TO in VA
On 11/30/06, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

29) From: john nanavati
hey,
what about your clothes dryer? i bet you could crank that thing up, put the
beans in a nice mesh, or lingerie, bag, and let 'er rip. an added benefit is
that your clothes could have a nice coffee sent and you may not need starch
because they'll absorb some residual caffeine.
just a thought ;- )
John Nanavati
Plainfield, New Jersey

30) From: Brett Mason
Replace the plastic and make one heck of a roaster!
Brett
On 11/30/06, john nanavati  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

31) From: LInda Reese
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Good morning everyone,
    58 degrees and rainy in Albany, NY! I've taken the day off from work =
to get errands done, like picking up tickets to a Boston Camerata =
concert and then having the snow tires put on my car! How's that for =
optimistic! I'm with you Lynne; I'd much prefer snow! I've also managed =
to roast several batches of the new PNG - Kimel Peaberry this morning; =
it's quite lovely. Have a great day, Linda

32) From: Lynne
--Apple-Mail-2--238079148
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charsetO-8859-1;
	format=flowed
Hi Linda!
I'm running off to work (RE rentals - hopefully this will lead to 
actual MONEY!) - but are you going to be coming to Boston?? If so - you =
HAVE to look me up!
Lynne
On Nov 30, 2006, at 10:06 AM, LInda Reese wrote:
<Snip>
from 
<Snip>
Camerata 
<Snip>
<Snip>
Peaberry 
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-2--238079148
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/enriched;
	charsetO-8859-1
Hi Linda!
I'm running off to work (RE rentals - hopefully this will lead to
actual MONEY!) - but are you going to be coming to Boston?? If so -
you HAVE to look me up! 
Lynne 
On Nov 30, 2006, at 10:06 AM, LInda Reese wrote:
ArialGood
morningeveryone,
Arial 58 degrees and rainy =
in
Albany, NY! I've taken theday off from work to get errands done, like
picking up tickets toa Boston Camerata concert and then having the
snow tires put on my car!How's that for optimistic! I'm with you
Lynne; I'd much prefer snow! I've alsomanaged to roast several
batches of the new PNG - Kimel Peaberry this morning; it'squite
lovely.Have a great day, Linda
=
--Apple-Mail-2--238079148--

33) From: john nanavati
I don't know yet.
it's going to take me a bit to do it because i'm not an electronics wiz ...
but i hope that i can find the wire to activate the stirrer and the one to
activate the heating element. it just seems logical that i could add a oven
temp gauge to the bucket, have a switch to activate the stirrer (maybe even
the speed) and another for the heating element.
just thinking.
John Nanavati
Plainfield, New Jersey

34) From: Vicki Smith
The one flaw I see in this would be how long it would take the bread 
machine to come up to roasting temperature vs how long you want to take 
with the roast and then your ability to adjust your roasting profile.
When I roast with a heat gun, I am applying a whole lot of heat from the 
very beginning, and getting at a first crack at around 8-9 minutes. If 
it came up to temperature slowly, you might risk getting the dreaded 
*baked* affect. Throughout the roast, I adjust the temperature by moving 
the heat gun closer or further away from the beans as the bread machine 
stirs them, and by choosing different temperature settings for the heat gun.
The ability to make adjustments as I roast is one of the pleasures of 
roasting with this sort of device, as opposed to using a roasting 
appliance. I wonder if it would still be possible to have this amount of 
control with the mods you are talking about making?
vicki
john nanavati wrote:
<Snip>

35) From: john nanavati
good point. i don't know about the temp. i intended to do some research
before doing anything, of course. but if i can turn on and off the heating
element, i could heat up the machine before adding the beans. the one thing
that i don't know is how hot the machine could get and sustain.
if it can go up to 500, then i could place the element on a "dimmer" (some
appropriate and safe control), preheat to some yet to be decided temp, add
beans, and go ... or at least so i think ;- )
does that sound feasible? i'm just thinking about it like a mini oven.
do most "bread machiners" simply use the machine to churn the beans or do
they use the heating element as well?
On 11/30/06, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanavati
Plainfield, New Jersey

36) From: Brian Kamnetz
John,
Most bread machiners who have posted use the bread machine only because they
do not like stirring by hand. However (and I can't find it in my Gmail
archive, so I must have deleted it), within the last month, it seems,
someone posted results of roasting solely with a bread machine, utilizing
only the bread machine as a heat source. Seems like it worked ok, except
that the heat cycled on and off, and the person was going to try to bypass
the electronics that cycled the heat on and off. I'm assuming the person
hasn't got around to doing that yet, because I haven't seen the results
posted.
Brian
On 11/30/06, john nanavati  wrote:
<Snip>

37) From: Vicki Smith
Before I discovered that I really, really like the control that 
operating the heat gun gives me, I had tried using a turbo oven sorta 
thing as a heat source with my bread machine. It worked well enough, 
though I would have had to work on the chaff end of it had I continued 
with it, and I would have had some temp regulating to do, but it has 
been done by other folks, and I could have done it as well.
It all came down to two things for me. The first was my basic laziness. 
Yes, I could do some modding, but, as I said, I'm lazy. The second was 
the ease with which I could get really fine and consistent results with 
the heat gun and still be able to roast large amounts of coffee, as 
compared with my IR2.
Had my goal been to end up with a pretty much hands off roasting 
appliance that let me roast a pound or more of coffee, it might have 
been worth investing the time, but I really had no desire or need to be 
hands off for the 15 minutes or so it takes me with a heat gun and bread 
machine to roast.
vicki

38) From: raymanowen
Nearly all you people east of the Rockies are now receiving your comeupence
for reporting thermometer readings above 0 F.  Denver was 0 F this
morning, while Boulder was way up at 2 F. We're kinda midway, but usuall=
y
get the Boulder burn when there's a Chinook ["Snow Eater"] downslope
westerly wind.
I guess I should be called the Illogical Roaster.
Rather than measure the elusive bean temperature, I just assign the
temperature equivalent to 1st Crack when it happens.
Then, realizing the beans have just lost most of their moisture and will
quickly heat up, I throttle back and Zen interpolate the trip to second,
maybe coaxing a few snaps if I want just under 2nd. Or I can let it get to
the cusp of a rolling 2nd Crack. I savor the glorious aroma of the early
smoke.
This wouldn't work worth a fiddler's flutch if I couldn't stop it right whe=
n
I wanted. With an 11" screen mesh colander sitting in the intake of a
furnace blower. The colossal airflow stops the roast in 5 seconds, and 360g
of beans are dead cold in 15 or 20 seconds.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
"The indisputable truth is that no coffee is fresh if it isn't fresh
roasted." - - Martin Diedrich

39) From: Lynne
Pondering what's a flutch, and what would a fiddler do with it...
L.
On Nov 30, 2006, at 9:11 PM, raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>

40) From: Leo Zick
This is a multipart message in MIME format.
It was 2degF in SD this morning, and landing in NY provided some humid 65deg
weather.
Big change!
From: Tom Ogren [mailto:togren] 
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2006 9:27 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Opening a Can of Worms
75 and sunny here in Williamsburg, VA today! Sumatra Classic (FC+)/Green
Stripe (C+) blend is excellent too...
TO in VA
On 11/30/06, Brett Mason  wrote:
It's 13 degrees out, but the precipitation missed - so NO SNOW ... this
e3quals disappointed kids - DRAT!
Snow Soon, Coffee Tonite,
Brett
On 11/30/06, Lynne  wrote: 
Another cloudy day in Boston - 57 degrees, 86% humidity....chance of
showers & it might SNOW any day now! 
I love it!
Lynne
(forever optimistic)
On Nov 30, 2006, at 12:18 AM, Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
 ] On Behalf Of Vicki
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

41) From: Eddie Dove
Kinda like the weather down here ... when I left for work yesterday morning
it was about 72 degrees and this morning it was 37 degrees.
Eddie
On 12/1/06, Leo Zick  wrote:
<Snip>

42) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-31--102624934
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
It's been in the 20s here in Chicago since about 2 am, and mirabile  
dictu, in Edgewater on the far N. lakefront we got at most maybe 3, 4  
inches of snow (The N and W burbs were not so lucky--some got over a  
foot).  Afternoon rush hour was utterly painless. However, there are  
slick spots in many parking lots--folks are not used to dealing with  
this when the calendar still says "autumn."  My son and his friends  
left for the Nat'l Improv. Fest. in DC at midnight, before the first  
true flakes fell--and when they reached the Skyway, they found the  
plows and salt trucks had preceded them. They made Baltimore by 11 am  
and were in their VA hotel rooms by 12:15. Outran the entire winter  
storm. (Of course, there's that little matter of a tornado watch and  
severe thunderstorm to contend with in the Middle Atlantic states,  
but at least that stuff doesn't freeze).
On Dec 1, 2006, at 10:45 PM, Eddie Dove wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-31--102624934
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
It's been in the 20s here in =
Chicago since about 2 am, and mirabile dictu, in Edgewater on the far N. =
lakefront we got at most maybe 3, 4 inches of snow (The N and W burbs =
were not so lucky--some got over a foot). Afternoon rush hour was =
utterly painless. However, there are slick spots in many parking =
lots--folks are not used to dealing with this when the calendar still =
says "autumn." My son and his friends left for the Nat'l Improv. =
Fest. in DC at midnight, before the first true flakes fell--and when =
they reached the Skyway, they found the plows and salt trucks had =
preceded them. They made Baltimore by 11 am and were in their VA hotel =
rooms by 12:15. Outran the entire winter storm. (Of course, there's that =
little matter of a tornado watch and severe thunderstorm to contend with =
in the Middle Atlantic states, but at least that stuff doesn't =
freeze).
On Dec 1, 2006, at 10:45 PM, Eddie Dove =
wrote:
Kinda like the weather down here ... when I left for work = yesterday morning it was about 72 degrees and this morning it was 37 = degrees. Eddie On = 12/1/06, Leo Zick <leo> = wrote:

It was 2degF in SD = this morning, and landing in NY provided some humid 65deg = weather.

Big change!



From: Tom Ogren [mailto:togren] = Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2006 9:27 AM To: homeroast= Subject: Re: +Opening a Can of Worms

=

75 and sunny here in Williamsburg, VA today! Sumatra Classic = (FC+)/Green Stripe (C+) blend is excellent too... TO in VA

=

On 11/30/06, Brett Mason <homeroast> = wrote:

It's 13 degrees out, but the precipitation = missed - so NO SNOW ... this e3quals disappointed kids - DRAT!

=
=

Snow Soon, Coffee Tonite,

Brett =

On 11/30/06, Lynne <lynnebiz> = wrote:

Another cloudy day in Boston - 57 degrees, 86% = humidity....chance of showers & it might SNOW any day now! = I love it! Lynne (forever optimistic) On = Nov 30, 2006, at 12:18 AM, Brett Mason wrote: > 23 here in = Iowa right now! > Brrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr > brett = > > On 11/30/06, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69) < TrueDW = > > wrote:And her I am today it is 92F for the high but = sunrise is 6:30 > sunset is >> 4:30 >> = >> Dennis >> AKA >> FC1(SW) Dennis W. = True >> CS/CS-5 >> USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN = 69) >> FPO AE 09532-2830 >> >> Man of many = hats! >> HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Indian Ocean = >>"On station and on point 155 and counting down..." = >> "Direct support for troops on the ground is only a call away = in >> support >> of Operation Eagle!" >> = >> >> >>


43) From: raymanowen
My older brother used to play the Clarinet and would deflect criticism if he
hit a sour note by referring to it as "a fiddler's flutch."
There was a George Gershwin piece [An American in Paris] that he always made
sound so smooth on the opening- a sliding glissando, I think. My Trombone
was built for that, but when Bill started practicing the piece- on a big
licorice stick with Keys, the dog would bare his teeth and growl when he hit
a sour note. "Oops- Fiddler's Flutch!"
Big mistake for the dog. I'd get out the Trombone and we'd play a duet we
had transcribed. We could play in unison or I could play bass. When Bill hit
the ff, I'd make the Trombone growl and the mutt would go nuts.
One of these days Alice, maybe I'll get to do some Hanon finger exercises on
the Midmer-Losh organ in the Boardwalk Hall at Atlantic City. I could use it
and so could It!
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
A mistake on the 100 inch Tubas would be deafening-
On 11/30/06, Lynne  wrote:
<Snip>

44) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-33--97121435
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
hmmmm....doesn't "Rhapsody in Blue" begin with alternating notes  
accelerating into a vibrato followed by a long gliss on clarinet?
On Dec 2, 2006, at 12:12 AM, raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-33--97121435
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charset-ASCII
hmmmm....doesn't "Rhapsody in =
Blue" begin with alternating notes accelerating into a vibrato followed =
by a long gliss on clarinet?
On Dec 2, 2006, at 12:12 AM, =
raymanowen =
wrote:
My older brother used to play the Clarinet and would = deflect criticism if he hit a sour note by referring to it as "a = fiddler's flutch." There was a George Gershwin piece [An American = in Paris] that he always made sound so smooth on the opening- a sliding = glissando, I think. My Trombone was built for that, but when Bill = started practicing the piece- on a big licorice stick with Keys, the dog = would bare his teeth and growl when he hit a sour note. "Oops- Fiddler's = Flutch!" Big mistake for the dog. I'd get out the Trombone and = we'd play a duet we had transcribed. We could play in unison or I could = play bass. When Bill hit the ff, I'd make the Trombone growl and the = mutt would go nuts. One of these days Alice, maybe I'll get to = do some Hanon finger exercises on the Midmer-Losh organ in the Boardwalk = Hall at Atlantic City. I could use it and so could It! Cheers = -RayO, aka Opa! A mistake on the 100 inch Tubas would be = deafening- On 11/30/06, Lynne <lynnebiz> = wrote: Pondering what's a flutch, and what would a fiddler do with = it... Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-33--97121435--

45) From: Scot Murphy
<Snip>
Ray, do you mind if I share this with another list I am on? A bunch  
of them are musicians, and two (perhaps three) of them are  
trombonists and seem to love eccentric trombone stories. They'd love  
it. May I?
Scot "plays nothing but the fool" Murphy

46) From: raymanowen
"that stuff doesn't freeze"
Have you not enjoyed sleet or hail yet? I remember more sleet than hail as a
kid in Peoria.
In the early 70's, the bumper stickers read, "Don't Californicate Colorado!"
After the insane traffic reports in the last couple of days, I'm watching
for a bumper sticker on an Edsel that reads, "...and we left dust storms and
freeze dried coffee on Mars for This?"
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

47) From: raymanowen
Oh, Sandy- you're quite right. That little bit of trivia just popped to mind
from the middle of Last Century. My Trombone is about 15 feet away.
Unfortunately, the Leblanc is silent.
We sure had fun- the Clarinet sounded so sexy in all its registers. Is there
coffee like that? Yes! and I just finished the last cup of a 1.25L TV pot of
it. Brazil Fazenda Ipanema halted just a couple of snaps into 2nd. Or maybe
a few. It's the good stuff. Ground at 52, brewed 1:10.
Scot, share for sure- can you imagine a 16' Posaune or a 32' Trombone as a
Woodwind reed?
Take a gander at . Interestingly, there's a picture of a
fellow tuning one of the 32' Trombones, and another one of the final organ
contract that shows the 32' Trombone rank as deleted. A Trombone ten guys
could barely carry in a marching band, with dozens in the rank!
The instrument is an enigma- the same contract shows the 64' Diaphone
Profunda as deleted, and a picture of a young Asian gal looking at a row of
the telephone booth-sized reed boxes at the base of some of the
brobdingnagian pipes.
The lowest pipe speaks at 8.11Hz.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Deep Flavor-

48) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-36--38140509
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
I meant tornadoes, and in VA to boot, but I suppose anything's  
possible. To me, freezing rain is the WORST--at least you can get  
traction in snow.
On Dec 2, 2006, at 1:10 AM, raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-36--38140509
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charset-ASCII
I meant tornadoes, and in VA to =
boot, but I suppose anything's possible. To me, freezing rain is the =
WORST--at least you can get traction in snow.
On Dec 2, =
2006, at 1:10 AM, raymanowen =
wrote:
"that stuff doesn't = freeze" Have you not enjoyed sleet or hail yet? I remember more sleet = than hail as a kid in Peoria. Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-36--38140509--

49) From: Aaron
I grew up in Oak Forest / Tinley Park and don't recall a ton of hail, 
sleet yes, hail not really, but SNOW, good grief a ton of that.  
Tornado's,  umm yah seen a few of those.  oh and lets not forget the 31 
Degrees Below zero days BEFORE the wind chill kicked in.
Speaking of norfolk and areas of similar nature, let's not forget our 
noreasters and hurricanes... blech.
aaron


HomeRoast Digest