HomeRoast Digest


Topic: brew method poll (21 msgs / 592 lines)
1) From: Kevin
I have a West Bend drip brewer and think I figured out why all the
buzz over a Technivorm.  My West Bend gets the water to 195-199 but
not when the water first hits the grinds.  It takes roughly 1/2 cup to
1cup of water to go through the heater and pump for the heater to get
hot enough to heat the water to ~200F.  I figure the Technivorm get
the first drop of water to on the grinds at 200F?
Since I don't have the counter space at the moment  for a Technivorm
or espresso equipment, I was hoping a French Press was the next best
thing to getting the most flavor out of my homeroast.  I've been using
it for the past week over the West Bend and I can taste a difference.
I guess my two questions in a nut shell are:
1) How many people use a French Press for their morning brew?
2) How does the brew quality of a FP compare to a that of a Technivorm?
-- 
My home coffee roasting blog:http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/Kevin

2) From: Laura Micucci
I use a french press almost exclusively except when I'm home druing the day and drink more than I use my vacuum pot.  Don't have a Technivorm so I can't speak for that.
Kevin  wrote:  I have a West Bend drip brewer and think I figured out why all the
buzz over a Technivorm. My West Bend gets the water to 195-199 but
not when the water first hits the grinds. It takes roughly 1/2 cup to
1cup of water to go through the heater and pump for the heater to get
hot enough to heat the water to ~200F. I figure the Technivorm get
the first drop of water to on the grinds at 200F?
Since I don't have the counter space at the moment for a Technivorm
or espresso equipment, I was hoping a French Press was the next best
thing to getting the most flavor out of my homeroast. I've been using
it for the past week over the West Bend and I can taste a difference.
I guess my two questions in a nut shell are:
1) How many people use a French Press for their morning brew?
2) How does the brew quality of a FP compare to a that of a Technivorm?
-- 
My home coffee roasting blog:http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/KevinLaura
  Making the world a better place one bean at a time.
  www.freshroastedforyou.com

3) From: Larry Johnson
Bodum FP Monday - Friday, Bialetti Moka on Sat - Sun (sometimes). Love 'em
both, but no Technivorm, so I can't say.
Larry J (Lilboybrew)...no answers but posting away anywho....
-- 
"Having a positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it annoys
enough people to make it worth the effort."
On 1/7/07, Laura Micucci  wrote:
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4) From: Rich M
Kevin-
I use a FP almost exclusively. Once you get a system down, it doesn't  
disrupt my morning routine at all.  I think it is far superior to our  
old delonghi drip, which my wife still uses. I'll be ordering a  
Technivorm within a couple of weeks to replace the delonghi, but I  
doubt that I'll ever give up my FP. I'll let you know how the new  
equipment compares.
Rich M
On Jan 7, 2007, at 9:16 PM, Kevin wrote:
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5) From: Darliene Stanhope
I use a Bodum FP at home and the Aeropress at work.  I don't have a
Technivorm.
On 1/7/07, Larry Johnson  wrote:
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6) From: Ed Needham
I occasionally use a press pot (French Press), but usually use a Chemex. 
Occasionally, I add grounds to a little one cup glass teapot and infuse with 
hot water, steep and pour through a small micropore filter directly into a 
cup.  This is a very pleasurable cup, similar to a press pot, but cleanup is 
easier.
Never used a TV, but the differences would be pretty easy to imagine.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

7) From: Jerry Procopio
I have found that different methods of brewing will give amazingly 
different results when brewing the same coffee.  One day I conducted a 
blind test with the Technivorm, Chemex, FP, vac pot, and an Americano 
pulled from my Isomac.  After pouring, my wife scrambled the cups so 
only she knew which was which.  The Americano was obvious because of the 
crema that remained on top but the rest were really "blind".  I cannot 
say that (other than the vac pot cup) one was "better" than the other, 
but they were each "different".  So different in fact that it was hard 
to believe that they were all made from the same coffee.  I think the FP 
actually had the most pleasant taste. The Americano, because of the 
espresso extraction was the most robust and had the best lingering 
aftertaste. The Chemex and TV were close (and I actually guessed them 
wrong both times I played this little game).  The vacuum pot (brewed 
with a glass cory rod) was good, but unimpressive.
I have been using a TV for my morning brew for slightly over a year now. 
  It has become my preferred method of brewing because it makes a good 
cup, brewed at the right temperature, with such ease.  I do, however, 
sometimes use the other methods of brewing after I have had my morning 
fix.  My favorite, and the one that I usually use when I am 
entertaining, is the Chemex.  I think I get my best and most consistent 
brews with that method.  Next on my list is the press pot.  Once you 
figure out the right grind, it makes a lovely cup, but is not nearly as 
"clean" as the TV or Chemex, or even a vac pot.  I have 3 vac pots and 
have never been real happy with the results.  I live at sea level and I 
think that the vac pot tends to brew too hot.  That may not be the real 
problem, but I've just never gotten the vac pot to produce as good a cup 
as any of the other methods I have mentioned.
So to answer your question Kevin, I think the brew quality of the FP 
compares favorably with the TV.  It produces a good flavorful cup, 
although maybe a little "muddy".  The TV is easier and cleaner, and 
cleanup is certainly easier and less messy, but if I didn't have a TV, I 
would be happy drinking press pot coffee every morning.
You might also consider a Chemex.  It stores easily out of sight and 
makes an excellent brewed cup.
Just my 12¢ worth!
JavaJerry
RK Drum roasting in Chesapeake, VA
Kevin wrote:
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8) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Kevin,
     I have used a FP and Chemex, but not a TV. I do know that you cannot go
wrong with a FP, and with it, you will have complete control over brew water
temp. One possible drawback though, is that grinds continue to release
compounds into brew at a very slow rate if you continue to let coffee sit in
the press. Personally, when I drink FP, I don't mind it, and just enjoy this
characteristic of one of the beautiful idiosynchrasies of this brewing
method (of course, the brew is usually gone fairly quickly as well). The
other problem is if you like to make a pot big enough to sip on for next 30
minutes, it won't keep the brew hot this long (although you'd be surprised
at how long the thick-walled carafe actually keeps the brew fairly hot).You
can kill both birds with one stone, however, by pouring brew into thermos
after brewing.
     From my experience, like choosing a roaster, every brew method is
unique, and carries with it its own set of advantages and disadvantages.
French press will produce a cup which represents steeping of larger grind
coffee in hot water over 3-4 minutes, while allowing nearly ALL compounds
released by water extraction to pass through filter. Gold filter with any
drip (manual or auto) will produce a cup representative of smaller grind
coffee steeping in hot water for ~30 seconds- 2 minutes, while allowing
nearly ALL compounds released by water extraction to pass through filter.
Each of these methods will produce a markedly different cup, because grind
size and extraction time are different. Analization of chemical profiles in
each cup will reveal markedly different flavor/chemical profiles (chemicals
present in each cup will be ~ same, but quantity of EACH chemical will be
different). This all goes without mentioning the fines that always make
their way into the final brew with these two (non-paper filter) methods.
These fines will continue to steep over time, and may even make their way
onto your palate (some may like, some may dislike...).
     Chemex, on the other hand, uses a patented type of filter that is
supposed to trap bitters, while still preserving "good" oils in the final
cup. I don't know if I agree whole-heartedly that this is what's going on,
but the final cup is very good, and the filter does not take away too much
flavor.
     Probably the best way to decide on a brewer is to compare each, and
then settle on the one that produces the flavor profile YOU like most. Not
the easiest on the wallet, but makes most sense. Also, if you feel two
methods of brewing are equally satisfying, ease of cleanup may then become a
factor (Chemex= much easier to clean up than FP). I will say, though that
once I tried Americanos I have never gone back. I now brew all my coffees
with this method almost exclusively. I also always create a much bigger mess
when brewing Americanos than with any other brew method (sweep up grinds on
counter, clean brew head, backflush, etc.)...But just so hard to beat
pressure extraction as a brew method. Cheers!

9) From: Justin Schwarz
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I use a Chemex , Aeropress, Moka pot, immersion W/Swissgold, Krups  
autodrip, and sometimes a melitta cone.  I go through phases where I  
prefer one method over another, I am never disappointed when I make  
it back around to the chemex, I do have to heavily rinse or boil the  
brown paper filters though.
Justin Schwarz
houstini
If there is anything worth doing, it's worth doing right.
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I use a Chemex , Aeropress, =
Moka pot, immersion W/Swissgold, Krups autodrip, and sometimes a melitta =
cone.  I go through phases where I prefer one method over another, I =
am never disappointed when I make it back around to the chemex, I do =
have to heavily rinse or boil the brown paper filters =
though.
 Justin =
Schwarzhoustini
If there is anything worth = doing, it's worth doing right.

= --Apple-Mail-3-957154468--

10) From: Dan Kellgren
I'll weigh in here too... I'm FP every cup as well.  I'm get much better
flavors with my pressed brews than I do with automatic drips.  It definitely
takes more prep time than many of the other methods, but it's just part of
my morning ritual - er - routine I mean.
Dan K
On 1/7/07, Kevin  wrote:
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11) From: David F Iseminger
I am french press when I am not using my espresso machine, I don't own a
drip machine anymore

12) From: Barry Luterman
I guess if one can be a tea pot then one can be a French Press.

13) From: raymanowen
Interesting point, Kevin-
 You asked,
"1) How many people use a French Press for their morning brew? Not I.  Ray'=
s
way is a lot of work.
2) How does the brew quality of a FP compare to a that of a Technivorm?" Ar=
e
you willing to work?
"...Technivorm get the first drop of water to on the grinds at 200F?"  Mayb=
e
the third drop!
I think most of the equipment used for brewing coffee does not actually bre=
w
coffee at 200° F, even though the TechniVorm absolutely dispenses water a=
t
exactly 200°F, unless I have neglected to descale its internal plumbing.
That'll be my next trick, thank you.
Guess what? The coffee grounds are at room temperature, or lower if I flash
froze the beans prior to grinding. [Why? Cold beans tend to crack more than
tear. Fewer fines than the normal nil from BUFF.]
Assume no flash freeze- the grounds are at 70° room temp in the TV cone. =
To
cut to the chase, I probed the Wonderful smelling, blooming brew in the
basket as it was more than 1/2 full and draining into the carafe. The
highest temperature I saw was 187° F, even though the heater was dispensi=
ng
200.0° hot water out the arm.
Maybe I should immerse the entire filter/ cone assembly in boiling water
just prior to adding grounds and brewing. It will still lose heat by
radiation and convection.
With some work, the TechniVorm is well able to match a press brew. Flash
freeze 40g beans, grind at 52 pitch setting, Gold filter, well-known TV
brewing method per Tom @ SM's.
I want to practice on some good espresso gear. I guess I don't yet own it..=
.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?

14) From: Les
I pulled out my depression glass Vacuum Pot this morning and had a wonderfu=
l
vac pot of Yirg.  Usually when I am in a hurry, it it the Technivorm.  If I
am not in a hurry, it is the Olympia Cremina.  I had an awesome Americano
yesterday.  Instead of milk in the steam pitcher, some good water and in
less than 30 sec it was nice an hot for an Americano.
Les
On 1/8/07, raymanowen  wrote:
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water
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ing.
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ore
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.
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e
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sing
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15) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Well Cremina Cricket, don't need no steenkin' water wand! :-)
miKe  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Les
Sent: Monday, January 08, 2007 7:59 PM
I pulled out my depression glass Vacuum Pot this morning and had a wonderful
vac pot of Yirg.  Usually when I am in a hurry, it it the Technivorm.  If I
am not in a hurry, it is the Olympia Cremina.  I had an awesome Americano
yesterday.  Instead of milk in the steam pitcher, some good water and in
less than 30 sec it was nice an hot for an Americano. 
 
Les

16) From: TERRY TITSWORTH
I use a french press every day but in the pour over mode. It would be so
much better if my employer would pipe in water and a sink to my cubicle but
since they haven't i do what is the easiest for clean up. I presently use a
cheapy wire screen filter (Swissgold wantabe) and paper #4 cone filters. I
know, I'm missing a lot of the true coffee flavors because of the paper but
it makes clean up a snap since my trash can is within the radius of my
chain.
I'm kidding, there is really no chain, they are afraid it would cause
problems with the electrical force field.
TerryT
On 1/8/07, Dan Kellgren  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Start HOT and work your way Down...
Peppers AND Coffee.
[|:{O....[|:{U...
(I'm the tall guy in the middle)

17) From: Dan Mouer
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
For me, this morning, it was a medium roast Guatemala SHB roasted =
yesterday afternoon as the pilot project in my brand new ancient Poppery =
I. Brewed in my polycarbonate unbreakable French Press!
Dan M

18) From: MichaelB
Steaming the water aerates it and livens up the taste of
a "Cremicano". Steam it right in the serving cup to preheat and for
convenience. Then pull the shot on top. It tastes the same as water added
after but looks so much prettier floating on top.
Could it get any better? Panama Carmen Estate COE #3. Just a few more
chances to enjoy these exquisite coffees. And only 7 cents per sip.
In answer to OP, at home a French press in morning is usually second choice
to a cappuccino to start the day with espressos and Americanos to follow.
But on the road the French press is always the way to start the day. I brew
a cup in the room and carry it down to breakfast. And then I just have to
guard the cup from waiters who want to contaminate it with that hot
liquid they carry around from table to table. And they always ask "Are you
sure you don't want some more?"  Am I sure? :-0. I take a sip of the
homeroast and watch others drinking the other stuff. Makes being on the road
a little more bearable.
On 1/9/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
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--
MichaelB

19) From: Sandy Andina
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At home, for me it's a Technivorm in the morning (supplemented  
sometimes by another pot brewed simultaneously in a Starbucks Barista  
Aroma if everyone will be guzzling coffee at the same time). Both  
drip machines use Swissgold filters.  For a leisurely cup (other than  
espresso and espresso drinks), it's the Aeropress or a FP.  Each  
method yields a different cup--one not necessarily better than the  
other.
On the road, if the family is drinking, I use the hotel coffee  
machine with my own gold filter; for one or two cups in the morning,  
sometimes a pair of travel presses; for a lazy cuppa at night (or if  
it's only me in the room), then the Aeropress.
On Jan 9, 2007, at 7:42 AM, TERRY TITSWORTH wrote:
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Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
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At home, for me it's a =
Technivorm in the morning (supplemented sometimes by another pot brewed =
simultaneously in a Starbucks Barista Aroma if everyone will be guzzling =
coffee at the same time). Both drip machines use Swissgold filters.  =
For a leisurely cup (other than espresso and espresso drinks), it's the =
Aeropress or a FP.  Each method yields a different cup--one not =
necessarily better than the other.
On the road, if the family = is drinking, I use the hotel coffee machine with my own gold filter; for = one or two cups in the morning, sometimes a pair of travel presses; for = a lazy cuppa at night (or if it's only me in the room), then the = Aeropress.  On Jan 9, 2007, at 7:42 AM, TERRY TITSWORTH = wrote:
I use a french press every day but in the pour over = mode. It would be so much better if my employer would pipe in water and = a sink to my cubicle but since they haven't i do what is the easiest for = clean up. I presently use a cheapy wire screen filter (Swissgold = wantabe) and paper #4 cone filters. I know, I'm missing a lot of the = true coffee flavors because of the paper but it makes clean up a snap = since my trash can is within the radius of my chain. I'm = kidding, there is really no chain, they are afraid it would cause = problems with the electrical force field.   = TerryT   On 1/8/07, = Dan Kellgren <dkellgren> = wrote: I'll = weigh in here too... I'm FP every cup as well.  I'm get much better = flavors with my pressed brews than I do with automatic drips.  It = definitely takes more prep time than many of the other methods, but it's = just part of my morning ritual - er - routine I mean. =   Dan K   On 1/7/07, Kevin = <hokies1999> wrote: = I have a West Bend drip = brewer and think I figured out why all the buzz over a = Technivorm.  My West Bend gets the water to 195-199 but not when = the water first hits the grinds.  It takes roughly 1/2 cup = to 1cup of water to go through the heater and pump for the heater to = get hot enough to heat the water to ~200F.  I figure the = Technivorm get the first drop of water to on the grinds at = 200F? Since I don't have the counter space at the moment  for = a Technivorm or espresso equipment, I was hoping a French Press was = the next best thing to getting the most flavor out of my = homeroast.  I've been using it for the past week over the West = Bend and I can taste a difference. I guess my two questions in a = nut shell are: 1) How many people use a French Press for their = morning brew? 2) How does the brew quality of a FP compare to a that = of a Technivorm? -- My home coffee roasting blog: http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/ = Kevin homeroast = mailing list =http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change = your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go = to =">http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
-- Start = HOT and work your way Down... Peppers AND = Coffee. [|:{O....[|:{U... (I'm the tall guy in the = middle) Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.com = = --Apple-Mail-28--1051979392--

20) From: Frank Parth
<Snip>
Kevin,
I normally use a FP, but my better half does it a little differently. She lets the coffee steep in a FP, but instead ofusing the press, she just decants through a very fine kitchen sieve. The result has a lot more creama on top and has abetter flavor.
Frank Parth

21) From: MichaelB
Frank,
There is a way to maximize and preserve crema directly in the French press.
Try this:
After adding water to the press, stir the slurry very gently just to ensure
all grinds are wetted. Don't agitate too much. Then immediately put plunger
in place and lower it very slowly and gently about a quarter inch below the
surface. This will allow the remaining bloom and crema to rise to the top
above the plunger and stay there without being disturbed again. Then when
time is up, press plunger all the way down and pour into cup. The entire top
of the cup is typically covered with crema. Enjoy.
On 1/10/07, Frank Parth  wrote:
<Snip>
--
MichaelB


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