HomeRoast Digest


Topic: 5 Gallon Bean Cooler Question (11 msgs / 167 lines)
1) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Anyone use a shop vac and 5 gallon bucket for cooling beans? I'm wandering
what one would use to cut a hole in the side of the bucket. I know that
material can be pretty tough, and I don't have many gadgets on hand. I also
wander what is the best colander/sieve to install in the lid? Do you have to
use something with holes only on the bottom to allow for better suction, or
could you use a mesh colander with mesh on the bottom and sides? Thanks,
Jeremy

2) From: Eddie Dove
Jeremy,
<Snip>
If you have a drill, you can buy an inexpensive "hole saw" that can cut many
diameter holes.  Used a lot for cutting doorknob holes in doors.
<Snip>
Holes in bottom to generated the suction / concentrated airflow to cool the
beans.  You can use a metal bowl and again, drill holes in the bottom.
I have not done this, but I have been reading up on it and do use quite a
few tools.
Hope this helps ...
Eddie
On 12/9/06, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Laura Micucci
Hi Jeremy,
   
  This is great advise from Eddie.  I would just add make sure you drill many smaller holes in the mixing bowl so the beans don't get stuck in them (speaking from experience).  For the hole in the bucket I just put the nozzle of my vac up to the bucket and traced it and then used a hole saw.  By the way, my mixing bowl was big enough that I didn't use the lid to the bucket.  It fit perfectly and this system did a great job of cooling the beans down quick.  I have not tried it with a large batch of beans because I read somewhere that the heat may burn the vacuum out.  Not sure if this is true or not but I didn't want to take the chance. Good luck!
Eddie Dove  wrote:
  Jeremy,
<Snip>
If you have a drill, you can buy an inexpensive "hole saw" that can cut many diameter holes.  Used a lot for cutting doorknob holes in doors. 
<Snip>
Holes in bottom to generated the suction / concentrated airflow to cool the beans.  You can use a metal bowl and again, drill holes in the bottom. 
I have not done this, but I have been reading up on it and do use quite a few tools.
Hope this helps ...
Eddie
  On 12/9/06, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:  Anyone use a shop vac and 5 gallon bucket for cooling beans? I'm wandering what one would use to cut a hole in the side of the bucket. I know that material can be pretty tough, and I don't have many gadgets on hand. I also wander what is the best colander/sieve to install in the lid? Do you have to use something with holes only on the bottom to allow for better suction, or could you use a mesh colander with mesh on the bottom and sides? Thanks, Jeremy 
                 Laura           Making the world a better place one bean at a time.
   

4) From: jdwalk6359@earthlink.net
i have one i purchased already made that and a sc/to, both work great the cooler will cool 3/4 lb to room temp in about a minute

5) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Thanks all for your help! I do have a drill. I'll check out the hole saw.
Cheers!

6) From: Chad
Pictures?
Chad
On Sat, 9 Dec 2006 9:16pm, Laura Micucci wrote:
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
 
<Snip>

7) From: Chad
Pictures?
Chad
On Sat, 9 Dec 2006 9:16pm, jdwalk6359 wrote:
<Snip>
 
<Snip>

8) From: Matt Henkel
On Sat, Dec 09, 2006 at 11:10:04PM -0500, Jeremy DeFranco wrote:
<Snip>
Well, I don't suck air through my setup, I blow it with an electric
sweeper, but the setup would largely work for you:
I "cut" the hole in a 5g bucket with a hot chunk of copper.  I know,
that's probably a useless admission but I'm throwing it out there.
Sure, I was planning on using a Dremel, but there was a blow torch and
some scrap copper at hand.
For the bean bed I actually picked up some window screen from Home Depot
and screwed it into the bucket.  If you plan on sticking with sucking
air through the beans you can leave the screen flat, if you want to toss
the beans by blowing air through them I recommend slanting the the mesh
so they tumble around.
Of course if you're going to blow the beans I recommend building a lid.
I simply cut a hole (this time with the Dremel) in a bucket lid and then
filled the hole with more window screen.  I didn't make the screen
taught though, it's more of a wind sock design to help trap chaff.
A picture (albeit terrible and sans lid) of the cooler (with my other roasting gear)
is here:http://blog.menagerie.cc/img/roast-setup.png~/Matt

9) From: Laura Micucci
Hi Chad,
   
  pictures, hmmm,  I disassembled mine, sorry.  Now I use the bucket as a stand for my box fan, the shop vac is back to it's former job of tearing down spider condos, and the mixing bowl...where is that mixing bowl?  Anyhow, I got the idea from a link from this site with pictures I believe.  I'm sure someone out there knows what I'm talking about and might have the link.... someone?
Chad  wrote:
  Pictures?
Chad
On Sat, 9 Dec 2006 9:16pm, Laura Micucci wrote:
<Snip>Laura           Making the world a better place one bean at a time.
   

10) From: Chad
If you have any tools, a jigsaw is your #1 bet.
Chad
On Sun, 10 Dec 2006 11:18am, Matt Henkel wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: john nanavati
If you're going all "home depot" on the roasting process anyway ;- ) after
cutting with the hole saw, you could also use wire mesh that you use
to patch a holes in plaster to keep the beans from getting sucked in.
On 12/9/06, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest