HomeRoast Digest


Topic: PIEROGIS! (Was Re: +coffee crisis at work) (30 msgs / 1442 lines)
1) From: Scot Murphy
On Jan 12, 2007, at 9:56 PM, Lynne wrote:
<Snip>http://www.magma.ca/~pfeiffer/sharon/veg.htmPIEROGI FILLED WITH SAUERKRAUT AND MUSHROOMS (Pierogi z Kiszonej  
Kapusty)
Another favourite of mine. Peter and I had our first try at making  
them and you should have seen the mess we made in the kitchen!! There  =
is a variety of filling which you can try. Some use potatoes or  
mushrooms and some like it sweet and fill them with fruit. It is  
recommended that if you use mashed potatoes, the filling should be  
made at least a day in advance and refrigerated to allow it to dry.
For the dough:
300g plain flour
1 egg
salt
warm water
For the filling:
450g sauerkraut
150g butter
1 onion
110g fresh mushrooms
sour cream to serve
To make the dough, sift the flour, add the egg, salt and sufficient  
warm water to make a loose dough which holds in shape. Divide the  
dough into quarters and roll out thinly. Cut out circles 8.5cm in  
diameter.
To make the filling, chop the sauerkraut finely and saute in 50g of  
butter. Chop the onion and fry in 25g butter. Dice the mushrooms and  
fry in remaining butter. Mix everything together.
Place a heaped tablespoon of filling on each circle, fold over and  
press the edges firmly together to prevent them from opening while  
cooking. They should be well filled. Bring some salted water to boil  
and drop the pierogi (a few at a time). When they rise to the  
surface, turn the heat down and simmer for 5 minutes. Drain and serve  =
with sour cream. Serves 8.
-----http://www.newpoland.com/recipes_PIEROGI.htmHome > Polish Recipes > Pierogi
Polish Recipes
How to Prepare
Beef filling
Cabbage filling
Cheese filling
Fruit filling
Mushroom filling
Potato filling
Sausage filling
more: Main Page
HOW TO PREPARE
6 servings
2 Eggs
1/2 c Water
2 c Flour
1/2 ts Salt
Pepper to taste
Mound flour on kneading board and make hole in center. Drop eggs into  =
hole and cut into flour with a knife. Add salt and water and knead  
until firm. Let rest for 10 minutes covered with a warm bowl. Divide  
dough in halves and roll thin. Cut circles with a large biscuit  
cutter. Place a small mound of filling a little to one side on each  
round of dough. Moisten edge with a little water, fold over and press  =
edges firmly together. Be sure they are well sealed to prevent the  
filling from running out. Drop the pierogi into salted boiling water.  =
Cook gently for 3 to 5 minutes. Lift out of water carefully with a  
perforated spoon. The dough has a tendency to dry while you are  
working. A dry dough will not seal completely. We suggest rolling out  =
a large circle of dough, placing small mounds of filling far enough  
apart to allow for cutting, and folding the dough over the mounds of  
filling. Then cut with a small biscuit cutter and seal firmly. Never  
crowd or pile pierogi. The uncooked will stick and the cooked will  
lose shape and lightness.
Note: Pierogi can be frozen after boiling and they keep well. I  
prefer all my pierogi fried in butter and onions and seasoned with  
salt and pepper. They should be fried on a medium low heat till  
golden brown.
back to top
Beef Filling
4 serving
1 lg Onion, sliced
2 tb Margarine
1 3/4 c ground Beef
3/4 c Cooked rice
2 ts Beef broth
3 ts Hot water
1 tb Parsley, chopped
Salt and Pepper to taste
Sauté onion in margarine. Stir in meat and rice. Dissolve bouillon in  =
hot water. Add to meat mixture with parsley and salt & pepper to taste.
back to top
Cabbage Filling
12 serving
1 Head cabbage
7 Cans of sauerkraut 10 oz. cans
1 Small onion
1 Clove of garlic
10 tb butter
Salt and Pepper to taste
Parboil cabbage in boiling water for ten to fifteen minutes. Rinse,  
drain, cool, and thoroughly wring moisture from cabbage and  
sauerkraut; set aside. The drier the cabbage and sauerkraut the less  
time required to complete cooking. Sauté onion and garlic in 2 Tbsp.  =
butter. Add cabbage and sauerkraut and remainder of butter; cook for  
approximately one half hour or until cabbage is soft and mixture is  
"reasonably" dry. It is important that the mixture not be too moist  
in order to prevent wetting dough during the filling process ... wet  
dough will cause pierogi to break open during cooking!
Allow mixture to stand in refrigerator (in covered bowl) for twenty  
four hours
prior to filling pierogi dough.
back to top
Cheese Filling
8 servings
2 c Cottage or farmers cheese
2 Eggs (slightly beaten)
2 tb Sugar
2 tb Butter
6 tb Currants (optional)
1/2 ts Cinnamon (optional)
1/2 c Raisins (optional)
Salt and Pepper to taste
Cream eggs and butter together. Add other ingredients and mix well.  
Note: If using cottage cheese, use only the egg yolks.
back to top
Fruit Filling
4 servings
2 c Pitted cherries, blueberries, or apples
3/4 c Water
1/3 c Sugar (optional)
1/2 ts Cinnamon or cardamom
1 ts Lemon juice
3 tb Dry bread crumbs
Salt and Pepper to taste
Combine fruit water and sugar in saucepan. bring to boil. Simmer  
until fruit is tender and water is almost gone. Remove from heat.  
mash slightly with potato masher. Add cinnamon and lemon juice. Cook  
and stir over low heat until thick. Stir in enough bread crumbs to  
further thicken.
back to top
Mushroom Filling
4 servings
2 pkg Mushrooms, soaked and chopped
1 lb Button mushrooms
1/2 Medium onion, chopped
Salt and Pepper to taste
Soak Shitake mushrooms in warm water for at least an hour. Chop 1 lb  
button mushrooms roughly and 1/2 medium onion and sauté in butter  
until mushrooms cook down. Chop Shitake mushrooms fine and add  
mushrooms (and water they have been soaked in) in the to pan & simmer  =
5-6 min, until liquid starts to evaporate. Salt & pepper lightly.  
(This holds nicely in the refrigerator - if you make the mushrooms  
the day before you make the pierogi's, they will absorb more flavor  
from the cooking liquid - or so it seems, but I'm not a chemist).
back to top
Potato Filling
12 servings
2 lb Potatoes (6 medium)
1/2 lb Butter
1 Minced onion (optional)
Salt and Pepper to taste
Cook potatoes till tender, drain well. Add butter, salt and pepper,  
onion and mash. When mixture is cool it is ready to use. Note: You  
may wish to combine cheese, or sauerkraut with potatoes; if so, it is  =
best to combine 2/3 mashed potatoes to 1/3 other ingredients.
back to top
Sausage Filling
4 servings
10 oz Kielbasa, skin and chop
1/2 c Cheese, grated
1/2 c Mushrooms, chopped
1/4 c Bread crumbs, fine and dry
1 Egg
Salt and Pepper to taste
Fry the kielbasa in a pan and mix all ingredients together.
back to top
---
"You were sick, but now you're well again, and there's work to do."
                           --Kilgore Trout

2) From: Scot Murphy
On Jan 12, 2007, at 10:27 PM, Scot Murphy wrote:
<Snip>
Here's a recipe for the dough that uses sour cream--AND potatoes!http://www.librarytv.org/polish.htmlPierogi Dough
1 lrg.	Idaho potato
1 Tbsp. + 1 tsp.	salt
1 3/4 cup	all purpose flour
1 cup	cornstarch or potato starch
1 lrg.	egg
3 1/2 Tbsp.	creme fraiche or sour cream
5 Tbsp.	unsalted butter, melted
Place an unpeeled potato in a large saucepan and cover by two inches  
with cold water. Add 1 tablespoon salt and bring to a boil. Lower  
hear to medium, and cook until tender, about ten minutes. Drain.  
While still hot, peel and pass through a potato ricer or food mil  
into a large bowl. Sift flour, starch and remaining salt into the  
bowl with the potato. Combine. In a small bowl, whisk together the  
egg, sour cream and butter. Add to the bowl with the potato mixture.  
Mix until well combined.
Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and knead for five  
minutes, until smooth and firm. Let rest, covered for ten minutes.  
Roll dough out on a lightly floured surface to a thickness of  
approximately 1/8 inch thick. Cut the dough with a 3 1/2 inch in  
diameter cookie cutter. Cover with plastic wrap while preparing the  
filling.
---
"You were sick, but now you're well again, and there's work to do."
                           --Kilgore Trout

3) From: Scot Murphy
By the way...has anyone outside of South Bend, IN ever heard of  
Dyngus Day?
On Jan 12, 2007, at 10:27 PM, Scot Murphy wrote:
<Snip>
One with a cheese filling:http://polandpoland.com/polish_recipes.htmlPotato and Cheese Pierogi
This is a recipe for traditional Potato and Cheese pierogi. Serve  
with chopped fried bacon and onions.
Potato and Cheese Filling
1	 	tablespoon grated onion
2	 	tablespoons butter
2	 	cups cold mashed potatoes
1	 	cup cottage cheese (or more)
	salt and pepper
Pierogi
2 1/2	 	cups flour
1/2	 	teaspoon salt
1	 	egg
2	 	teaspoons oil
3/4	 	cup warm water
1.	Potato and Cheese Filling: Cook the onion in butter until tender.
2.	Combine it with potatoes and cheese.
3.	Season to taste with salt and pepper.
4.	Vary the proportions and ingredients in this recipe to suit your  
taste.
5.	Mix the flour with the salt in a deep bowl.
6.	Add the egg, oil and water to make a medium soft dough.
7.	Knead on a floured board until the dough is smooth.
8.	Caution: Too much kneading will toughen the dough.
9.	Divide the dough into 2 parts.
10.	Cover and let stand for at least 10 minutes.
11.	Prepare the filling.
12.	The filling should be thick enough to hold its shape.
13.	Roll the dough quite thin on a floured board.
14.	Cut rounds with a large biscuit cutter, or the open end of a glass.
15.	Put the round in the palm of your hand.
16.	Place a spoonful of filling in it, fold over to form a half  
circle and press the edges together with the fingers.
17.	The edges should be free of filling.
18.	Be sure the edges are sealed well to prevent the filling from  
running out.
19.	Place the pierogi on a floured board or tea towel and then cover  
with another tea towel to prevent them from drying out.
20.	COOKING: Drop a few pierogies into a large quantity of rapidly  
boiling salted water.
21.	Do not attempt to cook too many at a time.
22.	Stir VERY gently with a wooden spoon to separate them and to  
prevent them from sticking to the bottom of the pot.
23.	Continue boiling for 3-4 minutes.
24.	The cooling period will depend upon the size you made it, the  
thickness of the dough and the filling.
25.	Pierogies will be ready when they are puffed.
26.	Remove them with a perforated spoon or skimmer to a colander and  
drain thoroughly.
27.	Place in a deep dish, sprinkle generously with melted butter to  
prevent them from sticking.
28.	Cover and keep them hot until all are cooked.
29.	Serve in a large dish without piling or crowding them.
30.	Top with melted butter- chopped crisp bacon and/or chopped onions  
lightly browned in butter.
31.	REHEATING: One of the great things about pierogies, is that they  
can be made in large quantities, refrigerated, frozen and reheated  
without lost of quality.
32.	Many prefer reheated pierogies as compared to freshly boiled ones.
33.	To re-heat, you can: 1) pan fry pierogies in butter or bacon fat  
until they are light in color or, 2) heat the pierogies in the top of  
a double boiler or in the oven until they are hot and plump or, 3)  
deep fry them.
---
"You were sick, but now you're well again, and there's work to do."
                           --Kilgore Trout

4) From: Scot Murphy
On Jan 12, 2007, at 10:32 PM, Scot Murphy wrote:
<Snip>
I'm not done yet!http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Grandmas-Polish-Perogies/Detail.aspxGrandma's Polish Perogies
SUBMITTED BY: STEPH577
"My grandfather is Polish, and his mother taught my grandmother how  
to make these delicious perogies. The recipe has been in the family  
for generations, with a few alterations of course! Serve plain, or  
with butter, sour cream, bacon, etc. Perfecting the perogie technique  
takes time, and after a while, you will develop your own system."
Original recipe yield:
60 perogies
PREP TIME 	 2 Hrs
READY IN 	 2 Hrs
PHOTO BY: Terri
US	METRIC
SERVINGS     About scaling and conversions
INGREDIENTS
4 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons butter, melted
2 cups sour cream
2 eggs
1 egg yolk
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
8 baking potatoes, peeled and cubed
1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
2 tablespoons processed cheese sauce
onion salt to taste (optional)
salt and pepper to taste
DIRECTIONS
In a large bowl, stir together the flour and salt. In a separate  
bowl, whisk together the butter, sour cream, eggs, egg yolk and oil.  
Stir the wet ingredients into the flour until well blended. Cover the  
bowl with a towel, and let stand for 15 to 20 minutes.
Place potatoes into a pot, and fill with enough water to cover. Bring  
to a boil, and cook until tender, about 15 minutes. Drain, and mash  
with shredded cheese and cheese sauce while still hot. Season with  
onion salt, salt and pepper. Set aside to cool.
Separate the perogie dough into two balls. Roll out one piece at a  
time on a lightly floured surface until it is thin enough to work  
with, but not too thin so that it tears. Cut into circles using a  
cookie cutter, perogie cutter, or a glass. Brush a little water  
around the edges of the circles, and spoon some filling into the  
center. Fold the circles over into half-circles, and press to seal  
the edges. Place perogies on a cookie sheet, and freeze. Once frozen,  
transfer to freezer storage bags or containers.
To cook perogies: Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a  
boil. Drop perogies in one at a time. They are done when they float  
to the top. Do not boil too long, or they will be soggy! Remove with  
a slotted spoon.
Tips
For best results, choose potatoes that have as little water in them  
as possible such as Russets.
Choose a rolling pin that is very heavy - it will be easier to roll  
out the dough.
The perogies are less likely to burst during cooking if they are  
frozen when you put them in the boiling water.
---
"You were sick, but now you're well again, and there's work to do."
                           --Kilgore Trout

5) From: Scot Murphy
On Jan 12, 2007, at 10:35 PM, Scot Murphy wrote:
<Snip>
But I'm getting there:
(This one is more for the fillings than the dough)http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~atpc/heritage/culture/food/
pierogi-lehrner-k.html
Babcia's Perogi Dough and Sweet Cottage Cheese, Mushroom and Kapusta  
fillings.
From: Katrina Lehrner
Pierogi Dough:
Ingredients:
3 cups flour
1 cup water
1 egg
pinch of salt
¼ stick butter
Preparation:
Make a flour mound on a smooth surface and add egg to the center of  
the mound. Slowly add in water, working dough continuously with hands  =
until smooth and elastic.
Cut dough into workable sections.
On a well floured counter roll out dough fairly thin. Thin enough,  
though, that it is still opaque.
Use a wide mouth glass (like a tumbler) to cut out the round shape.
Fill each perogie with a Polish size teaspoon of the desired filling.
Wet the edges of the circle and fold over one side to form a half moon.
Crimp the edges of the perogie much like you would with an apple pie.  =
If the edges are not properly sealed the perogies will open when boiled.
Boil the perogie until they all float to the top (approx. 5 min). If  
they are over boiled they will fall apart. It is almost guaranteed  
that some perogies will open during the boiling process.
Once boiled drain well, and run under cold water to stop the cooking  
process.
While the perogies are cooling, lightly brown butter in a frying pan.  =
Transfer perogies into frying pan to coat them with the butter. Then  
immediately transfer them to a Corning Ware dish.
Makes approximately 30-40 perogies.
Filling: Sweet Cottage Cheese
Ingredients:
2 pounds pressed cottage cheese
1 egg
1 ½ cup sugar (to taste)
1 tsp. vanilla (optional)
Preparation:
Run the pressed cottage cheese through a food grinder. Do not use a  
food processor, as it will make the cheese gooey.
In a bowl mix together the pressed cottage cheese, egg, and sugar.  
Thoroughly blend until smooth.
Taste, and make sure the mixture is pleasantly sweet, if not, add  
more sugar.
Add vanilla if you want to spice it up a little.
Then fill your perogie.
Filling: Mushroom
Ingredients:
1 pound mushrooms (depending on size of mushrooms and number of perogie)
1 medium onion
¼ stick butter
Preparation:
Sauté mushrooms, onions, and butter until almost all moisture has  
been drawn out of the mushrooms.
Run mixture through the food processor until mushrooms are minutely  
chopped, but not a paste.
Then fill your perogie.
Filling: Kapusta
Ingredients:
½ head cabbage
5-8 dry Polish mushrooms
¼ stick butter
2-3 tbs. flour
Preparation:
Shred cabbage.
Soak dry mushrooms overnight and save juices.
Fill a pot ¼ full with water and add cabbage. Bring to boil and  
simmer until cabbage has become soft (approx. a half-hour).
Finely chop mushrooms and add to pot along with juices.
Simmer until cabbage mixture is moist, but no excess water is found  
in the pot.
In a frying pan, melt butter and mix in flour. Make sure no lumps are  =
left. Brown mixture then add to cabbage mixture.
It is best to make mixture a day in advance to get maximum flavour  
from the kapusta.
It is necessary to add butter to give the necessary fat for flavour
---
"You were sick, but now you're well again, and there's work to do."
                           --Kilgore Trout

6) From: Scot Murphy
On Jan 12, 2007, at 10:35 PM, Scot Murphy wrote:
<Snip>
Another one from the same site as last, but with sour cream in the  
dough:http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~atpc/heritage/culture/food/
pierogi-bonk-janice.html
Pierogi: Dough, sour cream
From: Janice Chlosta Bonk
My favorite dough for pierogi that I got from a Polish friend years ago:
Ingredients:
5-1/2 cups unsifted flour
1 tsp. salt
3 eggs, slightly beaten
1 pint Sour Cream
A nice pliable dough. This recipe will give you 5-6 dozen pirogi,  
depending on the size of your pirogi. For those who have never made  
pirogi, here's a step-by-step procedure --
Preparation:
Roll out some dough on floured surface. Don't roll it out too thick.
Cut out circles. (NOTE: Some years ago I got a Pasta Maker and that's  
the way to go cuz everything goes faster. Just cut off about a 1/2 to  
3/4" thick piece of dough and run it through Past Maker Setting 1,  
then again at Setting 3 and finally at setting of 5. Lay out that  
strip of dough and cut out your circles.)
Take a circle and put a heaping teaspoon of your filling into the  
middle of your dough circle.
Dip your finger into a cup of water and moisten half the edge of the  
circle. Then bring up lower half of circle to meet moistened half and  
seal together with your fingers. If you find your fingers sticking to  
the dough while doing this, dip them into a handy cup of flour.
Then pinch the edges together. Be very careful not to do this with  
your fingernails or you'll puncture the dough.
Lay the completed pirog on a floured surface. Repeat process with all  
your dough circles. When you have a good number of them made you can  
start cooking them.
Before making the pirogi, put on a BIG POT of water on the stove to  
boil. Put some salt and couple of slices of oleo into the water.
Don't have the water boiling too vigorously while cooking the pirogi  
-- just gently. The keyword in making pirogi is GENTLY!
GENTLY slide into the water 12-15 pirogi. Then, with a long wooden  
spoon, GENTLY stir until all the pirogi rise to the top. GENTLY boil  
for 7 minutes.
HAVE READY: 2 bowls filled with cold water.
After the 7 minutes are up then, with a large, plastic, perforated  
ladle spoon (found on at Lechter's which is ideal), GENTLY take out  
the pirogi and place into one bowl of cold water. Then immediately  
(gently) transfer the pirogi into the second bowl of cold water. Let  
them sit until your next group of pirogi have cooked and then put the  
cooled pirogi into a colander to drain.
Keep repeating this process until all the pirogi are cooked and  
cooled. Remember, the key phrase is "Gently does it!"
Depending upon the size of your pirogi, as a rule a dozen pirogi can  
be stored in a 1-qt. size Ziploc heavy freezer bag. One-half dozen  
can be stored in pint sized bags. Freezes well.
TO EAT: I think most people just warm the pirogi in the oven with  
layers of butter/oleo over them. We love to FRY the pirogi slowly  
until golden brown in combination of oleo and cooking oil. Eat to  
your heart's content. Try it - you might like it!!
Fillings for your pierogi:
You can make this with only saurkraut or half saurkraut and head of  
fresh cabbage, or just fresh cabbage. Fresh cabbage should be par- 
boiled and cored. Better yet, before hand, put head of fresh cabbage  
into your freezer. When ready to make pirogi, thaw out the frozen  
fresh cabbage and it'll already be soft enough to work with without  
par-boiling same.
Saurkraut:
4 big cans saurkraut (for 5-6 dozen pirogi).
Put into big pot, cover w/water and parboil a couple of times so it  
wouldn't be too sour (unless you like it real sour).
Pour out into sieve, pour cold water over it, and press out all the  
water best as you can. Put saurkraut through your food grinder along  
with some saltine crackers (crackers help to absorb excess moisture  
of kraut).
In a Dutch oven, put in 1-1/2 sticks oleo; melt down. Add 2 handfuls  
of sauted onions into kraut and mix in well. Salt & pepper to taste.
Fresh cabbage or half fresh/half saurkraut:
Do as you would using just saurkraut. You can also cook some dried  
Polish mushrooms, grind them up and mix into your cabbage filling.
Cheese Fillings:
Hard Farmers Cheese. I have used various cheese fillings over the  
years but the one my menfolk like the best is made with the real,  
hard farmer's cheese. Some places do not carry it but if you have a  
Polish Deli in your vicinity, you should be able to get it there. You  
could even get your Polish dried mushrooms there as well. The cheese  
is hard so you have to break it up and crumble it in your bowl.
To the crumbled up farmers cheese (3-4 packages of it), add 1 egg, 1  
heaping cup sauted onions, salt and pepper to taste.
Should make 5 dozen pirogi.
Cheese & Potato:
Ingredients:
4 packets farmer's cheese (it's much softer than the real hard  
farmer's cheese)
12 oz. low-fat cottage cheese (the dryest kind you can find)
Plain mashed potatoes
1 egg
Sauted onions
Salt & Pepper
Preparation:
Cook 3 large potatoes. Mash good w/3 big wooden spoonfuls of sauted  
onions, salt and pepper to taste. Add this to your cheese, mixing  
well. Add 12 oz. low-fat cottage cheese, mix in well together. Mix in  
1 egg, salt and pepper to taste. If mixture is still rather too soft  
and you have no more mashed potatoes on hand, you can mix in 1/2  
packet of Idaho Granule Dry Potato Mix. Easily makes 6 dozen pirogi.
Recipes handed down by my maternal grandmother - Helena Banas Janas -  
who was born in Rozanka, Markuszowa in what was then under Austrian  
rule and known as Galicia instead of Poland. (Area of Tulkowice and  
Rzeszow). Settled in Chicopee, MA.
Cheese & Potato filling recipe was hers. The other variations were  
from my mother and the ones with only the real hard farmer's cheese  
is mine.
---
"You were sick, but now you're well again, and there's work to do."
                           --Kilgore Trout

7) From: an iconoclast
On 1/12/07, Scot Murphy  wrote:
<Snip>
Wow! Don't you love the internet!  It's just a big library sitting in the
middle of my house. Nirvana.
Take care,
Ann

8) From: Lynne
Thank you Scot, for the recipes! I have no excuse now -
So -
Who wants to come over for dinner??
Lynne
On Jan 12, 2007, at 11:27 PM, Scot Murphy wrote:
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9) From: Lynne
O.K., I just noticed the rest of the recipes you sent! Ha - now I 
REALLY don't have any excuse - but my mom (and, in turn, my grandmother 
[so sad that I never knew her] ) never used sour cream, so I'm going to 
try to replicate her recipe. Hamburg - and I believe onion - filling. 
Boiled, then pan fried in vegetable oil.
Mmmm.
Getting really hungry...
Lynne

10) From: Larry Johnson
You better believe this conversation got a star from me.
My great-grandmother made sauerkraut in an earthenware churn (the same
kind/size that she churned butter in). I've never tasted any since that was
close to hers.
Larry J (Lilboybrew)....time to make some pierogis......
"Truth does not change based on our inability to stomach it."  -   Flannery
O'Connor
On 1/13/07, Lynne  wrote:
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11) From: Lynne
--Apple-Mail-5--680783931
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sigh.... Decided to make some tonight (pierogis). Got the ingredients, =
then my darn knee acted up. Had to get off my feet (enjoyed "Lady of 
the Water" by M. Night Shayalaman instead - good movie, but def. not 
pierogis).
Now I'd like to learn how to make sauerkraut, also. I bought some from =
a raw food restaurant, and it was SO good - nothing like the canned 
variety I we always bought.
Lynne
On Jan 13, 2007, at 9:24 PM, Larry Johnson wrote:
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same 
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Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
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sigh.... Decided to make some tonight (pierogis). Got the ingredients,
then my darn knee acted up. Had to get off my feet (enjoyed "Lady of
the Water" by M. Night Shayalaman instead - good movie, but def. not
pierogis).
Now I'd like to learn how to make sauerkraut, also. I bought some from
a raw food restaurant, and it was SO good - nothing like the canned
variety I we always bought.
Lynne
On Jan 13, 2007, at 9:24 PM, Larry Johnson wrote:
You better believe this conversation got a star from me.
 
My great-grandmother made sauerkraut in an earthenware churn (the same
kind/size that she churned butter in). I've never tasted any since
that was close to hers.
 
Larry J (Lilboybrew)....time to make some pierogis......
 
"Truth does not change based on our inability to stomach it."  -  
Flannery O'Connor
 
 
 
On 1/13/07, Lynne
<<0000,0000,EEEClynnebiz>
wrote: O.K., I just noticed the rest of the recipes you sent! Ha - now I
REALLY don't have any excuse - but my mom (and, in turn, my
grandmother
[so sad that I never knew her] ) never used sour cream, so I'm going to
try to replicate her recipe. Hamburg - and I believe onion - filling.
Boiled, then pan fried in vegetable oil.
Mmmm.
Getting really hungry... 
Lynne
homeroast mailing list
=
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To change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
=
0000,0000,EEEhttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.ht=ml#personalsettings 
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--Apple-Mail-5--680783931--

12) From: Eddie Dove
I moved from Maryland to the "Deep South" ... you should see the faces when
you mention good sauerkraut!  I think they consider that an oxymoron.
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/13/07, Larry Johnson  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/13/07, Larry Johnson  wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Larry Johnson
Not those of us descended from German immigrants. Well; not those of us
descended from German immigrants who kept making kraut after they got here
and handed the knowledge down to their descendants, anyway.
The Clarksville-Cayton area of North Georgia received a relatively large
influx of German immigrants in the early 1700's. My great-grandmother was
descended from those immigrants and made her own kraut. It was fantastic
stuff.
I remember watching her when I was a little kid. She would put a couple of
double handfuls of cut-up cabbage into an earthenware churn, sprinkle
a half-handful (or maybe less, it's hard to remember exact details) of salt
over it, and pound it down with a wooden mallet. Repeat until the churn was
3/4 full. She would then put a plate on top of the cabbage and a big rock on
the plate to hold the cabbage down below the level of the liquid that was
soon to be drawn from the cabbage by the salt.  She would take 3 - 4 layers
of cotton flour sack and tie it over the churn to keep out uninvited guests.
Park in the smokehouse (you don't want this in the house - trust me) until
it has "worked off" (fermentation is complete). I can't remember anything
about how long this took nor the process for transferring the kraut to Mason
jars for storage. I'm sure it's out there on the web somewhere.
Larry J (Lilboybrew)....with the memory of Mawmaw's kraut so vivid it's like
it's really there........
On 1/14/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"Having a positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it annoys
enough people to make it worth the effort."

14) From: Lynne
Sauerkraut was not on the list of my favorites in my younger days. We 
lived closer to my Italian relatives, (there was never a really strong =
Polish community here at that time - even less now), so I missed out on =
a lot of Polish stuff, except for a few things my mother learned to 
cook. It wasn't until last year that I actually tasted real, homemade 
sauerkraut - there's a raw food restaurant in Beverly, MA that sells 
it, and it is exceptional - no at all as strong as the canned variety, =
and much better flavor.
Lynne
On Jan 14, 2007, at 1:21 AM, Eddie Dove wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>

15) From: Sandy Andina
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Having grown up in Brooklyn, I still consider anything but sauerkraut  
and brown mustard on a hot dog an abomination. Here in Chicago almost  
no hot dog stands offer it, not even the ones that grill rather than  
boil their dogs.  They are fond of dumping the contents of the entire  
vegetable crisper on them, plus slathering them with lurid yellow  
mustard and piccallili in a green I have not even seen in nature.   
Whenever I'm back in NYC, I MUST make the pilgrimage to either  
Nathan's or Papaya King to have the real thing!  (And don't get me  
started on ersatz knishes!)
On Jan 14, 2007, at 11:01 AM, Larry Johnson wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-181--596087710
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	charsetO-8859-1
Having grown up in Brooklyn, I =
still consider anything but sauerkraut and brown mustard on a hot dog an =
abomination. Here in Chicago almost no hot dog stands offer it, not even =
the ones that grill rather than boil their dogs.  They are fond of =
dumping the contents of the entire vegetable crisper on them, plus =
slathering them with lurid yellow mustard and piccallili in a green I =
have not even seen in nature.  Whenever I'm back in NYC, I MUST make =
the pilgrimage to either Nathan's or Papaya King to have the real =
thing!  (And don't get me started on ersatz knishes!)
On =
Jan 14, 2007, at 11:01 AM, Larry Johnson wrote:
Not = those of us descended from German immigrants. Well; not those of us = descended from German immigrants who kept making kraut after they got = here and handed the knowledge down to their descendants, anyway. =   The Clarksville-Cayton area of North Georgia = received a relatively large influx of German immigrants in the early = 1700's. My great-grandmother was descended from those immigrants and = made her own kraut. It was fantastic stuff.   I = remember watching her when I was a little kid. She would put a couple of = double handfuls of cut-up cabbage into an earthenware churn, sprinkle = a half-handful (or maybe less, it's hard to remember exact details) of= salt over it, and pound it down with a wooden mallet. Repeat until = the churn was 3/4 full. She would then put a plate on top of the cabbage = and a big rock on the plate to hold the cabbage down below the level of = the liquid that was soon to be drawn from the cabbage by the salt.  = She would take 3 - 4 layers of cotton flour sack and tie it over the = churn to keep out uninvited guests. Park in the smokehouse (you don't = want this in the house - trust me) until it has "worked off" = (fermentation is complete). I can't remember anything about how long = this took nor the process for transferring the kraut to Mason jars for = storage. I'm sure it's out there on the web somewhere. =   Larry J (Lilboybrew)....with the memory of Mawmaw's = kraut so vivid it's like it's really there........   = On 1/14/07, Eddie Dove <southcoastcoffeeroaster@= gmail.com> wrote: I moved from Maryland to the "Deep South" ... you should see = the faces when you mention good sauerkraut!  I think they consider = that an oxymoron. Eddie -- My Home = Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafe =http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - = Searchable Archives http://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ On 1/13/07, Larry = Johnson <lilboybrew > wrote: = You = better believe this conversation got a star from me.   = My great-grandmother made sauerkraut in an earthenware churn (the = same kind/size that she churned butter in). I've never tasted any since = that was close to hers.   Larry J = (Lilboybrew)....time to make some pierogis......   = "Truth does not change based on our inability to stomach it."  = -   Flannery O'Connor     =   On 1/13/07, Lynne <lynnebiz > wrote: = O.K., I just noticed the rest of the recipes you sent! Ha - now I = REALLY don't have any excuse - but my mom (and, in turn, my = grandmother [so sad that I never knew her] ) never used sour cream, = so I'm going to try to replicate her recipe. Hamburg - and I believe = onion - filling. Boiled, then pan fried in vegetable = oil. Mmmm. Getting really hungry... = Lynnehomeroast mailing list =http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To = change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, = unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings=
-- "Having a positive = attitude may not solve all your problems, but it annoys enough people to = make it worth the effort." Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-181--596087710--

16) From: Scot Murphy
On Jan 14, 2007, at 10:59 PM, Sandy Andina wrote:
<Snip>
I live up in Da Burbs, and Franks for the Memories in Mundelein will  
grill your dog and give you grilled (or not) kraut with brown mustard  
on your dog if you ask for it. It must be noted, though, that he is  
originally an upstate New Yorker--Buffalo, in fact. Man, grilled  
kraut and onion on Polish with brown mustard--that's good eats.
Scot "and here I am with nothing but a ham sandwich" Murphy

17) From: Wesley Simon
If you MUST post stuff like this, could you please follow list etiquette and
add "OT:" to the subject line?
On 1/12/07, Scot Murphy  wrote:
<Snip>

18) From: Leo Zick
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
is "PIEROGIS!" misconstrued as a coffee bean or something?  
From: Wesley Simon [mailto:gm.wesley] 
Sent: Monday, January 15, 2007 9:39 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: PIEROGIS! (Was Re: +coffee crisis at work)
If you MUST post stuff like this, could you please follow list etiquette and
add "OT:" to the subject line?
On 1/12/07, Scot Murphy  wrote: 
On Jan 12, 2007, at 10:27 PM, Scot Murphy wrote:
<Snip>
Here's a recipe for the dough that uses sour cream--AND potatoes!http://www.librarytv.org/polish.htmlPierogi Dough
1 lrg.  Idaho potato
1 Tbsp. + 1 tsp.        salt
1 3/4 cup       all purpose flour
1 cup   cornstarch or potato starch
1 lrg.  egg
3 1/2 Tbsp.     creme fraiche or sour cream 
5 Tbsp. unsalted butter, melted
Place an unpeeled potato in a large saucepan and cover by two inches
with cold water. Add 1 tablespoon salt and bring to a boil. Lower
hear to medium, and cook until tender, about ten minutes. Drain. 
While still hot, peel and pass through a potato ricer or food mil
into a large bowl. Sift flour, starch and remaining salt into the
bowl with the potato. Combine. In a small bowl, whisk together the
egg, sour cream and butter. Add to the bowl with the potato mixture. 
Mix until well combined.
Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and knead for five
minutes, until smooth and firm. Let rest, covered for ten minutes.
Roll dough out on a lightly floured surface to a thickness of 
approximately 1/8 inch thick. Cut the dough with a 3 1/2 inch in
diameter cookie cutter. Cover with plastic wrap while preparing the
filling.
---
"You were sick, but now you're well again, and there's work to do." 
                           --Kilgore Trout

19) From: Lynne Biziewski
My goodness, someone is cranky this morning! (Someone pour Wesley a good
cuppa SM's!!)
Lynne
On 1/15/07, Wesley Simon  wrote:
<Snip>

20) From: Dick Williams
I don't think Wesley is cranky.  I personally don't feel using *OT* makes 
it okay to keep posting messages about pierogis, sausage, pigs feet or 
whatever.  This is a coffee mailing list.
Regards,
Rich
On Mon, 15 Jan 2007, Lynne Biziewski wrote:
<Snip>

21) From: Andie Z
This is a coffee list.  Food goes with coffee or coffee with food, 
usually.  I think this list is one of the greatest, because we can go 
off on a tangent once in a while and no one gets uptight.  I think 
Pierogis, Sauerkraut, Kielbasa, and even pig feet go very well with 
Polish Coffee.  It make the list real nice and light 
hearted.  Especially when no one gets upset about it.
Now I need to order the new SM Polish Coffee Tom got on his last trip.
Andie Zajaceskowski
At 10:06 AM 1/15/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: Wesley Simon
I didn't ask anyone to STOP doing it.  I simply asked that they put "OT" in
the subject line so that it can easily be filtered.  I don't particularly
care about those items but others seem to.  I'm not upset about it.   I
subscribed to the list to learn about roasting and brewing of coffee.  If I
were interested in cooking, I'd subscribe to a cooking list.  If I were
interested in jokes and funny pictures, I'd subscribe to a comedy list.
When I start deleting > 75% of the emails from a mailing list (not just this
one) based on the subject line alone, I question if I really want to
continue being a subscriber.  I made a request that the people on the
homeroasters mailing list be responsible for their off-topic contributions
to the mailing list by tagging them as such.  I won't be upset if people
choose to not do it.  I will simply unsubscribe from the list, continue to
watch my RSS feed to see when Tom has new arrivals, and continue to roast
the best coffee I've ever had.
Wes
On 1/15/07, Andie Z  wrote:
<Snip>

23) From: Scot Murphy
On Jan 15, 2007, at 9:06 AM, Dick Williams wrote:
<Snip>
But it's also a community and sometimes, as among friends, topics  
diverge. It'll settle down soon enough. Until then, have a cup and a  
smile.
Scot "thank Bill Cosby" Murphy
---
"You were sick, but now you're well again, and there's work to do."
                           --Kilgore Trout

24) From: Scot Murphy
On Jan 15, 2007, at 9:39 AM, Andie Z wrote:
<Snip>
But will it be as good as last year's Upper Volga SHB?
Scot "it'll never beat Prague Michalek Estate Grade A" Murphy
---
"You were sick, but now you're well again, and there's work to do."
                           --Kilgore Trout

25) From: Brett Mason
Scot...
Smiling is not roasting.
Having a cup is not roasting
Brewing is not roasting.
Grinding is not roasting.
Resting is not roasting.
Cooling is not roasting.
As you can see, smiling is at least six steps from roasting.
Having a cup is five steps from roasting.
If you stole the cup, then stealing is off-topic.
I'm just so totally confused.
Brett
On 1/15/07, Scot Murphy  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

26) From: Sandy Andina
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Agreed. This is not like the Zoss Pens list, where the no-OT policy  
is so strict that we get our knuckles rapped occasionally for talking  
about even paper.
On Jan 15, 2007, at 9:39 AM, Andie Z wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-193--540271153
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	charsetO-8859-1
Agreed. This is not like the =
Zoss Pens list, where the no-OT policy is so strict that we get our =
knuckles rapped occasionally for talking about even =
paper.
On Jan 15, 2007, at 9:39 AM, Andie Z wrote:
This is a coffee list.  Food goes with coffee or coffee = with food, usually.  I think this list is one of the greatest, because = we can go off on a tangent once in a while and no one gets uptight.  I = think Pierogis, Sauerkraut, Kielbasa, and even pig feet go very well = with Polish Coffee.  It make the list real nice and light hearted.  = Especially when no one gets upset about it. Now I need to order = the new SM Polish Coffee Tom got on his last trip. Andie = Zajaceskowski   At 10:06 AM 1/15/2007, = you wrote: I don't think Wesley is cranky.  I = personally don't feel using *OT* makes it okay to keep posting messages = about pierogis, sausage, pigs feet or whatever.  This is a coffee = mailing list. Regards, Rich On Mon, 15 Jan 2007, = Lynne Biziewski wrote: My goodness, someone is cranky this morning! (Someone pour = Wesley a good cuppa SM's!!) Lynne On 1/15/07, Wesley = Simon <gm.wesley> = wrote: If = you MUST post stuff like this, could you please follow list = etiquette and add "OT:" to the subject line? = = homeroast mailing = list =http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To = change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, = unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = -- No virus found in this incoming message. Checked by AVG = Free Edition. Version: 7.5.432 / Virus Database: 268.16.12/628 - = Release Date: 1/15/2007 11:04 AM = Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-193--540271153--

27) From: Wesley Simon
Is there an issue you guys have with following the rules you must have read
*before* you signed up on the list?
Fromhttp://www.sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html:   - Off topic posting is discouraged, but if it is a spinoff of a
   coffee-related thread, please use the subject line convention "OT". OT is
   meant, as they say on the stage, as an "aside." People who consistently
   start off topic threads or don't properly label off topic threads are due
   for removal from the list. OT threads that have political, religious or
   other flashpoint topics and have the intent to antagonize will result in the
   removal of the poster.
On 1/15/07, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>

28) From: Paul Jolly
I agree with Les---off topic posts should at least be preceded with "OT:".  And, while coffee and food do indeed go well together, I'm here to share coffee information...and home-roasting information in particular.  No, this is not a "coffee list"; it was started as a homeroasting list (see the email address?).  While leading off a subject line with OT: is a nicety, I think it serves us all better to try to stick to the topic at hand.  Speaking of which...I've tried the Idido Misty Valley on three days' rest now through an Aeropress, and I'm blown away.  Short of the blueberry monsters, this is exactly what I hope for in a Harar--and it's a Yirg!  Weird...but great.
   
  My two centavos,
   
  Paul
---------------------------------
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29) From: Angelo
Sandy,
Now you've done it!
I live 3 blocks from the Papaya King and have managed to pass the 
store on the way to the subway for a year w/o succumbing to the 
aromas issuing forth. Now, your mere mention of the place will force 
me to give in and have a couple tomorrow.... It's all your fault...
Angelo
Oh, and maybe while I'm there I'll get a cup of coffee to keep this OnT
<Snip>

30) From: Leo Zick
I have a friend that must live in your bldg.. Every time I get off at 86th
and lex I have to run past the store to stop the drooling effect.
Maybe ill go grab some lunch today. :o


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