HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Espresso- Revelation!!! (7 msgs / 200 lines)
1) From: Jeremy DeFranco
As I mentioned in previous posts, I have an Anita w/PID, and well the first
shot I pulled (about 2 weeks ago) was a bit bitter. So I turned down the
temp, and next shot was real nice and smooth. So, I had kept my machine at
that temp, and have been using it ever since. The PID controller that I
have, like most PID controllers doesn't give the exact readout at the brew
head, but rather from the boiler. So, the temp setting I was using was a bit
higher than the 198-204 you would want to see at the brew head. I figured,
though, that the shots I had been pulling must have fell in the 198-204
range, as they were coming out fairly smooth. However, I just couldn't
resist NOT knowing what the brew temp actually was. So, today, after much
damage to my credit card, my Scace Thermofilter and Fluke thermometer
arrived. Little did I know I was in for a major shock. I hooked up the
device, and set her in place. After weeks of waiting I would finally know
what temp I had been brewing at. I pulled the lever. I watched the readout
on the Fluke go up, and up, and up...... And then level off at 158 degrees
Farenhiet! Wait a second, this can't be right! I looked again at the
display, and I noticed it was in the K thermocouple mode. Must be wrong, I
thought. I double checked the specs, and low and behold, it should be in the
T thermocouple mode. So I switched it into T mode, and gave it another go.
Ahh, there it goes, up, and up, and up, and.... 158!!! Damn, I have been
brewing at 158 all this time?! How can that be so- I thought that lower
temps= less bitter, and higher temps = more bitter..... My mind went into
spasm. I couldn't believe how far off my temp was. Then it all started to
make sense.. So THAT'S why my puck was always sopping wet. That's why I had
to use a much higher setting to get enough pressure for steaming milk... I
set off to discover what my should SHOULD taste like, and what kind of
pressure and heat my Anita SHOULD be cranking out- I cranked up the
controller. Finally, after about 4 or 5 minutes of turning the temp up (in
shock and disbelief at how MUCH I had to turn the temperature setting up
higher) I got to an acceptable 200-204 range. Well, I didn't want to wait
any longer for temp to stabilize- I just had to try this out... So I pulled
a shot. Perfect 28 second 1.5 oz double ristretto in my new labelled shot
glass. I held my breath, and grasped for the shot glass. I was about to see
what the Monkey should really taste like. I kept hoping that reality would
stump my intuition, and this shot wouln't taste bitter. I took the sip....
My taste buds went to work. My mind quickly translated......!!!!WOW!!!! I
have NEVER tasted so many different flavors in brewed coffee in my life! Not
even since homeroasting, and using a Chemex or French Press. My heart was
racing, as my mind grasped the implications of this. All the homeroasted
coffees that I have been enjoying up to now have not yet been fully
appreciated. What I had been thinking was amazing was just the tip of the
iceberg!!! I couldn't even imagine if I didn't get the Scace Thermofilter,
how long it would be to find out I had been on the wrong path. For anyone
who hasn't tried espresso with homeroast, you must. And for anyone who does
make espresso with homeroast, but has not yet confirmed temp, you must. All
I can say is that I am as happy as I was the first day I roasted coffee.
This is truly amazing, and I look forward to future coffees. Tomorrow's a
roast day!!! Cheers! BTW, Thanks Mr. Scace!!

2) From: Leo Zick
This is a multipart message in MIME format.
Let me know when you are ready to ship the scace out on the lending program
:o
From: Jeremy DeFranco [mailto:jeremy.defranco] 
Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2006 7:48 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +Espresso- Revelation!!!
As I mentioned in previous posts, I have an Anita w/PID, and well the first
shot I pulled (about 2 weeks ago) was a bit bitter. So I turned down the
temp, and next shot was real nice and smooth. So, I had kept my machine at
that temp, and have been using it ever since. The PID controller that I
have, like most PID controllers doesn't give the exact readout at the brew
head, but rather from the boiler. So, the temp setting I was using was a bit
higher than the 198-204 you would want to see at the brew head. I figured,
though, that the shots I had been pulling must have fell in the 198-204
range, as they were coming out fairly smooth. However, I just couldn't
resist NOT knowing what the brew temp actually was. So, today, after much
damage to my credit card, my Scace Thermofilter and Fluke thermometer
arrived. Little did I know I was in for a major shock. I hooked up the
device, and set her in place. After weeks of waiting I would finally know
what temp I had been brewing at. I pulled the lever. I watched the readout
on the Fluke go up, and up, and up...... And then level off at 158 degrees
Farenhiet! Wait a second, this can't be right! I looked again at the
display, and I noticed it was in the K thermocouple mode. Must be wrong, I
thought. I double checked the specs, and low and behold, it should be in the
T thermocouple mode. So I switched it into T mode, and gave it another go.
Ahh, there it goes, up, and up, and up, and.... 158!!! Damn, I have been
brewing at 158 all this time?! How can that be so- I thought that lower
temps= less bitter, and higher temps = more bitter..... My mind went into
spasm. I couldn't believe how far off my temp was. Then it all started to
make sense.. So THAT'S why my puck was always sopping wet. That's why I had
to use a much higher setting to get enough pressure for steaming milk... I
set off to discover what my should SHOULD taste like, and what kind of
pressure and heat my Anita SHOULD be cranking out- I cranked up the
controller. Finally, after about 4 or 5 minutes of turning the temp up (in
shock and disbelief at how MUCH I had to turn the temperature setting up
higher) I got to an acceptable 200-204 range. Well, I didn't want to wait
any longer for temp to stabilize- I just had to try this out... So I pulled
a shot. Perfect 28 second 1.5 oz double ristretto in my new labelled shot
glass. I held my breath, and grasped for the shot glass. I was about to see
what the Monkey should really taste like. I kept hoping that reality would
stump my intuition, and this shot wouln't taste bitter. I took the sip....
My taste buds went to work. My mind quickly translated......!!!!WOW!!!! I
have NEVER tasted so many different flavors in brewed coffee in my life! Not
even since homeroasting, and using a Chemex or French Press. My heart was
racing, as my mind grasped the implications of this. All the homeroasted
coffees that I have been enjoying up to now have not yet been fully
appreciated. What I had been thinking was amazing was just the tip of the
iceberg!!! I couldn't even imagine if I didn't get the Scace Thermofilter,
how long it would be to find out I had been on the wrong path. For anyone
who hasn't tried espresso with homeroast, you must. And for anyone who does
make espresso with homeroast, but has not yet confirmed temp, you must. All
I can say is that I am as happy as I was the first day I roasted coffee.
This is truly amazing, and I look forward to future coffees. Tomorrow's a
roast day!!! Cheers! BTW, Thanks Mr. Scace!! 

3) From: Les
Welcome to the Dark Side!  It is hard to beat good pressure extraction!
Les
On 12/20/06, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Michael Dhabolt
Looks like Jeremy has taken the step too far.....revelation.....hooked.
Mike (just plain)

5) From: Jeremy DeFranco
'Tis a slippery slope.... : )
---Looks like Jeremy has taken the step too far.....revelation.....hooked.
Mike (just plain)

6) From: miKe mcKoffee
Seems you've figured out HX espresso machine boiler temp is NOT shot temp.
In fact HX machine boiler water isn't even used in the HX shot but rather
comes from an entirely different water path. There are numerous articles on
home-barista.com explaining HX machine design and HX machine temperature
management methods.
miKe
<Snip>
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jeremy DeFranco
<Snip>
	
<Snip>
the first shot I pulled (about 2 weeks ago) was a bit bitter. So I turned
down the temp, and next shot was real nice and smooth. So, I had kept my
machine at that temp, and have been using it ever since. The PID controller
that I have, like most PID controllers doesn't give the exact readout at the
brew head, but rather from the boiler. So, the temp setting I was using was
a bit higher than the 198-204 you would want to see at the brew head. I
figured, though, that the shots I had been pulling must have fell in the
198-204 range, as they were coming out fairly smooth. However, I just
couldn't resist NOT knowing what the brew temp actually was. So, today,
after much damage to my credit card, my Scace Thermofilter and Fluke
thermometer arrived. Little did I know I was in for a major shock. I hooked
up the device, and set her in place. After weeks of waiting I would finally
know what temp I had been brewing at. I pulled the lever. I watched the
readout on the Fluke go up, and up, and up...... And then level off at 158
degrees Farenhiet! Wait a second, this can't be right! I looked again at the
display, and I noticed it was in the K thermocouple mode. Must be wrong, I
thought. I double checked the specs, and low and behold, it should be in the
T thermocouple mode. So I switched it into T mode, and gave it another go.
Ahh, there it goes, up, and up, and up, and.... 158!!! Damn, I have been
brewing at 158 all this time?! How can that be so- I thought that lower
temps= less bitter, and higher temps = more bitter..... My mind went into
spasm. I couldn't believe how far off my temp was. Then it all started to
make sense.. So THAT'S why my puck was always sopping wet. That's why I had
to use a much higher setting to get enough pressure for steaming milk... I
set off to discover what my should SHOULD taste like, and what kind of
pressure and heat my Anita SHOULD be cranking out- I cranked up the
controller. Finally, after about 4 or 5 minutes of turning the temp up (in
shock and disbelief at how MUCH I had to turn the temperature setting up
higher) I got to an acceptable 200-204 range. Well, I didn't want to wait
any longer for temp to stabilize- I just had to try this out... So I pulled
a shot. Perfect 28 second 1.5 oz double ristretto in my new labelled shot
glass. I held my breath, and grasped for the shot glass. I was about to see
what the Monkey should really taste like. I kept hoping that reality would
stump my intuition, and this shot wouln't taste bitter. I took the sip....
My taste buds went to work. My mind quickly translated......!!!!WOW!!!! I
have NEVER tasted so many different flavors in brewed coffee in my life! Not
even since homeroasting, and using a Chemex or French Press. My heart was
racing, as my mind grasped the implications of this. All the homeroasted
coffees that I have been enjoying up to now have not yet been fully
appreciated. What I had been thinking was amazing was just the tip of the
iceberg!!! I couldn't even imagine if I didn't get the Scace Thermofilter,
how long it would be to find out I had been on the wrong path. For anyone
who hasn't tried espresso with homeroast, you must. And for anyone who does
make espresso with homeroast, but has not yet confirmed temp, you must. All
I can say is that I am as happy as I was the first day I roasted coffee.
This is truly amazing, and I look forward to future coffees. Tomorrow's a
roast day!!! Cheers! BTW, Thanks Mr. Scace!! 
<Snip>

7) From: Greg Scace
Well that pretty much makes my day!   Ho Ho Ho Ho Ho!
-Greg
At 09:42 PM 12/20/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>


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