HomeRoast Digest


Topic: winner announcement (4 msgs / 101 lines)
1) From: Sheila Quinn
Just a quick note that the winner of the French Press (along with a 
small assortment of beans) is Dennis True. I had my son draw a name from 
a coffee decanter a few minutes ago.
Congratulations, Dennis!
A big thank you to all who participated. I hope I can do another contest 
soon - this was fun!
Happy roasting,
Sheila

2) From: Dave
Congratulations Dennis!
I was hoping to win myself, oh well;)
Put it to good use!
Dave
On 1/12/07, Sheila Quinn  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Dave
Some days, it's just not worth
chewing through the leather straps

3) From: Patrick S. Harper
Congrats, Looks like I will have to pick one up this weekend :)  I have
never tried it but had a lot of people tell me they really like it.  I am
looking forward to getting a grinder (nomenclature to be determined) and a
new coffee pot (same thing)  I figure since Coffee is a major part of what I
consume daily it is worth it.  and if not, then ohh well :)  I figure a two
- three pot a day habit deserves good gear.  I might have to move to a
bigger roaster though, I am having to roast almost daily to keep up with
what I am drinking and I am noticing that several of you let it rest for
more than the 12 - 36 hour max mine gets.  What is recommended for resting
and what is too much?  I ask that knowing it might be a can-o-worms and I am
sorry if it is.

4) From: raymanowen
I went nuts and roasted 5# of different coffees in my HG/DB setup one
weekend, before I remembered I only have a 1-2 pound per week habit. It's
much less if I'm on a green or white tea binge.
Then I read a post of Ginny's that Horse is very good on a ten day rest. It
was wildly good at that point! It seems to be a phenomenon reserved to the
Ethiopians I've roasted so far (Harar- Horse, Sidamo, Yirg).
Just remember, no matter how good and expensive the beans and other
equipment you use, everything is better with a better grinder. The grinder
can wreck everything, or have a limited life span of, say, 3 or 4 years.
If you replace burrs annually and wear out the whole thing a couple of
times, You'll spend a pile of money in 10 years. For what? The pleasure of a
deteriorating grind quality week-by-week and month-by-month.
You'll start off great when it's brand new. In six months, if you inspect
the grounds with a 10X loupe or a 25X microscope, perhaps they'll still be
good enough.
Fuzzy coffee chunks are grounds with the fines attached.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
The It'll Do Coffee shop-


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