HomeRoast Digest


Topic: iroast2 thermocouple (4 msgs / 104 lines)
1) From: Mike Garfias
I'm looking for suggestions on how to mod the iRoast2 with the  
addition of a thermocouple.  The goal is to be more consistent with  
the roasting than my normal (for now) eye ball method: "Yup, looks  
done".
Mostly I want to know if I drill a small hole in the side and somehow  
thread the thermocouple in from there, or go in from the top.
Any ideas?

2) From: Vicki Smith
 From the top. Check out the tip sheet on SM for information about that.
I was able to carefully thread a SM thermocouple into the roasting 
chamber w/o cutting any holes. It wasn't anything that had long term 
appeal, mostly because I use the IR2 inside, and the dryer vent thingee 
didn't seat properly with it in place.
However, in between eyeballing and using a power tool on the contraption 
lies a middle ground involving listening for the cracks, noting the 
smoke/smells, and keeping good records of your roasts. It works for me, 
but I am not entirely a data driven sorta gal.
v
Mike Garfias wrote:
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3) From: bb
I'm still a newb for sure, but this is very true.  You can see, if you chart
your roasts minute by minute, very quickly where the cracks tend to happen
on a given bean.
It's really helped me see in only a few roasts how something like the Guat
Blue will roast in comparison to a larger bean like Sumatra.  The same
weight of Sumatra ramps up in temp much faster for me, and has led me to
decrease the size of the roast.  I'll assume this is do to the size/weight
of the bean and it's not being able to cycle through the i-roast as well.
Anyway, having fun for sure, I've bought a few five pound batches so that I
can really roast the same thing over and over again to get a feel for the
machine, and roasting in general, with the ability to take the variable of
differing coffees out.

4) From: David Schooley
I ran my thermocouple wire in through the bottom. You will need to
take apart the roasting chamber by removing the screws at the bottom
of the chamber. The wire first goes down on the outside between the
glass and the plastic and then back up on the inside of the chamber.
The wire then bends in toward the center and down a bit to always be
in the bean mass. If you do it right, the wire does not contact the
metal reflection plate. (I think there is an o-ring.) This is a
semi-permanent mod, in that it is easy to undo (no drilling), but you
do not need to mess with the wire every day. The wire does not move
around, so your temperature measurements remain consistent from one
roast to the next.
On 12/29/06, Mike Garfias  wrote:
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