HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Bean Cooler Complete! (13 msgs / 244 lines)
1) From: Jeremy DeFranco
My bean cooler for the Gene Cafe is all done, and it has been working like a
gem! I can now cool a 300 g batch of beans to cool to the touch in 10-20
seconds- Unheard of when compared to the 12 minutes it has previously taken
me! I originally set out to make a 5 gallon bean cooler, and even bought a 5
gallon bucket. On another trip to Home Depot, however, I saw a real nice 2
gallon bucket that had a smaller footprint, and was more appropriate for the
Gene Cafe's small batch size. I now use the 5 gallon bucket to hold all my
accessories for my soon-to-be-arriving RK drum. Real nice for storing stuff
outdoors. As per Eddie's request, I have attached a link to some photos of
the process. Click here! 
     Cheers,
     Jeremy

2) From: Vicki Smith
That's really nice Jeremy. Thanks for sharing the pics. I might have to 
give it a try.
vicki
Jeremy DeFranco wrote:
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3) From: Michael Dhabolt
Jeremy,
COOL!  pun intended.
As a follow up to your pictures of the construction (my compliments), I
might add: the design is reminiscent of a similar cooler that Jimoncaffeine
constructed a while back.  An addition that he implemented was a cover that
would fit over the whole cooler (cooling basket installed in the bucket)
with another hose hooked to the cover.  He roasts in a Poppery 1 with a tall
chimney.  The extra accoutrement allowed him to install the extra cover and
vacuum the beans from the Poppery into the cooling rig, remove the extra
cover and hose to finish cooling as you are doing.  Works slick.  I think he
calls it the "Beanie Vac 2000" or such ;~)
Mike (just plain)

4) From: Eddie Dove
Nice work!
Eddie
On 12/22/06, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
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5) From: Brian Kamnetz
Jeremy,
I enjoyed your pics. Good comments too. I was wondering about drilling all
the holes. You mention, " I ll have to say that drilling the holes was a
chore. It took me 45 minutes, and two drill bits!"
I'm wondering whether a 12-ga with 8 shot might not do the trick. It would
be hard to calibrate, the thickness of the stainless, the diameter of the
pattern, but once a guy had it dialed in, you could make quick work of the
rest... (assuming, of course, that for some reason a guy would want more
than one....)
Brian "oh, never mind" Kamnetz
On 12/22/06, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
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6) From: Peter Zulkowski
Nice work Jeremy!
Thanks for sharing :)
PeterZ
Jeremy DeFranco wrote:
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7) From: raymanowen
Brian, you are suggesting doing some machine work that is normally done in a
progressive style on a punch press. A 50-Ton punch press at the shop of one
of my metal fabricator friends makes a Hellacious noise when it cycles.
A shop setup would include a jig to perforate the metal sheet in a pattern
of punches and dies. A die is required to back up and absorb the force
applied to the work piece being punched out.
If the shotgun blast were attempted, there is no backup for the work piece.
(You couldn't back it at the center of impact of one of the projectiles.)
There is not enough energy in any shot shell to penetrate even soft material
like aluminum road signs. See Display.
If it were a feasible machine operation, how would you like to work in that
shop? Who would?
One might get a bang out of it.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
"Too often we... enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of
thought. "
 John F. Kennedy

8) From: Steven Dover
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Although I haven't been keeping up with this thread...
I must disagree. Gimme a piece of aluminum = to said road sign and =
I'll show you penetration from a shotshell. However, it will have to be =
~ #1 {.30 inch} buck shot or bigger **depending on distance**. Ftr, =
shotshell velocities range from ~1150 fps to ~1375 fps. Also ftr, "00 =
buck shot" is .33 inch in diameter and a .43 inch diameter {44 cal.} =
"pure lead" ball/pellet weighs about 121 grains. If someone wants to =
figure mass x velocity...    If I wasn't half asleep, I'd go weigh a 00 =
buck pellet.
Then again...the quality/purity/characteristics of the lead =
{chilled/unchilled etc.} will also make a difference in lead hardness =
which will determine penetration {harder = better penetration}.
...end ballistics.
Ftr, I've loaded all my own ammo for several years. 
Steven D.

9) From: Michael Wascher
Perhaps this'd be a good application for steel shot? Not only for
penetration but to eliminate lead residue on the finished product.
On 12/24/06, Steven Dover  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"Of course the game is rigged. Don't let that stop you--if you don't play,
you can't win." --Robert Heinlein

10) From: Brian Kamnetz
Thanks, Ray. Guess that's part of why I am not an engineer....
Brian
On 12/24/06, raymanowen  wrote:
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11) From: Kevin
I used Jeremy's design and built one this weekend.  It works like a champ!
Thanks Jeremy!
Kevin
On 12/22/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
My home coffee roasting blog:http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/Kevin

12) From: Peter Zulkowski
Hi Jeremy,
Thank you so much for posting the pics of your cooler :)
Guess I am sleepy tonight, or just need a shove; but can you tell me how 
you get rid of the chaff from all those beans?
I have been cooling in the roasting machine since I started roasting, 
Poppers and then my bread machine / turbo oven.
With each of these, the chaff handily blew away with the prevailing 
breezes. But maybe that is not cooling fast enough.
Anyway,  I am now on a tear to cool them beans very quickly!
Do you blow the air up through the beans?
Guess I could try that, but I used to loose beans with my Popper doing 
that. I hate it when that happens!
I have lots of different fans and blowers, and a shop vac or two.
I like how you made the cooling chamber :) Lots of patience :)
Perhaps others will volunteer how they remove the chaff from drum setups.
Maybe it is okay to have some mixed in when you grind?
Dunno, I always blast it far away. Not sure if that is still going to 
happen.
Happy New Year to everyone!
PeterZ
Jeremy DeFranco wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Peter,
     For most beans this is not a problem. Some of the chaff will remain
stuck to the bottom of the bowl or go through it, but for the real chaffy
beans, there is a problem, as you mention. This could be solved either by
drilling a few larger holes in the bowl to be vaccumed up during the
cool-down or by simply flipping the beans back and forth one or two times
between the dog bowl and a colander before packaging the beans. So far I
have done neither, though, as I have found that chaff doesn't really affect
the final taste, and is farely harmless IMO. If I do come across a fairly
chaffy roast, though, and I am roasting for someone else, and want the
package to look good, I will simply take a newspaper or magazine, and wave
it back-and-forthe to create a "breeze", blowing down on the beans. The
chaff is so lightweight that this is usually enough to blow most or all of
the chaff out of the bowl.
---Hi Jeremy,
Thank you so much for posting the pics of your cooler :)
Guess I am sleepy tonight, or just need a shove; but can you tell me how
you get rid of the chaff from all those beans?
I have been cooling in the roasting machine since I started roasting,
Poppers and then my bread machine / turbo oven.
With each of these, the chaff handily blew away with the prevailing
breezes. But maybe that is not cooling fast enough.
Anyway,  I am now on a tear to cool them beans very quickly!
Do you blow the air up through the beans?
Guess I could try that, but I used to loose beans with my Popper doing
that. I hate it when that happens!
I have lots of different fans and blowers, and a shop vac or two.
I like how you made the cooling chamber :) Lots of patience :)
Perhaps others will volunteer how they remove the chaff from drum setups.
Maybe it is okay to have some mixed in when you grind?
Dunno, I always blast it far away. Not sure if that is still going to
happen.
Happy New Year to everyone!
PeterZ


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