HomeRoast Digest


Topic: The Slippery Slope (6 msgs / 153 lines)
1) From: bb
After doing some extensive reading last night, clearing my head of the
Virgin Roast Defeat with a 7 mile run and returning to the smell of freshly
roasted coffee, I came to the realization that...
A) my kitchen is dark
B) my printer prints light
C) I didn't over roast the coffee to the degree I thought I had.  Clearly
the popcorn style cracking was 1st crack, and as that slowed down or began
to stop was the moment I reached the panic point.
That said, I figured I'd do a second roast last night of Ethiopia
Yirgacheffe - Moledina 3993 and brave out the roasting process longer.  The
poor Ethiopians would not be proud.  I killed their beans.  The beans are
oily, and if not French Roast, certainly on the fast track there.  They
definitely did not receive the more tender treatment they deserved.
So this morning, not looking forward to the poor French Roasted Yirgacheffe
I brewed up the Guatemalan, topped off the NISSAN, and headed to work.
So now I sit drinking the virgin roast thinking to myself...this is kind of
bright and acidic and it tastes almost sort of fruity and green which made
me think instead of the initial fear of overoasting, maybe I under roasted.
So, off to the SM webpage I went for Tom's cupping notes, and there it was,
"The lighter roasts have a punctuated fruitiness to them, bright tannic
grape, floral aromatics, and sweet malt syrup roast taste".  Why yes it
does!
I can't say that I like it better then the fresh roasted stuff I'd been
buying.  I live in St. Louis, so I was buying my beans from a roaster that
roasts every Monday and Thursday and always had them within 24hrs.  Still,
I'm please, that it's not undrinkable, and I think part of my dislike, is
that it's just not the bean my palette enjoys most.  
The coffee geek in me is looking forward to the knowledge the home roasting
journey is sure to bring.  I've much to learn.
Bill

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
Make sure you keep some of that Guat' to try out to atleast 5 or 6 day rest.
Me thinks you'll find it a much better cup. Many roasts, especially lighter
air roasts of high density water processed beans (vs dry processed like
Sumatra or Horse), benefit greatly from longer rests IMO.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
<Snip>

3) From: Les
Mike,
I can't believe how much better the Pacamara I am drinking yesterday and
today is after 5-6 days rest.  I thought 3 was good, but my schedule was
nicely interupted by a Christmas bean swap, giving me some even more complex
and awesome brew.
Les
On 12/15/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
Your coffee is sure to get better with experience. Yes, you do have a lot to
learn.  :-)  I have been roasting for over 7 years and still find new and
exciting things to try. If the excitement wears off, you may as well just
drink tea.
--

5) From: Maryann & Dave Schellenberg
Ken Mary wrote:
<Snip>
Not that that's a bad thing!
Lots to learn there too! But not about roasting - tea drinkers are 
satisfied with fermenting.
Hmm! Reminds me of some other beverages.
Dave S.

6) From: bb
I have a buddy that homebrews, so once I iron out a few kinks, we're looking
forward to some collaboration.  Read...coffee stout.


HomeRoast Digest