HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Bread machine brand preference (5 msgs / 90 lines)
1) From: Kris McN
Ok you guys, you've got me thinking I want to try the HG/DB approach, but I
like the idea of using a bread machine to aid in stirring.  I stopped by the
thrift store on the way home and they have 4 different machines all for
$9.99 each: 2 different models of Toastmaster, a Welbilt,
aaaaaaaand....another brand I can't remember (not a Sunbeam) (not enough
coffee today, obviously!).  They all look about the same size and basic
structure.  I have zero experience with bread machines for any purpose, so
any insight would be helpful.  Any brand-preference opinions/experience?
There are a couple of other thrift stores in town I could check for other
brands as well.  Are there features I should look/look out for?
Kris McN

2) From: Vicki Smith
What you want is a model that will stir the beans for around 20 minutes 
on the dough cycle, which is more than long enough for a 1-1.5 pound 
roast. If they won't let you plug it in and time it in the store, then 
you can write down the model numbers and look for the manual on-line.
I have used various machines, and they all stirred long enough. I know 
that amongst them, one was a Toastmaster. As you know, mine is a Sunbeam.
The other thing to check out is the post assembly the stirring paddle 
sits on. I understand that some bread machines have some sort of plastic 
assembly. Mine is all metal, which has to be an advantage, as we are 
talking hot-hot-hot.
vicki
Kris McN wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Bill Morgan
A couple more things to consider:
The stirring arm itself.  I have two "identical" machines, but one has a
plastic arm and one has metal.  (They're Welbilt, I think.)
How the cooking chamber comes out, and what kind of hole is at the bottom.
Mine have a kind of bayonet mount, so removal requires gloves to grab the
chamber itself, twist it, and lift.  Then a fair number of the beans would
run out of the hole in the bottom.  The alternative is picking the whole
thing up to pour the beans out.
Obviously I'm not doing heat gun roasting in these things yet.  That will
require significant surgery, or else hitting the thrift stores for a
different design.
HTH,
Bill
On 12/5/06, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Kris McN
Thanks for the advice, Bill and Vicki!  I'm going to go after work today and
turn things on, poke and prod, and examine more closely.
On 12/6/06, Bill Morgan  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Captain CowPie
If you can find a machine that has two stirring arms, with a pan that more =
closely resembles a bread baking pan, they are the  best for for roasting. =
The beans are more spread out and you can actually do a larger roast with i=
t.
I have only seen the one that I purchased, and I keep looking for another o=
ne just in case anything happens to this one.
Vince
<Snip>
 I like the idea of using a bread machine to aid in stirring.  I stopped =
by the thrift store on the way home and they have 4 different machines all =
for $9.99 each: 2 different models of Toastmaster, a Welbilt, aaaaaaaand...=
.another brand I can't remember (not a Sunbeam) (not enough coffee today, o=
bviously!).  They all look about the same size and basic structure.  I =
have zero experience with bread machines for any purpose, so any insight wo=
uld be helpful.  Any brand-preference opinions/experience?  There are a=
 couple of other thrift stores in town I could check for other brands as we=
ll.  Are there features I should look/look out for?
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest