HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Gene Cafe Profile and Preliminary Results *300g Batch* Update (14 msgs / 293 lines)
1) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Eddie et. al,
     Well I've been sipping on the products of my latest 300g batch results,
and so far I am blown away by the smoothness imparted by the Hairbender
style profile!!! This day two post- roast has, by far, been the most
significant day thus far as far as cup quality is concerned, although day 1
post-roast was amazing as well (very chocolatey, oily, and smooth Cachoeira
Yellow Bourbon). This is amazing! The Brazil Cochoeira Bourbon was by far
the smoothest, least bitter, sweetest, and most enjoyable espresso shot I
have ever had to date! In fact, I went to pull an espresso shot of it before
making an Americano, and after drinking the espresso, I didn't even want an
Americano- I wanted another double ristretto! The other coffee I roasted
with Hairbender style roast, with a slightly different profile, was Java
Djampit. I made a couple of Americanos with this. Now this coffee has always
had the characteristic of smoothness, but with the Hairbender style roast,
the magnitude of smoothness was simply unbeleivable! Again, not even a hint
of bitter, just all smooth and silky; I am blown away! I have roasted this
coffee about 4 or 5 times now, and this hairbender style roast simply does
the most justice to this bean. Truly unbeleivable. I recommend that all of
you experimenting with GC profiles try this Hairbender style roast,
origionally recommended by Mike McKoffee. My next plan is to modify this
profile to fit a smaller 250 g or 235 g batch, but I do not expect any major
adjustments from the 300g profile. Again, after 1st crack comes to an end, I
drop the temp. to 420 degrees for 4:15. I then finish the roast at 431
degrees. This gives a nice ~ 5 minutes in-between 1st and 2nd. Slightly
lower temps may be required for smaller batches, but I have not yet tried
this out. I probably won't test this out till the weekend, but if you try it
before then, please let me know how it goes. One thing about the dry aroma
of the Hairbender style is that it is markedly diminished, however, don't
let this fool you, there will be complexity and smoothness in the cup! Great
for enhancing natural low acidity or chocolaty characteristics of proper
beans. I have posted the the profiles for the 300g roasts below. I have not
yet settled on these, but I will be using them as guidlines for future
profile adjustments. If you try these out, let me know how it goes:
Java Hairbender Style:
316 degrees for 5 minutes
440 degrees for 5:30
469 degrees till end of 1st
420 degrees for 4:15
431 degrees to finish
     -1st crack: 16:22
     -2nd crack: 23:22
     -Taken to first few snaps of 2nd, just before rapid acceleration
     -Cooled w/shop vac/dog bowl
Cachoeira Hairbender Style:
300 degrees for 5:15
440 degrees for 5:15
465 degrees till end of 1st
420 degrees for 4:15
431 degrees to finish
     -1st crack: 16:30
     -2nd crack:  23:22
     -Taken to 2nd, stopped just as 2nd became accelerated
     -Cooled w/shop vac/dog bowl
Post-Hairbender-Style Roast Reflections:
     -(Cachoeira) Phase 1 seems to be key. The extreme smoothness of the
Cachoeira may very well be due in part to 15 second longer phase 1, although
I am quite confident that
      extended time between 1st and 2nd played the major role.
     -(Java) Phase 1 again was key for this 300g batch size. The higher temp
phase 1 (416 degrees) may in fact have similar effect as the 15 second
longer phase 1 used for
      Cachoeira.
     -I've come to conclusion (at this point in time) that Phase 1 really is
key for 300g batch size, and is probably more important for GC than phase 2,
even. Phase one seems to
      be the one and only temp setting on the GC, that the GC seems to climb
to set temp quickly AND stay there (300g batch)! For this reason, I beleive
it is the best phase to
      manipulate, and take advantage of when profiling with bean mass 300g.
Temp settings of 316 degrees and 320 degrees (at setting of 316 degrees,
on-board temp actually stayed
      around 320 degrees) for phase 1 AND/OR extended phase 1 seem to ensure
a very even warm up of bean without over-zealously carmelizing the outside
before the evaporation
      front reaches center of bean. It may be in order to try a combination
of these two settings next 300 g roast, while still ending phase 2 at
elapsed time 10:30. I may possibly try a
      320 degree setting for 5:15, and a 440 phase two for 5:15, although it
will be interesting to see if this is too much HeatxTime for a medium hard
density bean to handle.
I have much more info to come. I have been doing lots of digging in the
sparse amount of roasting literature available, and I fully plan to
implement and divulge all I have learned to the list. Might be a bit to get
thoughts and profiles organized, but they will come... Cheers!

2) From: Eddie Dove
Thanks Jeremy ... I will have to try it!  Please keep us posted!
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 1/3/07, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Thank you, Eddie, for inspiring us GC users to think beyond the one temp
profile!
---Thanks Jeremy ... I will have to try it!  Please keep us posted!
Eddie

4) From: Jeremy DeFranco
I should also mention that I am really having a blast experimenting with all
these profiles, whether they work or not. Adds a whole new dimension to the
joy and satisfaction of roasting!

5) From: Eddie Dove
I have the Djampit and will have to give it a shot; it was fantastic the
last time and if it can be even better, then I'm all for it!  I am wondering
what this might do to the Iskandar and the WP Toarco ...
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 1/3/07, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Eddie Dove
Agreed.  You need to send us all of your other notes and information too!
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 1/3/07, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Will be interesting to see how the body of the Iskander reacts to this
profile. I would use a higher stage 3 setting, though for the Toarco,
because it is a denser bean (see following
article(note, website also has 3
other great roasting articles well worth a read).
Thisis
also a great article from same author that discusses the profiling of
a
dense bean. I would then begin to drop temps possibly 10 seconds before 1st,
during 1st, or at beginning of 1st to keep roast from getting to exothermic,
and out of control. Possibly do the drop down to 420 at beginning to middle
of first, with a stage 3 of 475 or above... Maybe not full 482, as it is not
a super dense bean (grown above 5,000 feet), according to Tom's write-up,
although the GC, even at 482 does not have as much kick as a professional
large batch roaster at same temp., and will be less likely to scorch or tip
the bean. Could also, instead, try a drop to 431 at beginning of 1st crack,
and then drop to 420 at end of 1st. Let us know how it goes! Cheers.
--I have the Djampit and will have to give it a shot; it was fantastic the
last time and if it can be even better, then I'm all for it!  I am wondering
what this might do to the Iskandar and the WP Toarco ...
Eddie

8) From: Lilboybrew
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
It figures; as soon as I get the iRoast I had been lusting over, this GC
thingy comes out and I feel all inadequate again.   >heavy sigh<
Larry J (Lilboybrew) .. consistently unable to keep up with the Jones'.
To be good is noble, but to teach others how to be good is nobler--and less
trouble.
-  Mark Twain  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jeremy DeFranco
Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2007 9:57 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +Gene Cafe Profile and Preliminary Results *300g Batch* Update
I should also mention that I am really having a blast experimenting with all
these profiles, whether they work or not. Adds a whole new dimension to the
joy and satisfaction of roasting!

9) From: Jeremy DeFranco
You shouldn't be discouraged, the iRoast is great for experimenting with
profiles. Hot air also dramatically increases the heat conduction rate to
the beans, and it has been argued that hot air roasters are superior to drum
roasters when used properly. They also have much better ability for
determining surface bean temp. than GC. I highly recommend the installation
of a thermocouple in the bean mass of the iRoast, and determining the power
of your machine (some iRoasts run "hotter" than others, and in these cases
you must decrease heat slightly to avoid scorching). Then you will be well
on your way to creating some real nice profiles.
---It figures; as soon as I get the iRoast I had been lusting over, this GC
thingy comes out and I feel all inadequate again.   >heavy sigh<
Larry J (Lilboybrew) .. consistently unable to keep up with the Jones'.
To be good is noble, but to teach others how to be good is nobler--and less
trouble.
-  Mark Twain

10) From: Michael Dhabolt
Jeremy,
Appreciate the links.  Both are definately worth while reads.
Mike (just plain)

11) From: Kevin
Jeremy,
thanks for the info!  I'll have to reread this article before I roast
again.  As soon as I think I have roasting all figured out I read an
article that puts me back to square 1!  **heavy sigh**  Now think I
understand McKoffee's signature..."To know is to realize I don't
know."  The thing that keeps me going is that the coffee I roast is
hands down better than any pre-roast I have ever had.  Coffee is a
journey...sit back and enjoy the ride!
Enjoying the Mexican Chiapas Special Lot from a French Press this
morning...Just poured the last cup **double heavy sigh**
-- 
My home coffee roasting blog:http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/Kevin

12) From: Ronnie Kramer
Well, I just ordered the IR2.  I considered the GC and other things, but I can't justify the price, never having roasted beans before and all.  Maybe one day.
   
  Ronnie
Lilboybrew  wrote:
        v\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}  o\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}  w\:* {behavior:url(#default#VML);}  .shape {behavior:url(#default#VML);}        st1\:*{behavior:url(#default#ieooui) }                It figures; as soon as I get the iRoast I had been lusting over, this GC thingy comes out and I feel all inadequate again.   >heavy sigh<
   
  Larry J (Lilboybrew) …. consistently unable to keep up with the Jones’.
   
    To be good is noble, but to teach others how to be good is nobler--and less trouble.
                                                                                                              -  Mark Twain
---------------------------------
  
  From: homeroast-admin [mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jeremy DeFranco
Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2007 9:57 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +Gene Cafe Profile and Preliminary Results *300g Batch* Update
  I should also mention that I am really having a blast experimenting with all these profiles, whether they work or not. Adds a whole new dimension to the joy and satisfaction of roasting!
Ronnie Kramer
Austin, TX

13) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
I would not say superior, but different. I spent 5 years with various
poppers and profiles from 2 minutes to 25 minutes. One year of that
overlapped my start into drum roasting with a homebuilt. The popper roasts
were good with short profiles, but longer profiles resulted in baked or less
desirable flavors. Once I learned to use the drum, I never looked back at
the poppers. I have a t/c probe in the beans and there is no airflow to
affect the readings. The main advantage that the drum has over the popper is
that the bean mixing does not depend on airflow.
While you cannot measure bean temp in a GC, you should be able to reliably
use the set temps or a separate t/c in the hot air inlet to set up profiles.
--

14) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Kevin,
     Funny thing is I read all these articles previously as well, and they
never made so much sense until now. Wander what else I might be missing that
I'll pick up again a year or two later. One success today, a lifetime of
failures to come.
---I'll have to reread this article before I roast again.  As soon as I
think I have roasting all figured out I read an article that puts me back to
square 1!  **heavy sigh**  Now think I understand McKoffee's signature..."To
know is to realize I don't know."


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