HomeRoast Digest


Topic: The supertaster thing again (13 msgs / 337 lines)
1) From: Scot Murphy
Something struck me the other day about the expectations of  
supertasters. Supposedly they won't like coffee because it's too  
bitter, which is why I thought that test was off. Then I thought: I  
really don't like coffee *black.* "Bitter" isn't the word I use so  
much as "brackish": there's something harsh about it until I add half- =
and-half. Then, of course, it is the nectar of the gods. But I have  
tried, really really tried, to like coffee black, especially to cut a  =
little fat out of my diet, and I just can't do it. I have to have it  
diluted.
So what do you think? Am I in supertaster range?
Scot "I'm getting coriander...mango...pepper...asparagus...and is  
that a soupçon of frog's legs?" Murphy
---
"You were sick, but now you're well again, and there's work to do."
                           --Kilgore Trout

2) From: Eddie Dove
Scot,
My wife (not a supertaster) cannot drink coffee black, but she loves it
(homeroast only) with cream and sweetener.  I (supertaster), on the other
hand, cannot enjoy my coffee any other way than black; I have tried.  My
wife cannot taste any flavors in the coffee when it is black (she uses the
term bitter), but when she adds her cream and sweetener, she can taste the
most prominent flavors to a certain extent (cherry, blueberry and chocolate
the other day).  I imagine, supertaster or not, personal preference /
palatability comes into play ... in a big way.
That test had to be using mass produced / marketed coffee.  I cannot imagin=
e
it gleaning the same result using quality coffee brewed within
specifications.
One incontrovertible truth about life is that no one make it out alive!
Drink it how ya like it!
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 12/30/06, Scot Murphy  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
Scot,
Who supposes that supertasters find coffee bitter, or brackish?  I've heard
from a few who are supper-cuppers.
How are you brewing your coffee?
Do you do espresso?
Are you absolutely confident that you are drinking optimally prepared coffe=
e
of whatever sort?
According to my mother-in-law, if one's life is shortened by poor dietary
habits (like, oh, say, drinking half-and-half,) those years come off the en=
d
of one's life when you'd likely to be miserable in a nursing home.  So don'=
t
worry.
- - - -and if that convinces you, you have more problems than bitter
coffee.  :o)
Martin
On 12/30/06, Scot Murphy  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Martin
Heat + Beans
    all the rest is commentary

4) From: Scot Murphy
On Dec 30, 2006, at 7:53 PM, Heat + Beans --all the rest is  
commentary wrote:
<Snip>
Sure I am. I use a glass vac-pot big enough for one mug at a time, so  
every time I drink a cup it's fresh. The thing about supertasters  
finding coffee bitter came from the test posted here a week or two  
ago. I *would* do espresso if my machine didn't need a new group gasket.
<Snip>
I like that. I think I'll use that as an excuse.
<Snip>
Uh oh. :)
Scot "taking up the slack with barbecue" Murphy
---
"You were sick, but now you're well again, and there's work to do."
                           --Kilgore Trout

5) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-25-247651474
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
I have grown to detest the taste of anything sweet in my coffee--it  
tastes cloying to me (and I used to adore mochas and eggnog lattes).   
I can barely handle iced mochas--and they had better not be on the  
sweet side.  I like breves and cappas, but not lattes or just plain  
milk or cream in my coffee. My favorite way to drink coffee is black.
On Dec 30, 2006, at 7:13 PM, Eddie Dove wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-25-247651474
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
I have grown to detest the taste =
of anything sweet in my coffee--it tastes cloying to me (and I used to =
adore mochas and eggnog lattes).  I can barely handle iced mochas--and =
they had better not be on the sweet side.  I like breves and cappas, =
but not lattes or just plain milk or cream in my coffee. My favorite way =
to drink coffee is black.
On Dec 30, 2006, at 7:13 PM, =
Eddie Dove wrote:
 I (supertaster), on the other = hand, cannot enjoy my coffee any other way than black; I have = tried. Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-25-247651474--

6) From: Scott Marquardt
I'm with you on sweeteners, Sandy, but I'll be dinged if dairy doesn't do
some intriguing things to coffee. What's astonishing to me is how often I'll
have a cup o' something black, then add dairy to a second cup and get an
eyebrow-raising epiphany out of it. Something about the dairy just brings
some stuff out I'm too dull to appreciate without it.
Sez the guy sippin' a black cup just now.  :-)
On 12/30/06, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Ed Needham
I can't help but chuckle a little bit over this supertaster/not a 
supertaster thing.  That little test on the internet is not really much of a 
definitive measure of whether you can taste more accurately or more 
sensitively than others.  Taste is much more than how many taste buds we 
have per centimeter.  Taste and smell together, as well as how we've trained 
our senses determines whether we are discriminating tasters.  Don't let 
anyone fool you.  Next we'll all have to compare how big our stash is or how 
many coffeemakers we have.  Time to grow up.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

8) From: Larry English
Ed said: "Taste and smell together, as well as how we've trained our senses
determines whether we are discriminating tasters."
  After 67 well-lived years, my well-trained ability to smell and taste fine
wine and great coffee is on a downslope.  The test told me I'm a
supertaster, but my senses and my memory tell me otherwise.
Ed says: "Next we'll all have to compare how big our stash is or how many
coffeemakers we have."
  I have 57.2 lb. in my current stash and can brew coffee in 7 different
ways.
Ed says: "Time to grow up."
  At 67, I've grown up all I can grow up, so now I just enjoy, to the best
of my current ability.
Happy New Year, y'all ...
Larry
-- 
"You can't know the unknowable, but you can do the doable." - Jon Carroll

9) From: Eddie Dove
ummmmm ... bitter.
On 12/30/06, Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/

10) From: Barbara Wilson
The supertaster thing is a little funny, especially the part about 
supertasters not liking the bitter taste. The supertasters that I know, 
me included, like a little bitter taste. Also, they (the experts) say 
that some people are supertasters and some are not,  a genetic 
difference, but then say that more children are supertasters than adults.
I have had the experience of developing  a stronger sense of taste and 
believe that comes from the serious practice of yoga. All of my senses 
are stronger now and I don't think there is anything mystic about it, it 
is simply increasing awareness of all things through paying more 
attention. It seems like as we taste coffee more carefully our ability 
to taste more should improve. 
As far as cream use..my opinion, fwiw, is that cream increases the 
ability to taste some things in coffee and covers up or dilutes others. 
Supposedly, fat will stick to and carry the flavors and hold on to them 
longer and they will sit on the tongue longer if attached to fat molecules.
The good part about the supertaster thing for me is that my husband used 
to complain about how picky I am about tastes in food that he cannot 
taste,  like stale things or the taste of plastic dishes, etc. And since 
he heard on NPR that there is such a thing as supertasters about a year 
or so ago, he no longer complains about my crazy imagination.
 Eddie Dove wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Ed Needham
I think that makes a lot of sense.  Tasting is as much a learned phenomenon 
as a physical one.  Most of the taste sensations come from a collaboration 
in the brain between the smell areas and the more limited taste area.  The 
tongue and inside lining of the mouth can only sense the most basic tastes 
of bitter, sour, salty and sweet .  These, paired with the smell sensors 
give a much more specific taste perception.  The brain is what ultimately 
processes the sensory input, and the end perception includes stored 
experience and whatever mental processes you've developed by practice and 
learning to be more sensitive and in tune to the tastes and smells.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

12) From: Lilboybrew
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
On 12/31 Ed Needham had the insight to write:
I think that makes a lot of sense.  Tasting is as much a learned phenomenon
as a physical one.
I agree 100%. There were beers that tasted horrible to me until I learned
enough about the brewing process to know what those new (to me) flavors were
all about. The more I learned about the brewing process, the more flavors I
learned to like. As my education continued, I found that I could taste more
and more things that I had previously not noticed.
Larry J (Lilboybrew)
To be good is noble, but to teach others how to be good is nobler--and less
trouble.
-  Mark Twain

13) From: George Birchard
Milk has a chemical reaction with some of the bitter components. That's 
why *$ coffee tastes so bad w/o milk. The burned coffee shows its notes 
after the milk reacts with the bitter components.
Barbara Wilson wrote:
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest