HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Coffee caramels? (16 msgs / 367 lines)
1) From: Demian Ebert
Morning-
Every couple of years we make caramels as holiday gifts for friends and
family. The recipe is from my wife's grandmother and results in a great
caramel. The recipe is essentially corn syrup, sugar, heavy cream, and
butter. This year we are considering flavoring them with a bit of SMs
espresso: Monkey caramels. I'm a bit leery of cooking the espresso too long
and having it turn bitter before the caramels are done. One recipe we read
on the web added their coffee in with the cream. We could add it hot at the
very end, mix in and pour to cool.
So my question to this list is this: At what point is it best to add a
flavoring such as espresso to a sugar based candy?  Any candy makers out
there?
Thanks in advance
Demian

2) From: Vicki Smith
In my caramel recipe (which is probably much like yours) I add vanilla 
at the end, and I would be inclined to treat the espresso the same way. 
My concern would be the total amount of liquid in the recipe as all the 
espresso/coffee caramel recipes I have seen uses a powdered flavouring 
for this.
vicki
Demian Ebert wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Lynne
I don't make candy - but I was thinking the same thing. Why not soak 
the ground coffee in the milk (heat it before adding), then filter. Let 
it sit for awhile until you have a coffee flavored milk...
Just a thought.
Lynne
On Dec 2, 2006, at 1:56 PM, Vicki Smith wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: James
Definitely near the end. I know this is heresy, but you really might want t=
o consider using coffee extract. I think that most of the subtle notes of a=
ny espresso added will be lost due to the lingering, relatively high heat o=
f the caramels whilst the coffee extract will be more concentrated and end =
up with a stronger coffee flavor in the final product. Unless you add a lot=
 of espresso and end up with really gooey caramels!
  
James in Souther=
n CA
----- Original Message ----
From: Demian Ebert 
To: homeroast 
Sent: Saturday, =
December 2, 2006 10:17:33 AM
Subject: +Coffee caramels?
Morning-
=
Every couple of years we make caramels as holiday gifts for friends and =
family. The recipe is from my wife's grandmother and results in a great car=
amel. The recipe is essentially corn syrup, sugar, heavy cream, and butter.=
 This year we are considering flavoring them with a bit of SMs espresso: Mo=
nkey caramels. I'm a bit leery of cooking the espresso too long and having =
it turn bitter before the caramels are done. One recipe we read on the web =
added their coffee in with the cream. We could add it hot at the very end, =
mix in and pour to cool.
 
So my question to this list is this=
: At what point is it best to add a flavoring such as espresso to a sugar b=
ased candy?  Any candy makers out there?
 
Thanks in advance
=
 
Demian=
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best sp=
am protection around http://mail.yahoo.com

5) From: Jeremy DeFranco
I would steep the espresso in the cream over a slow simmer. I would then
cool the cream, and use in recipe as normal. Just be sure to put a lid over
the cream as it cools, or else the top of the cream will will turn into a
"slime layer". Use a bit more cream than normal, because you might lose some
through the heating and cooling process (you may need to skim off the top
layer after it cools). May take a bit more espresso than normal, because you
will most likely be steeping the espresso at less than boiling temps (too
high a heat, and the cream will separate as the proteins coagulate out).
Also, be sure to send me some, as the final quality of your product is
directly proportional to the number of monkey caramels you send my way (Just
Kidding!). Hope this helps. Cheers!

6) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Sorry, forgot to mention to strain the cream before cooling...
---I would steep the espresso in the cream over a slow simmer. I would then
cool the cream, and use in recipe as normal. Just be sure to put a lid over
the cream as it cools, or else the top of the cream will will turn into a
"slime layer". Use a bit more cream than normal, because you might lose some
through the heating and cooling process (you may need to skim off the top
layer after it cools). May take a bit more espresso than normal, because you
will most likely be steeping the espresso at less than boiling temps (too
high a heat, and the cream will separate as the proteins coagulate out).
Also, be sure to send me some, as the final quality of your product is
directly proportional to the number of monkey caramels you send my way (Just
Kidding!). Hope this helps. Cheers!

7) From: Vicki Smith
When I make coffee flavoured yogurt, I bring the milk to boil with my 
roasted beans in it, leave it in the fridge overnight, and then remove 
the beans before making the yogurt in the usual way. It makes lovely 
coffee yogurt. I bet you could do the same thing for making coffee 
flavoured caramels--that is, bring the cream to boil with good roasted 
beans, cool it off overnight, letting the beans steep in the hot cream, 
and then the next day, make the caramels as usual.
v
Lynne wrote:
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8) From: Lynne
I have to try that. Haven't made yogurt in a while. Coffee flavored 
sound delish!
Lynne
On Dec 2, 2006, at 4:09 PM, Vicki Smith wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Great idea- continue to steep the grinds as it cools, and then strain
after...
---that is, bring the cream to boil with good roasted
beans, cool it off overnight, letting the beans steep in the hot cream,
and then the next day, make the caramels as usual.

10) From: Vicki Smith
Jeremy--I didn't grind the beans at all--used the whole beans.
v
Jeremy DeFranco wrote:
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11) From: Lynne
Would think grinding would work better.
Man, I REALLY want some now...
L.
On Dec 2, 2006, at 5:02 PM, Vicki Smith wrote:
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12) From: John F Coffey
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Hmmm  now you've got me thinking ICE CREAM ..
--John
On Dec 2, 2006, at 2:30 PM, Lynne wrote:
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--------------
   John F. Coffey
   Email - john
   P.O. Box 524			
   Blaine, WA  98231
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Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
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	charsetO-8859-1
Hmmm  now you've got me =
thinking ICE CREAM ..
--John On Dec 2, 2006, at 2:30 PM, Lynne wrote:
Would think grinding would work better. Man, I = REALLY want some now... L. On Dec 2, = 2006, at 5:02 PM, Vicki Smith wrote: vJeremy DeFranco wrote: = Great idea- continue to = steep the grinds as it cools, and then strainafter...---that is, = bring the cream to boil with good roastedbeans, = cool it off overnight, letting the beans steep in the hot = cream,and then the next day, make the = caramels as usual. homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = --------------  John F. = Coffey  Email - john  P.O. Box 524 =   Blaine, WA  98231


= = --Apple-Mail-1--38396353--

13) From: Vicki Smith
Well, for the yogurt, the whole beans worked well, and it avoids that 
whole straining through cheese cloth part. A regular strainer worked 
just fine.
vicki
Lynne wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Vicki Smith
It was actually an ice cream recipe that led me to trying it with yogurt.
v
John F Coffey wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: raymanowen
Here's one I've thought of but not yet tried- Try using your confection as
the vehicle for some Turkish ground beans.
Use any coffee except one-
You really don't want your guests lining up for the key to your sandbox
after they consume your new dessert concoction!
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

16) From: Demian Ebert
Thanks for all the replies.
We did a test batch yesterday and I thought I'd pass on the preliminary
results. For this was a half batch (1/2 cup butter, cup each sugar, corn
syrup and cream) we added 4 teaspoons of espresso with the second cream
addition. The texture was changing rapidly as the final temperature was
reached. The resulting caramels were a bit harder than usual, but not too
hard. The coffee flavor was not cooked or bitter, but also very faint.
Today's experiment will be another half batch with more espresso
(2 tablespoons) and cooked to a slightly lower temperatures to account for
the water.
I kind of liked the coffee-infused cream idea, but Sheila thought it was an
extra step that may not be necessary with a slight temperature adjustment.
Stay tuned for round two.
Demian


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