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Topic: Chemex Experimentation WAS: +Introduction and Question on the Amount of Beans (9 msgs / 221 lines)
1) From: Nate
Thanks for the input, Andy.  Over the last two days I've tried a couple of
different methods with the Chemex.  For all of which I used exactly 2 Tbsp
of grounds for exactly 5 cups of water.
My major changes were pre-soaking the filter and changing the grind size. I
found that when I pre-soaked the filter, the coffee seemed to start
streaming into the pot right away, as opposed to dripping first and then
streaming.  I suppose that's because the filter was absorbing less water.
Regardless of the grind size, I found that the coffee tasted "cleaner" when
I did this.  I'm not exactly sure how to describe it, but I liked it better
with the pre-soaked filter.
As for the grind size, I still haven't figured out what I like all the
time.  I have started to settle on a grind level that is right in between
the "drip" and "expresso" icon on my Solis Maestro Classic. That seems to be
just right for me so far.
What I also found out is that I Iove this Chemex pot.  It makes incredible
coffee!
Nate
On 12/29/06, Andy Thomas  wrote:
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2) From: Ed Needham
You must be using brown filters.  Yuck
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

3) From: Nate
Actually, I'm using the bleached ones, but I've always wondered: why do they
sell unbleached filters?
On 12/31/06, Ed Needham  wrote:
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4) From: Eddie Dove
Nate,
You wrote, "What I also found out is that I Iove this Chemex pot.  It makes
incredible coffee!"
I beg to differ.  It is just a vessel, an inanimate object, a tool in the
hand of a master.  You sir, make incredible coffee!  ;-)
Happy New Year!
Respectfully,
Eddie
On 12/31/06, Nate  wrote:
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-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/

5) From: Nate
I stand corrected.  I might actually be making excellent coffee. ;-)
Happy New Year, Everyone!
Nate
On 12/31/06, Eddie Dove  wrote:
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6) From: Ed Needham
I've never had any negative tastes or smells using the white filters, and 
have not seen the benefit of pre-rinsing them.  I think the unbleached 
filters cater to those who think they are more environmentally and 
chemically safe.  *********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

7) From: Kevin
Nate/Ed,
I believe, coffee filters and other white paper products were/are
bleached with dioxins, "Dioxins are also generated in reactions that
do not involve burning — such as bleaching fibers for paper or
textiles, and in the manufacture of chlorinated phenols, particularly
when reaction temperature is not well controlled
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dioxin#Sources_of_dioxin). Dioxins are
known to have adverse health effects as well (refhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dioxin#Toxicity). Because of this
toxicity there was a general demand for bleached paper products using
a more environmentally and less toxic alternative to dioxin. Companies
such as Filtropa and Melitta http://www.melitta.com/facts.asp)have
turned to unbleached paper products and Oxygenated bleaching
processes, presumably ozone, O3, which, when properly handed (with a
catalyst), degrades into O2 and is dioxin free.
On a side  note:  One drawback to O3 is the large amount of
electricity required to generate sufficient quantities for bleaching
paper on an industrial scale.  A few years back a colleague of  mine
and I designed a machine that used a spiral conveyor (commonly used
for commercial food freezing applications) and ozone to kill
bacteria/viruses on the surface of produce.  This was in the 90's when
there was an e-coli outbreak in CA public schools that was incorrecly
blamed on CA strawberries. The real culprits were rasperries imported
from South America.  The false blame on CA strawberries had negative
economic consequences on CA strawberry growers.
Kevin
On 12/31/06, Ed Needham  wrote:
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e
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ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>
-- 
My home coffee roasting blog:http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/Kevin

8) From: SamToren
I tried the unbleached filters for the Chemex, and the coffee tastes like a brown paper bag. You have to wash the unbleached filters for about a minute, and the coffee still has a lingering taste of brown paper bags. I changed to the bleached filters, and there is no taste whatsoever.  What a waste of 200 unused unbleached filters ($14), and a couple days of home roasted african coffee.  Maybe I can get my money back???
   
  They should put a big warning on the unbleached filters - produces a hot black liquid which tastes like wet brown paper bags.
  
    Forwarded Message 
          From:  "Ed Needham"     To:  homeroast    Subject:  Re: Chemex Experimentation WAS: +Introduction and Question on the Amount of Beans    Date:  Sun, 31 Dec 2006 14:38:19 -0500
    Plain Text Attachment [ Scan and Save to Computer | Save to Yahoo! Briefcase ] 
I've never had any negative tastes or smells using the white filters,   and have not seen the benefit of pre-rinsing them.  I think the unbleached   filters cater to those who think they are more environmentally and   chemically safe.  *********************  

9) From: Ed Needham
I'm not aware of any coffee filters that still use the old bleaching methods 
with occasional trace amounts of dioxin left in the paper and the 
environment.  Chemex, as well as all other food-safe filters now use an 
oxygenated bleaching method that is not only environmentally friendly but 
takes away the nasty cardboard taste of the brown filters.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************


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