HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Colombia Cauca Organic - La Esperanza (13 msgs / 321 lines)
1) From: DeCambre.Peter
I will be out of the office starting  11/26/2002 and will not return
until 12/02/2002.
I will respond to your message when I return.
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: Blake R.
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Has anyone tried Colombia Cauca Organic - La Esperanza?  If I tend to =
like Columbians will I like this one?
Thanks ... Blake

3) From: Jeff Oien
Blake R. wrote:
<Snip>
I'm sure Brett will chime in but I had this at a friend's house
and think you will like it if you like Colombians. There isn't
anything unusual about it. Some have winey fruit or raisiny
(although Tom does mention the latter in the review [aroma])
character that I don't like. This is a really nice cup with
BIG body, nice sweetness, simple but interesting.
JeffO

4) From: Eddie Dove
Blake,
YES!  I am drinking some right now that I brewed in the KMB.  Personally, I
really like it ... better than the Excelso 13556.  I just updated my blog
today with my roasting and brewing notes if you wish to review them.
Hope this helps ...
Respectfully,
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 1/6/07, Blake R.  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Brett Mason
The Columbians are mostly near Vancouver, British Columbia, except for
a few that live in Wahington, District of Columbia.
If these people are like me, then any coffee from Colombia will be
pleasing to them too.  I like them for being a moderate, middle of the
road kind of coffee.  Sometimes they exhibit some great chocolate
tones too.  I haven't had the La Esperanza yet, but I do have 20lb on
its way to me as we speak.  I should know my take on your question by
Wednesday...
Regards,
Brett
  Columbians for Colombian Coffees - member....
On 1/6/07, Jeff Oien  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

6) From: Eddie Dove
"I like them for being a moderate, middle of the road kind of coffee."
Brett likes the Columbian coffees because they are extreme centrist coffees
...  :-)
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 1/6/07, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Brett Mason
They have smooth chocolate centers.  But I don't like the currant ones...
On 1/6/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

8) From: Eddie Dove
By the way, my son, Wyatt (almost 4), just informed me that the aroma is
"coffee nut".  I wasn't sure if he was commenting on the coffee or me, so I
did confirm that he was talking about the smell of the coffee ...
I am having this coffee again this morning ... deep, dark syrupy, virtually
no brightness, a bit of drying walnut.  This is by far, my favorite
Columbian coffee so far.
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 1/6/07, Blake R.  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Blake R.
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Ok I'm getting it!  Along with more "Blue Quetzal" and "Misty Valley".  =
Now I empathize with those with a bloated coffee stash.  :o)  I =
appreciate the feedback.
Thanks ... Blake

10) From: Paul Jolly
I roasted three pounds in the RK drum on Thursday evening.  Stopped 'just a few snaps' into second crack.  Once cool, I took it inside and saw that I had a true City roast---NOT my style, and I feared that it might have been skunky.  To be safe (and to aim for a roast that's more to my liking) I dropped two more pounds into the roaster and, using a strong flashlight, didn't stop until I saw some glints of oil on the beans.  Ahh....FC+ or Vienna, what I love to brew in the Silvia.
   
  Unable to wait for a proper rest, I ground up some of the City batch to smell for skunk.  No skunk!  I then blended the light & darker roasts together (after pulling out a half-pound of the light roast, just to check it in the coming days with increasing rest times).  I've been drinking straight espresso & Gibraltars made from the melange blend this weekend, and it's really really good.  Muted brightness, big body; as a friend of mine said, "Wow--that's robust!"  Good stuff, that.
   
  Paul
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11) From: Jeff Oien
Paul Jolly wrote:
<Snip>
If it went that far it would have to be a FC+.
JeffO

12) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
Good advice ... it reminded me that I was looking over roasted coffee 
at a retailer (who doesn't roast, but buys from a local roaster), and 
all the coffee looked pretty ... it was roasted to look pretty. That 
was the standard roaster training, the way new roasters were taught, 
for a long time. "You roast coffee until it expands and colors to an 
even, attractive appearance. You don't want to see surface wrinkles, 
or patchy coloration, etc." I mean, that will get you into a range of 
roast that is acceptable, and will get you to notice dark spots 
(possible tipping or scorching) and other visual signs of roast 
problems. But coffee doesn't deserve to be roasted using a generic, 
uniform method ... because coffee isn't a uniform product: different 
cultivars, different origins color differently (not to mention how 
different roast systems result in different surface roast 
appearance). Also, like both of you indicate, you judge the roast by 
the results. The results were good, and if they weren't, or if you 
simply wanted to tweak the roast to see what else you could get out 
of the coffee, you would do it. Believe me, there are a lot of 
commercial roasters who don't taste their batches, which is the first 
step to ruin. Beyond freshness, a reason one could argue that home 
roasting is actually superior to much "professional" roasting is that 
we all taste what we roast, always. We are intimately involved in 
what we are doing. Anyway, the only other issue raised with bbq drum 
roasting is the "coast" factor in ending the roast/cooling. You need 
to account for that when deciding where to stop roasting. -tom
Paul, just a note here - don't focus so much on the color of the 
beans.  If you were into the 2nd crack a few snaps no way you could 
have a City roast.  I'd focus on the cracks, time between the cracks 
etc.  Some beans look much lighter roasted than others.  Thought I'd 
just make a suggestion.   I suppose, since you were doing a large 
batch - that what you thought was the second crack wasn't - just the 
sound of some late 1st crack beans ---  that's why it is important to 
get a separation between the cracks.  Sounds like the results were 
good - that's what counts.
From: homeroast-admin 
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Paul Jolly
Sent: Sunday, January 07, 2007 12:13 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Colombia Cauca Organic - La Esperanza
I roasted three pounds in the RK drum on Thursday evening.  Stopped 
'just a few snaps' into second crack.  Once cool, I took it inside 
and saw that I had a true City roast---NOT my style, and I feared 
that it might have been skunky.  To be safe (and to aim for a roast 
that's more to my liking) I dropped two more pounds into the roaster 
and, using a strong flashlight, didn't stop until I saw some glints 
of oil on the beans.  Ahh....FC+ or Vienna, what I love to brew 
in the Silvia.
Unable to wait for a proper rest, I ground up some of the City batch 
to smell for skunk.  No skunk!  I then blended the light & darker 
roasts together (after pulling out a half-pound of the light roast, 
just to check it in the coming days with increasing rest times). 
I've been drinking straight espresso & Gibraltars made from the 
melange blend this weekend, and it's really really good.  Muted 
brightness, big body; as a friend of mine said, "Wow--that's robust!" 
Good stuff, that.
Paul
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Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection aroundhttp://mail.yahoo.com--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

13) From: Les
Tom,
One of the big advantages of drum roasting is you are not sight dependent
when you roast.  You have to develop all of the other senses that are much
more reliable.  I remember roasting my one expensive pound of *Guatemala Cup
of Excellence #1 -El Injerto*.  The beans came out ugly and wrinkled and I
thought I had ruined the roast!  However, everything went as planned and all
the variables except "look" had been accounted for.  Time, temp, profile,
1st crack all happened the way the should have.  My worry was dispelled by
two things.  First, I re-read your notes: "This City roast does not have an
even surface appearance, still rather wrinkly."  So I breathed a sigh of
relief knowing that my ugly beans matched your city roast. Second, the
flavor was outstanding!  Who cares what it looks like.  After going through
the Mazzer Major, I saw some very beautiful ground coffee, the same as any
other, and the grind aroma was stunning!  So thanks for the write ups Tom,
they are a life saver at times.
Les
On 1/9/07, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee 
wrote:
<Snip>


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