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Topic: Questions: remotely OnT (7 msgs / 183 lines)
1) From: Bernard Gerrard
This group is really chatty and incredibly tolerant.....unlike some 
specialty groups.  Pardon if the following has been fine-ground previously.
Some classical music lovers here are likely to be familiar with 
J.S.Bach's "Coffee Cantata" (Kaffee-Kantate, BWV 211), composed 
1732-1734 (?).  If not, as coffee lovers, you should be.  I like the 
L'Oiseau-Lyre version with Emma Kirkby.  Unfortunately hard to find 
now.  A synopsis is the dialog between Herr Schlendrian and his strong 
willed daughter Lieschen who MUST have her coffee.  Her aria on the 
subject sums it up:  Mm! How sweet the coffee tastes,  more delicious 
than a thousand kisses, mellower than muscat wine.  Coffee, Coffee must 
I have......etc.
Father tries various threats of grounding and denying her if she will 
not give this stuff up.  The final threat is that there will be no 
husband for her.  She gives in on this one and Herr Schlendrian goes 
forth to find a suitable guy.  Lieschen immediately lets the word out 
that any suitor that comes to her door must know that any wedding 
contract will state that she can have her coffee whenever she wants it.  
She knows her priorities!
The questions:  1.  What sort of coffee was used at this time?  Yemeni?  
Ethiopian?
                        2.  How was it roasted and ground?  No fancy 
contraptions for sure.
                        3.  How brewed?  Turkisher? Boiled?  Milk?  Sugar?
                        4. Cost in today's dollars?
Totally different question:  Has anyone tried growning a coffee plant 
from the green beans we get from SMs?           ------Bernard G.

2) From: Eddie Dove
Bernard,
Fascinating ... I did not know all of that, but do love classical music.
Sorry I can't help you with the questions.
Eddie
On 12/18/06, Bernard Gerrard  wrote:
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3) From: Derek Bradford
On 12/18/06, Bernard Gerrard  wrote:
<Snip>
According to Mark Pendergrast's Uncommon Grounds, Yemen and the Dutch
East Indies (Java) would have dominated at the time.  I don't have
anything more specific, but I'm sure others will.  Alfred's library
probably has lots of information to offer.
<Snip>
I would guess the grinders haven't changed much from the older large
wheel ones we find around today.  I think I've read about older
roasters before, but can't remember where.  Who's got a better answer
here?
<Snip>
Uncertain.  The French didn't much care for the Turkish method of
brewing, and in 1710 began infusing their coffee in cloth bags, and
milk was introduced as a common ingredient (while cafe au lait saw
coffee as an ingredient to milk...).  I'm not sure what was happening
in Germany at that time, and it's possible they were still brewing
Turkish coffee.
<Snip>
Again, I can't really say.  However, in London, in 1700, a cup of
coffee was 1 penny.  Converting that to current values, it's about 1
USD.  (I shilling = 12 pennies; 1 1700 shilling = 6.06GBP ( in 2005
pounds).  Today, one GBP = 0.98 USD)  -- Fromhttp://www.measuringworth.com/calculators/ppoweruk/I'm sure others will have more specific information, and I can't wait
to hear it.
-- http://www.novernae.comHome of the Wandering Sloth

4) From:
Bernard:
Thanks for the wonderful post. I would never have remembered "Coffee Cantata."
WOW great questions but my guess is that they drank mostly a Turkish type of coffee that was pan roasted and most likely very dark, almost spanish roast.
Cost, I will have to go to my encyclopedias for that answer though the frenck kings spent huge amlounts for "kaffee."
ginny
---- Bernard Gerrard  wrote: 
<Snip>

5) From: Peregrine38
I'm not sure this will help, but I just finished "Desolation Island"  
by Patrick O'Brian wherein I encountered the following passage:  "The  
whole ship was embalmed with the roasting of coffee, or rather with  
the parching of the beans in a red-hot skillet."  Nothing on  
grinding, but lots of prose on the joys of coffee.
You may have seen the movie "Master and Commander, Far Side of the  
World" based on the O'Brian novels.  Takes place early 1800's.
Parenthetically, I remember my grandmother roasting peanuts and corn  
the same way.  (Deepest, darkest Mississippi)
Roger
On Dec 18, 2006, at 9:59 AM, Derek Bradford wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Aaron
I tried growing several coffee beans from SM's... didn't work.  I ended 
up getting a dozen plants off E bay for like 4 dollars.   Not that SM's 
sells bad beans but  they are for roasting and am not sure if something 
is done in the process to prepare them to sell to us that might kill the 
germ.
aaron

7) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
Actually I would love to find out more about the history of coffee and
what methods were used when being on the other side of the globe really
has me wondering about all this more and more.
Well in Dances with wolves kevin costners chariter uses a hand grinder
(looks like a zass style to me) to grind with.
So when did grinding start and smashing/crushing end?  
I read (don't remember the source) that the Arabians cherished there
Turkish grinders almost as much as there horses...
Lots of coffee in history. 
Dennis
AKA
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True
CS/CS-5
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69)
FPO AE 09532-2830
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Arabian Gulf
 "On station and on point 136 and counting down..." 
I'm not sure this will help, but I just finished "Desolation Island"  
by Patrick O'Brian wherein I encountered the following passage:  "The  
whole ship was embalmed with the roasting of coffee, or rather with  
the parching of the beans in a red-hot skillet."  Nothing on  
grinding, but lots of prose on the joys of coffee.
You may have seen the movie "Master and Commander, Far Side of the  
World" based on the O'Brian novels.  Takes place early 1800's.
Parenthetically, I remember my grandmother roasting peanuts and corn  
the same way.  (Deepest, darkest Mississippi)
Roger
On Dec 18, 2006, at 9:59 AM, Derek Bradford wrote:
<Snip>


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