HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Pets and Roasting (22 msgs / 582 lines)
1) From: Aaron
Here's another off the wall?
I am looking to get a bird as a pet (cocatoo probably)
anyways, from what I remember before, birds are very susceptable to smoke.
I roast indoors, sometimes multiple batches.
Is this possibly something that might cause problems for the bird,  ie 
are there any other bird owners out there who also roast inside and does 
it affect your feathered friend or do you keep em locked in a seperate 
room or what?
I don't want to do a monty python dead parrot skit  here :)
thanks
Aaron

2) From: Alchemist John
OK, aside from the discussion side of this, I can't help.  But I have 
been nursing a goose back to health for the past month and that same 
thought crossed my mind.  Consequently I moved my roasted setup 
somewhere else and did not even take the chance.
I have a vague memory is that they are highly susceptible to CO 
poisoning and so are a great (albeit terminal) CO monitor before it 
reaches human toxicity.
At 07:02 12/9/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

3) From: Tom Ulmer
I recall a previous mother-in-law who kept macaws and cockatoos. This was
back in the days when cigarette smoking was generally accepted and there
would be times when the house would be full of smokers. In fact I remember
her loading one in the passenger seat of her yellow 911 and heading across
the country while smoking merrily along the way. The bird seemed no worse
for it. It seems to me that she was much more concerned about the birds
being exposed to cold temperatures or people with colds or flu.

4) From: Steven Sobel
Aaron,
We have a blue and gold macaw.  When I roast, I am about 20-30 feet away
from our bird and she doesn't seem to mind it at all.  From what I recall,
smoke, per se, doesn't bother the birds if it is "natural" versus smoke from
plastic/teflon which can be toxic to these animals.  And obviously the
amount of smoke is also a factor.  When I roast it isn't to Italian or
Spanish.
Steve
On 12/9/06, Aaron  wrote:
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5) From: John F Coffey
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I have two birds .. a grey and a scarlet.  Both are about 50 feet  
from where I roast under the stove hood.  Both are making it known  
they want breakfast as I type.
And I sometimes cook on non-stick pans too... they seem to survive  
that one too.
--John
On Dec 9, 2006, at 7:02 AM, Aaron wrote:
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--------------
   John F. Coffey
   Email - john
   P.O. Box 524			
   Blaine, WA  98231
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I have two birds .. a grey and a =
scarlet.  Both are about 50 feet from where I roast under the stove =
hood.  Both are making it known they want breakfast as I =
type.  
And I = sometimes cook on non-stick pans too... they seem to survive that one = too.
--John On Dec 9, 2006, at 7:02 AM, Aaron wrote:
Here's another off the wall? I am = looking to get a bird as a pet (cocatoo probably)anyways, from what I remember before, birds are very = susceptable to smoke.I roast indoors, sometimes = multiple batches. Is this possibly something that might cause problems = for the bird,  ie are = there any other bird owners out there who also roast inside and does it = affect your feathered friend or do you keep em locked in a seperate room = or what? I don't want to do a monty python dead parrot = skit  here :) Aaronhomeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = --------------  John F. = Coffey  Email - john  P.O. Box 524 =   Blaine, WA  98231


= = --Apple-Mail-1-544451261--

6) From: Brett Mason
Hey John,
I just looked at your address - I was up there this past April for my
son's graduation from TWU - wish I had known - we coould've roasted
some together!
Best regards,
Brett
On 12/9/06, John F Coffey  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

7) From: Michael Dhabolt
Aaron,
I have a blue and gold Macaw, a Cockatoo and recently departed African
Grey.  No ill effects from roasting.
Mike (just plain)

8) From: Fancye9876
Gosh, I don't know about cooking smoke.  I have had a cockatoo for 20  years. 
 I do know that overheating anything in a teflon pan is deadly for  birds.  I 
have roasted in my kitchen but the bird is in the other room and  I did not 
produce a great deal of smoke. Perhaps you could put the bird on  a play stand 
in another room when you are roasting.  Cockatoos are  wonderful friendly 
birds but beware they can be very demanding.  It is like  living with a 2 year old 
forever.  It's always me, me, me as that is their  mentality.  
 
Susan

9) From: Fancye9876
I think the problem with the teflon is if it gets to hot like if you burn  
something in it.  I also use a teflon skillet once in a while.  Just  don't walk 
away and let something burn or overheat the pan and it should be  ok.
 
Susan

10) From: Michael Dhabolt
Aaron,
I could not in good conscience not add the following to someone thinking
about getting one of the large 'hook bill' true parrots.
WARNING - this is not an acquisition to be taken lightly.  Study a bit
before making the commitment.  These birds are not 'pets', they are
'companions' in the truest sense of the word.  These birds require
companionship and attention thru their long lifetime,  they will outlive
you.  A substantial portion of large bird acquisitions end up being farmed
out from the original owner to someone more suited to providing this level
of attention - some don't and live a heartbreaking life.
If you decide to commit to this level of responsibility, by all means find a
bird that is still at the hand feeding age (very young) and get involved
with it at this stage in its life.  Parrots imprint to an individual (their
significant other) early in their life, some breeds are more or less
tolerant of other people in their life (example: Macaws specifically are
usually more social with other people).
As a person who has maintained a menagerie consisting of Ferrets to Horses
and always containing several dogs and cats - all my life, I have found the
relationship with a large Parrot is many orders of magnitude different, more
demanding and more personal than that with any other animal.
Enjoying a conversation with my friend Bert, a Blue and Gold Macaw while
enjoying a restritto of SO Misty Valley - life is good!
Mike (just plain)

11) From: Fancye9876
Mike, you are so right on. I also have had the same assortment of critters  
and am now down to a few chickens, 2 dogs, 1 cat and the cockatoo, oh and 3  
desert tortoises.  We have had our cockatoo now for 20 years and she is  still 
like she was when we first got her.  Cockatoos are one of the few  that like to 
be petted and attached to you.  My husband and I are both in  our 60's now 
and find it very difficult to meet her demands. I am sure she will  outlive us, 
so we are going to have to find her a good home in the not to  distant future.
 
Susan
 

12) From: Sean Cary
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Ditto - we had a cockatoo we brought home from Okinawa - it required A LOT
of time and care.  We got it right before I went on a deployment, and my
wife and the bird bonded.  Fast forward 5 months, I come home and turns out
the bird is a female, and really likes me.  Bites my wife through the ear,
the toe, finger etc.
We took her home to Fla, and ended up giving away over 700.00 in bird
because she needed tons of time and care.  They are really time
intensive.and they make a MESS.
Sean M. Cary
Major USMC
Tempus Fugit Memento Mori  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Michael Dhabolt
Sent: Saturday, December 09, 2006 2:25 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Pets and Roasting
Aaron,
I could not in good conscience not add the following to someone thinking
about getting one of the large 'hook bill' true parrots.
WARNING - this is not an acquisition to be taken lightly.  Study a bit
before making the commitment.  These birds are not 'pets', they are
'companions' in the truest sense of the word.  These birds require
companionship and attention thru their long lifetime,  they will outlive
you.  A substantial portion of large bird acquisitions end up being farmed
out from the original owner to someone more suited to providing this level
of attention - some don't and live a heartbreaking life. 
If you decide to commit to this level of responsibility, by all means find a
bird that is still at the hand feeding age (very young) and get involved
with it at this stage in its life.  Parrots imprint to an individual (their
significant other) early in their life, some breeds are more or less
tolerant of other people in their life (example: Macaws specifically are
usually more social with other people). 
As a person who has maintained a menagerie consisting of Ferrets to Horses
and always containing several dogs and cats - all my life, I have found the
relationship with a large Parrot is many orders of magnitude different, more
demanding and more personal than that with any other animal. 
Enjoying a conversation with my friend Bert, a Blue and Gold Macaw while
enjoying a restritto of SO Misty Valley - life is good!
Mike (just plain)

13) From: Chad
Lots of birds in this group! I too have an African Grey along with cats, 
a bearded dragon and a Sulcatta tortoise (past pets included ferrets, 
sugar gliders and many reptiles). My wife works with animals (wild and 
domestic) so we often are rehabbing racoons, baby deer, owls, hawks, etc 
in our pet room. When they aren't here you can bet we picked up a litter 
of kittens from the pound and raise them to 2lbs so they don't get put 
down for being to small to adopt out. Right now we have four kittens and 
their mom. They get to go back to the pound to get adopted out soon. 3 
of the 4 have reached two pounds. We got them at 1 week old.
Chad
Running Springs, CA
On Sat, 9 Dec 2006 11:54am, Fancye9876 wrote:
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14) From: Sharon Allsup
On 12/9/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
My roasting is an iRoast2 right now, and I've roasted with a falcon
sitting on one hand.  No problem at all with the bird other than some
initial freaking out from the noise, and wanting to perch on the
(hothothotHOT!!!) ducting of the exhaust arrangement.  The smoke is
vented to the outside so there's never more than a tiny tendril or two
escaping out from the top, not enough to be a problem.
If you're venting the smoke to the outside, I'd say you're likely OK
from a bird point of view.  In my experience, roasting makes so danged
much smoke you need to have it outside or the smoke alarm goes off and
the house smells for *days*.
The birdfeeder outside is located directly "in the line of fire" of
the exhaust coming from my stove air vent.  When roasting (exhaust is
always on when roasting), I see big billowing clouds of smoke wafting
right across the birdfeeding corner of the deck.  By that stage of the
roast, the birds have long since taken off.  The smoke annoys then,
but doesn't seem to be hurting them:  I'm not finding any little
corpses or observing any distressed birds.  They come back in droves
as soon as the roast is over.
I'd be more concerned with the vapors from a roasting setup that
involves a non-stick-coated pan.  Most bread machine pans and some
popper chambers are lined with non-stick coating (Teflon or similar),
and some of those have been shown to release gases that are highly
toxic to some bird.  I'm not sure if the roasting temperatures are
high enough -- don't take my word one way or the other.
Noise-wise, when I raised psitticines years ago, they loved yelling
and squawking when there were loud noises going on.  It was long
before I got into roasting, but a conure that'd screech with joy in
competition with hubby's loud hotair popper would probably be thrilled
to duet with an iRoast!
I second what the others are saying about cockatoos as major major
attention hogs and timesinks.  They're fantastic loving birds, but not
for someone without gobs of time and ideally having had some previous
psitticine experience.  It's a huge commitment.  In a way, even more
so than falconry, because since I fly only passagers I can always
simply return my bird back to the wild -- and if it's not a passager,
it can still be given away with nowhere near the personal attachment
issues that parrots develop.
-Sharon

15) From: Michael Guterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
We have cats and birds.  Cockatoos require so much attention.  It can be 
quite difficult.  Our Umbrella died in a tragic accident, but she was 
like having a baby around the house.  She also coated everything with 
white powder.  I roast (using an outside vented 400 CFM range hood) in 
the room with a couple of parrots, and it has never seemed to bother 
them.  I do not use Teflon based cookware.  If you overheat it, it will 
kill birds instantly.  My Yellow Nape is much easier to deal with than 
the Cockatoo.  She wants (we declared her a she so that we could name 
her Abigail) to be held and petted, but not all the time.  She is pretty 
happy just being with us.  I got her while she was still hand feeding, 
and we have had her about 25 years.
I am moving in about ten days.  I am crazy busy and also don't know how 
quickly I will get my internet service up.  In case I am missing at the 
time, everybody should have a wonderful holiday season.
Michael
Fancye9876 wrote:
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16) From: Captain CowPie
My biggest concern are the beans that fall when I am cooling my roasts outs=
ide. I have two black labs who like to eat them, and I know that caffeine i=
s not good for them. I try to keep them away from them, but they are pretty=
 good at finding them.
Vince

17) From: Cameron Forde
Not sure about the caffeine, but I'm pretty sure that the theobromide
in coffee and chocolate is not good for your dogs.
Cameron
On 12/10/06, Captain CowPie  wrote:
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18) From: Ed Needham
It's a caffeine to weight ratio thing.  If a very tiny dog gets into a bag 
of beans and ingests a bunch of them, then it might make it sick.  A dog the 
size of a lab would have to ingest way more than what he'll scoop up off the 
roasting floor before any ill effects would be noticed.  I can't remember 
the fatal dose for a large dog, but it's pretty close to what it would take 
to kill a human.  The problem is that dogs don't metabolize caffeine and 
more specifically theobromine (the stimulant in chocolate) very fast and it 
stays in their blood stream for a long time before being filtered out by the 
kidneys.  A candy bar can be enough to make a small dog very sick or even 
cause death.  In a large dog, you would likely not even notice symptoms. 
Coffee caffeine is not as dangerous as theobromine.  My goldens eat coffee 
beans all the time around my roaster with no obvious symptoms.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

19) From: David Schooley
My sheltie likes to snag dropped coffee beans, so I did some reading  
a while back. You are correct that theobromine is the substance that  
makes dogs sick when they eat chocolate. Theobromine is not found in  
coffee, and caffeine is slightly less toxic to dogs. Too much  
caffeine is bad, but I am not going to get concerned about a few  
beans consumed by a 35 pound sheltie. (He is a big sheltie.) The  
amount of theobromine contained in a few ounces of baking chocolate  
would probably kill him.
On Dec 10, 2006, at 10:10 PM, Cameron Forde wrote:
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20) From: Claus Thøgersen
Hi,
My current guidedog a german shephard (somethings wrong with the spelling) 
does not at all care for neither roasted nor  green beans. My last labrador 
tried both types of beans but even though I have not known a more hungry dog 
he allmost gave  up on beans, that is he always seemed to forget that he 
really did not like to eat  them, and just had to try one more time!
Claus Thøgersen
----- Oprindelig meddelelse ----- 
Fra: "David Schooley" 
Til: 
Sendt: 11. december 2006 07:41
Emne: Re: +Pets and Roasting
<Snip>

21) From: Scjgb3
Let me add that my pit bull  (Boaz) has a thing for coffee beans too, but 
only  the roasted ones. While I am roasting he will stay right by my side until I 
put  them in the cooler, he doesn't care for the noise,  But he loves those  
beans though. 
 
scjgb3

22) From: Jeremy DeFranco
I guess all this means that I shouldn't put coffee beans in the bird feeder.
So much for trying to hook-up your local winged-fauna w/some world class
seeds. One would initially think it would help them fly south much quicker,
stay warmer, and help them to produce more offspring! : )


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