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Topic: Gelato: was RE:Coffee ice cream, which 1st was RE: +Horse-Green Stripe Chocolate cake frosting.......mmm good! (6 msgs / 315 lines)
1) From: Jeremy DeFranco
All this talk about Ice Cream. Well, I just had my first Gelato last week,
and I just can not get over that silky texture! Anyone know the difference
between Gelato and IceCream? I read somewhere that it involves no eggs (not
a frozen custard), and the incorporation of an Italian Mirengue (sugar taken
to soft-ball stage slowly drizzled into egg whites as they are being
whipped), however I don't know what proportions of Italian Mirengue and
Cream to use. I tried once to make a Gelato w/this Italian Mirengue and
cream, but it still came out the same texture of ice-cream. I realized
immediately it was doomed to be a failure when I mixed the Italian Mirengue-
which was nice and fluffy, and silky smooth- into the cream, and saw the
beautifully whipped mirengue dissolve to an air-less cream plus sugar plus
air-less eggwhite mixture right before my eyes. Maybe I used too much cream?
Should I whip the cream at all first? Any tips??

2) From: John F Coffey
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Found this recipe by google --- should be easy to modify it for some  
coffee beans that you have roasted:
Coffee Gelato recipe
2/3 cup sugar
4  egg yolks
1 cup milk; at room temperature
1/8 teaspoon salt
4 teaspoons instant coffee
1 cup heavy cream
Beat the sugar and egg yolks together until pale yellow and very thick.
Slowly add the milk, beating gently to avoid a build-up of foam. Stir in
the salt.  Transfer mixture to the top of a double boiler with an inch
of boiling water in the bottom half. Regulate heat so water remains at a
low boil, and stir continuously 8 minutes. Custard will thicken enough
to coat the spoon, and surface foam will disappear. Immediately remove
top of double boiler and set it in a large bowl of cold water. Stir 2
minutes to cool custard somewhat. Then transfer it to a bowl and add the
coffee, stirring to dissolve it thoroughly. Cover and set in
refrigerator to chill thoroughly. Also chill heavy cream. When ready to
proceed, whip cream into soft peaks and stir it into coffee custard.
Transfer mixture to ice cream machine and proceed according to machine's
directions.
On Dec 7, 2006, at 10:30 AM, Jeremy DeFranco wrote:
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--------------
   John F. Coffey
   Email - john
   P.O. Box 524			
   Blaine, WA  98231
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Found this recipe by google --- =
should be easy to modify it for some coffee beans that you have =
roasted:
Coffee = Gelato recipe 2/3 cup sugar 4  egg yolks 1 = cup milk; at room temperature 1/8 teaspoon salt 4 = teaspoons instant coffee 1 cup heavy cream
Beat the sugar and egg = yolks together until pale yellow and very thick.Slowly add = the milk, beating gently to avoid a build-up of foam. Stir = inthe salt.  Transfer mixture to the top of a double boiler = with an inchof boiling water in the bottom half. Regulate = heat so water remains at alow boil, and stir continuously 8 = minutes. Custard will thicken enoughto coat the spoon, and = surface foam will disappear. Immediately removetop of double = boiler and set it in a large bowl of cold water. Stir = 2minutes to cool custard somewhat. Then transfer it to a bowl = and add thecoffee, stirring to dissolve it thoroughly. Cover = and set inrefrigerator to chill thoroughly. Also chill heavy = cream. When ready toproceed, whip cream into soft peaks and = stir it into coffee custard.Transfer mixture to ice cream = machine and proceed according to = machine'sdirections. On Dec 7, 2006, at 10:30 AM, = Jeremy DeFranco wrote:
All this = talk about Ice Cream. Well, I just had my first Gelato last week, and I = just can not get over that silky texture! Anyone know the difference = between Gelato and IceCream? I read somewhere that it involves no eggs = (not a frozen custard), and the incorporation of an Italian Mirengue = (sugar taken to soft-ball stage slowly drizzled into egg whites as they = are being whipped), however I don't know what proportions of Italian = Mirengue and Cream to use. I tried once to make a Gelato w/this Italian = Mirengue and cream, but it still came out the same texture of ice-cream. = I realized immediately it was doomed to be a failure when I mixed the = Italian Mirengue- which was nice and fluffy, and silky smooth- into the = cream, and saw the beautifully whipped mirengue dissolve to an air-less = cream plus sugar plus air-less eggwhite mixture right before my eyes. = Maybe I used too much cream? Should I whip the cream at all first? Any = tips?? --------------  John F. = Coffey  Email - john  P.O. Box 524 =   Blaine, WA  98231


= = --Apple-Mail-3-378572919--

3) From: bb
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
One of the big differences between gelato and ice cream is actually the
holding temperature.  A gelato freezer is not as cold as an ice cream
freezer, and it results in the softer consistency.
 
You are also correct in that gelato traditionally has no eggs.  If any of
you are in the NYC area, you owe it to yourself to head down to the lower
east side to il laboratorio del gelato.  Amazing stuff.  It was one of my
must sees when I went there in early November (after several coffee shops of
course).  
From: Jeremy DeFranco [mailto:jeremy.defranco] 
Sent: Thursday, December 07, 2006 12:31 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Gelato: was RE:Coffee ice cream, which 1st was RE: +Horse-Green
Stripe Chocolate cake frosting.......mmm good!
All this talk about Ice Cream. Well, I just had my first Gelato last week,
and I just can not get over that silky texture! Anyone know the difference
between Gelato and IceCream? I read somewhere that it involves no eggs (not
a frozen custard), and the incorporation of an Italian Mirengue (sugar taken
to soft-ball stage slowly drizzled into egg whites as they are being
whipped), however I don't know what proportions of Italian Mirengue and
Cream to use. I tried once to make a Gelato w/this Italian Mirengue and
cream, but it still came out the same texture of ice-cream. I realized
immediately it was doomed to be a failure when I mixed the Italian Mirengue-
which was nice and fluffy, and silky smooth- into the cream, and saw the
beautifully whipped mirengue dissolve to an air-less cream plus sugar plus
air-less eggwhite mixture right before my eyes. Maybe I used too much cream?
Should I whip the cream at all first? Any tips?? 

4) From: Lynne
Oh... gelato! I love it. I have to get some every time I'm in Boston's 
North End (our 'Little Italy').
That's one thing I never made - however, I do know that it's not 
supposed to be cream that's used - the fat ratio is much lower. But 
I've never made any.
I'm sure there's someone here who has, though.
Lynne
On Dec 7, 2006, at 1:30 PM, Jeremy DeFranco wrote:
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5) From: Sandy Andina
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Believe it or not, even though it has very little "overrun" (air),  
gelato is lower in fat and calories than conventional "premium" ice  
cream.
On Dec 7, 2006, at 12:45 PM, bb wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-87-379389330
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Believe it or not, even though =
it has very little "overrun" (air), gelato is lower in fat and calories =
than conventional "premium" ice cream.
On Dec 7, 2006, at =
12:45 PM, bb wrote:
One of the big differences = between gelato and ice cream is actually the holding temperature.  A = gelato freezer is not as cold as an ice cream freezer, and it results in = the softer consistency.   You are also correct in that gelato = traditionally has no eggs.  If any of you are in the NYC area, you owe = it to yourself to head down to the lower east side to il laboratorio del = gelato.  Amazing stuff.  It was one of my must sees when I went = there in early November (after several coffee shops of = course). From: Jeremy DeFranco [mailto:jeremy.defranco= ] Sent: Thursday, December 07, 2006 12:31 = PM To: homeroast= s.com Subject: Gelato: was RE:Coffee ice cream, which 1st = was RE: +Horse-Green Stripe Chocolate cake frosting.......mmm = good! All this talk about Ice Cream. = Well, I just had my first Gelato last week, and I just can not get over = that silky texture! Anyone know the difference between Gelato and = IceCream? I read somewhere that it involves no eggs (not a frozen = custard), and the incorporation of an Italian Mirengue (sugar taken to = soft-ball stage slowly drizzled into egg whites as they are being = whipped), however I don't know what proportions of Italian Mirengue and = Cream to use. I tried once to make a Gelato w/this Italian Mirengue and = cream, but it still came out the same texture of ice-cream. I realized = immediately it was doomed to be a failure when I mixed the Italian = Mirengue- which was nice and fluffy, and silky smooth- into the cream, = and saw the beautifully whipped mirengue dissolve to an air-less cream = plus sugar plus air-less eggwhite mixture right before my eyes. Maybe I = used too much cream? Should I whip the cream at all first? Any tips?? = Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-87-379389330--

6) From: scott miller
Ohhhh Gelato.
That's name of a friend's shop. He makes all the gelati & sorbetti on
premises. Really wonderful stuff.
Traditionally, there's no cream in gelato, though sometimes small amounts
are used in home recipes. There is far less over-run (less air incorporated)
and that accounts for the dense texture.
Whenever I visit my friend, he always has some interesting flavors: passion
fruit, mango, green apple, coconut, etc.
cheers,
Scott
On 12/7/06, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
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