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Topic: Zass grinder (34 msgs / 733 lines)
1) From: MSMB
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I am looking for a Zassenhaus for my daughter's partner.  He was just in my
house oogling over a grinder I have -not a Zass-and his birthday is coming
up.  I wanted an older one.   The possibilities on ebay are slim (especially
since I do not have much time) so I began to look at other hand grinders.
Does anyone know anything about this French one:  Peugeot Frerres
Valentingney Doubs?  Has anyone been watching the Zass auctions on Ebay and
is there anything that looks particularly interesting (and usable; not just
a decoration).  Anyone have suggestions of where else to look?

2) From: Brett Mason
Try this:
 ebay item  80064150622
 ebay item 130061438141	
 ebay item 290064331908
Good luck,
Brett
On 12/26/06, MSMB  wrote:
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my
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oming
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lly
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-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

3) From: MSMB
Thanks, Brett.  I'll take a look right now.
MS

4) From: Les
I just picked up two nice Zass grinders (not the current listings from Bett)
on Ebay.  I was the only bidder.
Les
On 12/26/06, MSMB  wrote:
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5) From: Peregrine38
Can new burrs be had for the Zass?  Or is this a silly question?  Do  
they last forever on a manual grinder?  There's one claimed to be  
antique on eBay...
Roger

6) From: miKe mcKoffee
I've never seen replacement burrs available anywhere for a Zass'. The idea
that burrs will last a lifetime is ludicrous IMO. NO cutting device stays
sharp forever. Yes Zass' have a 10 year guarantee on the "grinding
mechanism". That in no way gurantees the burrs will remain sharp for 10
years. Purely a function of how many pounds ground and how fine. (Finer
grinding dulls faster simply because burrs grinding the beans more per
pound.)
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
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7) From: Aaron
To be honest, I havent seen replacement burrs for any zass' out there.  
They might be able to be ordered from zass, but currently zass is 
experiencing some... shall we say.... issues, and arent even putting out 
whole grinders let alone just pieces and partses...
SM's been out of quite a number of zass items for some time now with no 
relief in site.
E bay can have some good items, however when something is listed as 
antique, that might just be a polite word for worn out beat up piece 
of... kopi luwak.  gotta be wary on those bargains, but from what I have 
seen of my zass, it is fairly easy to take apart give a real good 
cleaning, and back together again.
On that, yes hand turned grinders can wear out... it should take a good 
long time before it hits that point but it can happen.  A lot of times 
the thing might be performing very sub par only because it needs a 
really good cleaning,  more than just dumping rice down it's gullet but 
an actual take down and cleaning the burrs in water, scrubbing etc etc.
Hope this helps some
Aaron

8) From: raymanowen
If you're real fond of the Zassenhaus burrs, the Solis/ Baratza burrs
look like dead-ringers in the Zass pictures I've seen. Obviously, they
would only be similar, not drop-in replacements.
With some modification, maybe they could be substituted. If I had a
dead Zass "antique," I'd alter Solis burrs to fit the unaltered Zass
if it's "antique" status were paramount. [Maybe we have indeed seen
the last of the new ones-]
Help this hopes-
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
Edsels are automotive antiques, interchangeable with Fomoco drivetrain
parts- are you real picky about your antiques?

9) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I've used a number of different model Zass grinders. I also bought a
Capresso 551 back in '01 to replace my decade old Braun burr grinder. The
Capresso 551 used 2 days before returning it and ordering an "expensive"
Solis Mulino (grinder purchase #2 of 4 in one year leading to a Rocky) using
the old Braun while waiting for delivery. Every Zass I've ever used is
superior to the Capresso 551. 
 
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
www.mcKonaKoffee.com
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Frank Awbrey
Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2007 9:24 PM
 
 Ok, I just ordered the Zass grinder. I also snuck in a couple pounds of the
Indian coffee, although not the real different one.
Now that I ordered it, I kinda wish that they had the other one in stock. I
was looking forward to getting it, but, I'm hoping the grind with this one
will be comparable, in not the same, to it, and better than my Capresso 551
that I've been using the past 3-4 months.
Frank

10) From: Frank Awbrey
I have a question about the consistency of the Zass grinder. I know a coupl=
e of months ago (August?), George Kennedy (I think it was him) had some con=
cerns about the Zass grinder that he had just received, I think. He took a =
little heat over it for bringing it up on this list. Well, sorry to bring t=
his up, but I have some of the same concerns on my new (2 week old) Sweet M=
arias Zass grinder. I never read what his final outcome on the issues was. =
I use my Zass for drip-size grind for my AeroPress. After I grind, I do fin=
d big (boulder?) sized grinds mixed in with the grind.
 
Is this normal for the Zass (reminds me of my old blade grinder grind), new=
 or old? George, were you able to get the consistent grind that you were lo=
oking for? If so, can you tell me exactly what you did?
 
I have not done anything to the Zass except try to adjust the size of the g=
rind using the adjustment knob. I've only tried the adjustment a couple of =
times. I didn't really mess with the adjustments a whole lot, just a couple=
 of times.
 
Thx, for your help, Frank
 
 =

11) From: Sean Cary
I have the same issue with my Zass Turkish, but overall the grind is
much more consistent that a whirly grinder...not as consistent as I
would like however.
Sean
Hating life in Iraq - both my wife and daughter have their birthdays
this week...sigh.
On 10/17/07, Frank Awbrey  wrote:
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12) From: Brian Kamnetz
Frank, I'm wondering if your grinder may be set too coarse. One thing
you might try is to tighten the grind adjustment nut to the point that
the handle will barely turn. Back off just a tisch, so that the burrs
are still touching, and grind some beans. Hopefully, you will be
producing very consistent powder. If that happens, start loosening the
grind very slowly, until you get to the grind you want.
Brian
On 10/17/07, Frank Awbrey  wrote:
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13) From: Richard Ferguson
I have a similar issue with my new Zass.  I am less concerned about the
occasional boulder as I am with fines.  I have always heard of the great
consistency of a Zass but my Meastro beats it hands down.  Either the quality
of the product has fallen with the new stock or the consistency of a Zass was
over hyped.  Don't get me wrong, I still really like the Zass and plan to use
it (travel, camping), but I too was a little disappointed with my results.
richard
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14) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
Is there a "NEW" Zass somewhere near to me? (Hampton Roads VA) I would
love to go head to head with my old one and my newly aquired old style
but brand new from Lisbon.
Dennis
"It is by Caffeine alone that I set my mind in motion
It is by the beans of Java, that my thoguhts aquire speed
the hands acquire shakes; the shakes become a warning
It is by Caffeine alone that I set my mind in motion"

15) From: Brett Mason
On my Zass, coarse means a varied size; fine means extremely consistent -
i.e. for espresso...
So when I grind coarse, I am not surprised at variable sized grounds.
One note though, I rarely get the extreme fines that lead to bittter coffee
- this is why I love my zass...
Brett
On 10/17/07, Frank Awbrey  wrote:
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-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

16) From: Pat Murray
 I have a very new Zass grinder. My experience is the same as Bretts.  With
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17) From: Justin Marquez
That description of results fits my Solis Maestro Plus as well. Although
rarely do I grind to very finest sizes, I frequently set it about halfway
'round between "DRIP" and the finest setting point for use with the
Aeropress.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 10/17/07, Brett Mason  wrote:
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18) From: Frank Awbrey
Thx, Brian and the others for your responses. Like others, I guess I though=
t that the grind would be very even/consistent all of the time. Your answer=
s show that is not necessarily the case and like Richard and Pat, I can liv=
e with that. The Zass is new and the newness has not worn off for me, yet. =
I really like using it in the morning for my AP cuppa. I probably have the =
adjustment knob backed off a couple of turns or close to it. Where I have i=
t set now, seems to make a good press for the AP (i.e., the plunger goes do=
wn with relative ease).
 
Pat, just curious. About how far is your knob backed off for use with your =
AP?
 
Thx, again, Frank=

19) From: Pat Murray
Hi Frank, I adjust my AP grind by tightening the burrs until they are
consistently rubbing, then I back it off until they are only slightly
rubbing.(maybe 1/8 turn)  This produces a fluffy consistent grind.  It is
definitely finer than one would use for drip and it works fine in the AP.
Pat
On 10/17/07, Frank Awbrey  wrote:
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20) From: Brian Kamnetz
Pat,
That sounds like the grind that I use for the moka pot. Pretty much
powder, with maybe a trace of grit.
Brian
On 10/17/07, Pat Murray  wrote:
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21) From: Pat Murray
Brian,
I would call the grind I use a grit.  Powder would be just a little too
fine.  It takes about 160-180 cranks to grind a 44 gram load, which is the
amount I use for a 14 oz mug.
Pat
On 10/17/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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22) From: Brian Kamnetz
Pat,
Forty-four grams of coffee for 14 oz of water is quite a lot stronger
than what I use. To make 12 oz in my moka pot, I use 26 grams of
coffee. The fine grind, nearly powder, works well as long as I keep
the moka pot at a slow seep, in which case the coffee is strong (to
me) but still sweet.
My Zassenhaus is a grain mill, which has the same burrs etc as the box
grinders, according to Tom, but they are fixed in a 7-lb block of
beech, which is clamped to the counter. There is a good sized crank,
maybe 10 inches long, so grinding goes quickly.
Tom has a pretty good photo of a Zassenhaus grain mill on his web site:http://www.sweetmarias.com/zass.grainmill.htmlI don't think Zassenhaus grain mills are available new any more.
Brian
On 10/17/07, Pat Murray  wrote:
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23) From: Pat Murray
Brian,
I agree that 44 g for 14 oz of water sounds like a lot, but that is what I
use for my AP.  In the Technivorm, I use 52 grams for a 1 litre pot and the
strength seems fine.
That's a sweet looking grain mill, to bad they are not available anymore, or
maybe its a good thing - I already have 6 grinders.
This morning when I ground 44 g of Ididio Misty Valley at city+ it only took
110 cranks.  The denser, lighter roasted beans seem to grind more quickly
than the lighter weight more expanded darker roasts. (it takes more effort
to turn the crank also)
Pat
On 10/17/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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24) From: James Raven
Pat & Brian - Bummer on those gringers, Ah, the good ole days!!!!   Oh well
like everything else in life, as time goes on the more automatic and less m=
anual things get, it's like the loss of Wing Windows, oven roasting coffee,=
 popcorn poppers, old boiling type espresso machines (thank gawd for Moka P=
ots) which I still use myself, circa 1962? And my Truck has wing windows as=
 well. Old timers just find it harder to change to power windows, $259 burr=
 grinders, and $500 espresso machines, but I do start my truck with keys an=
d not a crank!!!!
hava good wired day :-)
PS - don't even weigh my grounds, looks good,  that's my measurement!!
From: patmurster
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Zass grinder
Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2007 07:21:47 -0700
Brian,
I agree that 44 g for 14 oz of water sounds like a lot, but that is what I =
use for my AP.  In the Technivorm, I use 52 grams for a 1 litre pot and the=
 strength seems fine.
That's a sweet looking grain mill, to bad they are not available anymore, o=
r maybe its a good thing - I already have 6 grinders.
This morning when I ground 44 g of Ididio Misty Valley at city+ it only too=
k 110 cranks.  The denser, lighter roasted beans seem to grind more quickly=
 than the lighter weight more expanded darker roasts. (it takes more effort=
 to turn the crank also)
Pat
On 10/17/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
Pat,
Forty-four grams of coffee for 14 oz of water is quite a lot stronger
than what I use. To make 12 oz in my moka pot, I use 26 grams of
coffee. The fine grind, nearly powder, works well as long as I keep
the moka pot at a slow seep, in which case the coffee is strong (to
me) but still sweet.
My Zassenhaus is a grain mill, which has the same burrs etc as the box
grinders, according to Tom, but they are fixed in a 7-lb block of
beech, which is clamped to the counter. There is a good sized crank,
maybe 10 inches long, so grinding goes quickly.
Tom has a pretty good photo of a Zassenhaus grain mill on his web site:http://www.sweetmarias.com/zass.grainmill.htmlI don't think Zassenhaus grain mills are available new any more.
Brian

25) From: Brian Kamnetz
Correction: The Zassenhaus grain mill handle is 6.5 inches. I measured
it this morning.
Also, I checked the grind this morning. My grind is more grit than powder.
Brian
On 10/17/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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26) From: Rick Copple
Another thing to check, is to make sure the adjustment nut isn't moving 
as you grind. I believe it would move to a courser setting if left to 
itself, so if that isn't staying in place by laying your finger over it 
while grinding, or putting some lock tight on it, it may be moving to a 
courser setting and getting bigger pieces as you go.
And on the Zass, since the burr isn't anchored at the bottom, it can 
move with the turning of the handle, just a little bit. But enough that 
based on the pressure from the handle and the pressure as the beans 
grind in it, it can move the burr to create more variations in the grind 
the more room it has to move. And the courser you grind, the more room 
the burr has to move and so the more variation.
For instance, if you toss one or two beans in and grind it, it will come 
out courser and more varied because they are pushing on only one side of 
the burr instead of all the way around. But as you go finer, the burr 
has less room to move, and so the grind is more consistent.
However, I have yet to get even in the courser settings as much big 
particles as a whirly blade grinder, and naturally no where near the 
fines since you aren't bashing the beans to pieces.
Of course, all this is assuming the Zass doesn't have something wrong 
with it, damaged burrs, etc., which is of course a whole nother issue.
-- 
Rick Copple

27) From: Sean Cary
I think I found the issue with mine...  I zero'd the blade against the
base - as in I tightened the blade all the way to where they rub.
When I let out some on the adjusting screw, I noticed that there is
some "side play" - the fixture that holds the blade does not stay
centered.  I am guessing that large pieces go down the bigger side
when it shifts over.  I am trying to get used to holding it so I don't
allow it to move...
I am getting a huge variation in grind from dust to chunks..very frustrating.
Sean
In Fallujah - missing my daughters birthday...again.
On 10/19/07, Rick Copple  wrote:
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28) From: Rick Copple
Sean Cary wrote:
<Snip>
I'm guessing you mean burr, since a Zass has no blade. :)
But, make sure the screws holding down the bracket are in solid. Those 
are all that's holding that thing in place. So if those aren't tight, it 
wobbles more. If they are, then excessive wobble could mean something's 
not right. Either you're going too fast and hard (I try to only apply 
enough pressure to move the handle around and grind the beans, no faster 
or harder) or something's damaged. If you are doing this while on a 
counter or table top, try putting it between your legs to act as shock 
absorbers while you crank. That and not pushing it any faster than 
necessary helped when I worked at getting a steady enough grind for a 
finicky vac pot.
-- 
Rick Copplehttp://www.rlcopple.com/

29) From: Sean Cary
Upon closer examination - it would appear that the shaft/burr combo
down the center is not quite centered/aligned.  There is a good deal
of offset to one side.
Agree with the deliberate grinding action, I think that plays a large
part also...grinding harder would aggravate the offset in the
burr/shaft part.
Good enough for coffee in Iraq - I will worry about a fix/repair
whatever, when I get home in Feb.
Sean
On 10/19/07, Rick Copple  wrote:
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30) From: Rich
And you have identified the Quality Control issue with those grinders.  If the burs are off center the 
grind will be all over the place.  If there is a machine shop there and you can talk the machinist into 
making a new bracket to hold proper alignment then it will work.
On Fri, 19 Oct 2007 10:57:29 +0300, Sean Cary wrote:
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31) From: Rich Adams
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Even the highly touted 169DG has this same design, an unsecured =
shaft/burr combination that allows play, I guess it could be QA, but it =
seems like a design.  Looking at a Model 163 and it too has a wobbly =
shaft, not so with the knee mills though.  Designed differently.
Respectfully,
Rich Adams

32) From: Rich
Even with the unsupported burr lower end if the bearing tolerance is reduced to minimum you 
minimize the grind variation.  It is not a robust design either.  look at almost all antique grinders.  
Burr supported both top and bottom.
--Original Message Text---
From: Rich Adams
Date: Fri, 19 Oct 2007 09:27:04 -0500
Even the highly touted 169DG has this same design, an unsecured shaft/burr combination that allows play, I guess it 
could be QA, but it seems like a design.  Looking at a Model 163 and it too has a wobbly shaft, not so with the knee 
mills though.  Designed differently. 
Respectfully, 
Rich Adams

33) From: Frank Awbrey
I did use a pretty fine grind this morning (knob backed off to where the bu=
rr was just barely touching) and it appears to have come out pretty consist=
ent. I am drinking that cup right now (Columbia Choco-El Carmen del Atrato =
roasted to about a city+ in my popper Wednesday evening). The taste is just=
 a little different from a later grind which I had backed off the knob abou=
t 1/4 turn than this one. I think this taste (finer grind) has just a touch=
 of a more acid or pungeant (not really bitter--remember I'm not good tryin=
g to describe my tastes, i.e. the "burnt" that was not really burned) than =
the other. I think I like the less fine grind taste better. Tomorrow, I wil=
l back it off just a touch more and compare that cup/grind with this grind.
 
Just like everyone has said, the boulders disappear with the finer grind. B=
ut I think I do like the coarser grind with my AP (so far). I will eventual=
ly get the grind I'm looking for, I guess. I do not have the knee mill, alt=
hough after what has been said about the bottom burr attachment, kind of wi=
sh I did, although I haven't noticed any burr movement on mine (haven't loo=
ked for it, either).
 
Frank
 
 =

34) From: Brian Kamnetz
Sounds like progress, Frank.
Brian
On 10/19/07, Frank Awbrey  wrote:
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