HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT: Peanuts (2 msgs / 81 lines)
1) From: Kevin
This is off topic, but does anyone on the list roast peanuts?  If so,
do you know a good online source for fresh peanuts?
-- 
My home coffee roasting blog:http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/Kevin

2) From: TERRY TITSWORTH
Actually, I just started roasting peanuts in my Rosto. I had replaced it
about a year ago with an I-R-2 because it had stopped getting hot enough to
get the beans to 1st crack.
As far as source for peanuts, the ones I am roasting presently are about a
year old (been in my freezer) given to me by a member of our Church. As far
as a commercial outlet or web site, I have none...
Strange thing about the Rosto Roaster, I stumbled across the peanuts while
searching the freezer, and decided to try roasting them in the Rosto since
it still go hot and I wasn't using it for anything else. So I poured a
fistful of goobers in the machine (shelled, spanish type) and flipped on the
Rosto. I let it run for about 13 minutes (timer won't time anymore) and as
they approached what I thought might be well roasted, I poured them into a
seive and cooled them. Well, I think they are past Vienne and closer to
Spanish roast than anything, pretty dark actually.
The next batch I timed at about 5 minutes and remembered the cool down cycle
of the Rosto, turning the dail to cool them. Still a tad bit dark. My next
roast was about 4 1/2 min.'s and they were just a little under what I was
looking for, just a little on the sweet side.
If my stash holds out I will zero in on my 'sweet spot' since I think I have
the spot bracketed.
Now my real reason for responding is that the whole process caused a
"miracle" in my Rosto machine...After the second or third roast I thought
that the machine was getting pretty hot, so I stuck a lead from my
temp/voltage/resistance measuring device (multimeter) up by the exhaust port
and the exhaust temps were around 350/360 f. So I located Tom's suggested
weight for roasting coffee (136 grams) and poured in a weighed amount of
Ethiopian decaf (never had a scale while originally roasting with this
device) and set a timer for 10 minutes. Since there is virtually no chaff
with the decaf I was afraid it wouldn't roast was fast, but again since
there is virtually no chaff with it, there is no deflection of the heated
return air the Rosto was drawing a good supply of preheated air back into
the roast chamber. My readout showed a top temp of 425 degrees but I think
the lead was touching the chamber walls. The roast was pretty good but I am
still adjusting to the decaf nuances.
I did a second roast last night with a Costa Rica Heicenda and the temp
probe lead was curled in such a fashion that it didn't touch the roast
chamber walls. Temperatures reached a max of 420 degrees F. I am letting
this batch rest for a couple of days.
I have no clue why the Rosto now reaches temps about 80 degrees higher than
the day I 'retired' it. My last roast with it in 2005 got my beans to a
little past a tan shade. The house current still registers 119 to 123 volt
on any given day.
So now I am going to stop transporting my roasters and leave the I-R-2 at
home for use on the week-ends and the Rosto at my trailer for 'emergency'
roasting (when I can't get 3 batches roasted at home on the week-ends)
ooooorrrrr more goobers....
The length of this 'note' is due to my being at work, waiting on others to
catch up so I can get Back to work...I have completed some AUTOCAD work that
is due on the 15th of this month, and the remainder of the files won't get
touched until the 12th...
In the mean time...Back to my Zimbabwe....
On 1/4/07, Kevin  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Start HOT and work your way Down...
Peppers AND Coffee.
[|:{O....[|:{U...
(I'm the tall guy in the middle)


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