HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Why a Bread machine? (10 msgs / 272 lines)
1) From: Angelo
I'm wondering why are people going through so much trouble to use a 
BM, w/wo HG. It seems to be a bulky, heavy unit and unless you get it 
in a thrift shop, it's kinda expensive. I don't see any advantage to 
it over just buying a StirChef http://www.crazysaver.com/Store/SC200R.html($10-15) and attaching it 
to an ordinary pot. It can then be used as a stovetop cooker and/or 
with a heat gun.It can be folded and put away in a drawer. Oh, and it 
can serve double duty, stirring sauces and soups.
The unit uses 4 AA batteries, revolves at 15 rpm and I had it pushing 
500gr of green beans around. It sits on top of a pot so a heat gun 
can be aimed between its arms as heat is applied (or not) from any 
heating element on the bottom...
Build a stand for a cheap pan with a hole drilled through its center 
and place the StirChef underneath and viola! you replace the 
stircrazy component of the Turbocrazy.
I will be honest and say I haven't yet done a roast with it (I have 
no need of such large roasts), but I can't see any reason why this 
shouldn't produce good roasts..
I'm hoping someone on the list will do a proof of concept build...
Ciao,
A+

2) From: stereoplegic
i'm hoping you'll read my entire reply. i know it starts off kinda 
negative, but closer to the end you'll find that i do see some hope for 
this little gizmo.
angelon wrote:
<Snip>
bulky, yes, but that bulk also means insulation. as for expense, it 
seems most people using a BM for coffee roasting are getting them in 
thrift shops (i'm checking one out at a local thrift shop, hoping it 
will drop below it's current 12.99 price soon), or using units they 
already own (bought originally for their intended purpose: bread. also, 
bread machines have very strong motors (kneading dough isn't always easy).
<Snip>
plastic (even high temp plastic) doesn't usually fare well in the kind 
of heat req'd for coffee roasting (hence the turbocrazy (SC/TO) metal 
shaft mod). on the plus side, the plastic stir paddles look like they 
could easily be replaced by metal. as for the top, make it the bottom 
(you mention drilling a hole and using it as a turbocrazy motor further 
down), and heat shouldn't be a problem.
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that's kinda cool. my roasting equipment is already taking up way too 
much space.
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batteries fail at the worst possible times (ask any electric guitarist 
who uses effects pedals). luckily, transformer-provided 6-volt dc isn't 
a very difficult mod (wonder how much more than 6v it could handle?).
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very cool.
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again, plastic.
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the metal shaft looks pretty long, that's a plus. as i mentioned before 
about the BM, insulation is nice. add an extra layer (extra pan, ceramic 
plant pot base?), and this could work out very well.
<Snip>
if you do, try it with the beans you'll miss the least at first (vietnam 
robusta, another supplier's beans? (sorry, tom & maria, but i ruined a 
few batches of yours while learning, i'd like to prevent someone else 
from doing the same)).
<Snip>
holidays? (ok, now i'm just nitpicking, jokingly)
<Snip>
hopefully this helps for starters. and hopefully other, more experienced 
(and mechanically inclined) list members will chime in soon.

3) From: Vicki Smith
I can't really imagine applying intense heat to anything with plastic 
parts or that uses batteries, but that just might be me.
Anyone who pays more for a thrift machine bread machine than this 
stirring contraption would have paid too much. My bread machine is 
indeed bulky, and if I had to carry it around, it would be a pain. I 
keep all my bread machine roasting kit on a wheeled metal cart now, also 
a thrift store find. I either use it in my garage, during inclement 
weather, or roll it out and use it on my patio.
It works for me, and it really doesn't seem like very much trouble at all.
vicki
Angelo wrote:
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4) From: Lynne
If this baby lasts (doesn't die out after a couple of months) you've 
saved my arm a lot of wear & tear. Thank you.
Lynne
On Dec 10, 2006, at 12:31 AM, Angelo wrote:
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5) From: Lynne
For some strange reason, every time (rare the times I've been there) 
there is a bread machine for sale in any thrift store around here, it's 
been over priced. Don't get it. Anyway, I'm moving at the end of the 
month, only a couple cities away, but I'll have a better choice thrift 
stores. So I might be able to try the BM/HG setup later.(I may have to 
- the 'new' [electric] stove is far from new, & I don't know how my 
stove top roasting will survive there.)
Lynne
On Dec 10, 2006, at 2:01 AM, Vicki Smith wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Brian Kamnetz
Where are you moving to, Lynne?
Brian
On 12/10/06, Lynne  wrote:
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7) From: Lynne
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Two cities away. Closer to Boston, too. So I won't be Lynne from Lynn 
anymore!
I have yet to actually SIGN the lease yet - so, of course, I'm stressed =
that there'll be SOMETHING that could go wrong (can't help it - the 
Italian genes tend to overpower the Polish ones).
Lynne
On Dec 10, 2006, at 12:12 PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
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thrift
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to
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Two cities away. Closer to Boston, too. So I won't be Lynne from Lynn
anymore!
I have yet to actually SIGN the lease yet - so, of course, I'm
stressed that there'll be SOMETHING that could go wrong (can't help it
- the Italian genes tend to overpower the Polish ones). 
Lynne
On Dec 10, 2006, at 12:12 PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
Where are you moving to, Lynne?
 
Brian
 
On 12/10/06, Lynne
<<0000,0000,EEEElynnebiz>
wrote: For some strange reason, every time (rare the times I've been
there)
there is a bread machine for sale in any thrift store around
here, it's 
been over priced. Don't get it. Anyway, I'm moving at the end of the
month, only a couple cities away, but I'll have a better choice thrift
stores. So I might be able to try the BM/HG setup later.(I may have to
 - the 'new' [electric] stove is far from new, & I don't know how my
stove top roasting will survive there.)
Lynne
=
--Apple-Mail-6-633874555--

8) From: Brian Kamnetz
Lynne,
I'd completely forgotten what part of the country you were in. For some
reason I was thinking you were in the Detroit area.
Sounds like you are really looking forward to the new apartment. Good luck
with the lease and the move.
Brian
On 12/10/06, Lynne  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Lynne
Must be the Polish name! Bet there are some Biziewski's out there - I 
actually had relatives from Grand Rapids.
Thanks for the good wishes. I don't have a lease, yet I've ended up 
moving in December AGAIN. Argh - I hate moving, and I esp. hate it 
around the holidays.
Lynne
On Dec 10, 2006, at 12:47 PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>

10) From: Angelo
At  12/10/2006 01:28 AM, you wrote:
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I don't think a motor has to be very strong to roast a couple of 
pounds of green beans. Don't forget that as the beans roast they get lighter...
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You are correct that the vanes can be easily replaced by metal ones 
if needs be. As to the heat affecting the unit itself, one could put 
a shield between the unit and the top of the pot, a la Back-2-Basics 
Stovetop Roaster. As a matter of fact, one could use this unit to 
replace the gear mechanism on those roasters, using the same vanes.
<Snip>
As I live in a tiny NYC apt, this is a big concern. I suppose if you 
live in a house with a garage , porch and yard, the BM would be ok...
<Snip>
That mod is a snap for the wizards we have on the list :-) . Besides, 
what musician doesn't have at least two of everything with them on gigs?
<Snip>
I'm not sure of the melting temp of this plastic. A roaster doesn't 
seem to have to get higher than 500F. The thermoplastic engineers 
will have to weigh in on this...
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The rod is 8" long and is 1/4" sq. Because the rod is not connected 
to the unit (it rides in a channel), it can be as long as you would 
need. It seems to be a standard 1/4" square metal rod.
<Snip>
But not necessary
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Overkill, IMHO. The idea is to cut down on objects and mods needed. I 
know that this concept is abhorrent to many on the list, but, like I 
said, I live in a small space. Less is more.
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I drink even less coffee. Gotta leave room for those egg nogs and 
holiday "cheer":-)
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