HomeRoast Digest


Topic: monsooned beans (3 msgs / 95 lines)
1) From: Neil Johnson
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I've been roasting at home for about 6 months now. After "guessing" for
a while with other people's blend recipes, I've now come to the
conclusion that I want to find the individual flavours that I like and
put them together myself. Quite the task for a marginally educated
newbie but it's fun so whatever. I've read through the tom's blending
tips. I'm starting by looking for a base coffee where I'm first sampling
the monsooned malabar.
I'm roasting for espresso. Most of what I've roasted thus far has been,
by my eye, fullcity+ to light vienna so for a change I've decided to
back off on the roast to see what I'm missing. Round 1 was about
fullcity, barely into second crack. There was a flavour that I've tasted
in other coffees that I wasn't ready for. Tom describes the beans as
"...almost musty..." and I should "...be prepared for an unusual
cup...". I think I got that. It wasn't bad but it was overpowering (for
me anyway). Assuming roast level matters on the "almost musty" flavour,
how dark can I roast to moderate but not lose that flavour? Round 2 is
later this week.
thanks

2) From:
Neil:
Every bean I buy I use as a single origin espresso. It is amazing what you find in the different coffees for sure...
I also use all my coffee for cafe cremas. When friends come by if they want a "full cup" of coffee I use two or three shots of espresso to make them a 6 or 8oz americano.
I used to roast a bit too dark; I have backed off as well and find more flavors, ones that I missed with making the roast too dark. Dark roast does not equal espresso; remember it is the process of pulling the shot that makes it espresso.
Keep us posted Neil.
regards,
ginny
---- Neil Johnson  wrote: 
<Snip>

3) From: miKe mcKoffee
Musty, funky, deep and brooding, what Zombie's would drink if they drank
coffee is what Monsooned Malabar is all about. I wouldn't even attempt to
get a balanced shot from any roast level of MM, don't think it's possible,
it has virtually no acidity. Malabar is normally used as a bass note and
mouth feel component of espresso blends not an SO espresso. As with about
any predominant coffee trait roasting darker can have the roast taste itself
eclipse the coffee's inherent tastes.
 
I'm a firm believer to get good at blending one must first get good at
knowing individual coffees. 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee 
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc: http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm
Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Neil Johnson
	Sent: Monday, January 08, 2007 7:41 AM
	I've been roasting at home for about 6 months now. After "guessing"
for a while with other people's blend recipes, I've now come to the
conclusion that I want to find the individual flavours that I like and put
them together myself. Quite the task for a marginally educated newbie but
it's fun so whatever. I've read through the tom's blending tips. I'm
starting by looking for a base coffee where I'm first sampling the monsooned
malabar.
	I'm roasting for espresso. Most of what I've roasted thus far has
been, by my eye, fullcity+ to light vienna so for a change I've decided to
back off on the roast to see what I'm missing. Round 1 was about fullcity,
barely into second crack. There was a flavour that I've tasted in other
coffees that I wasn't ready for. Tom describes the beans as "...almost
musty..." and I should "...be prepared for an unusual cup...". I think I got
that. It wasn't bad but it was overpowering (for me anyway). Assuming roast
level matters on the "almost musty" flavour, how dark can I roast to
moderate but not lose that flavour? Round 2 is later this week.
	thanks


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