HomeRoast Digest


Topic: When Tragedy Strikes (5 msgs / 232 lines)
1) From: Aaron
This morning i went through my rictual of making two cups of coffee.
one for the ride to work and one for when I get to work, which I put in 
my Nissan sealable cup I got from SM's.
For some reason the damned seal cup didnt, and the coffee leaked out all 
over the carpet in my car.  The car is about two years old.... oh screw 
the car, my KONA... Ohhhhh the humanities !!!!!!!
Anyone know how to get coffee stains out of carpeting, possibly a freeze 
drying method or some sort of rehydration technique so I might possibly 
salvage a few drops of the golden nectar?
Ok, I guess Ill have to settle for just the stain removal....  talk 
about a rotten way to start the day..
Aaron

2) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-165--715510443
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
Buy some Amodex and a toothbrush or nail brush you don't mind  
sacrificing (the brush that comes with it is too tiny).  Squeeze a  
generous amount of Amodex on to the stain, scrub, and blot with paper  
towels. Repeat till the stain is gone, then apply cold water and blot  
several times to rinse.  You can get Amodex at stationers and art  
supply stores. (Some supermarkets have it too). It uses enzymes  
rather than petroleum distillates and is non-toxic. There is also a  
paste called "World's Best Stain Remover" sold at pen shows that  
feels gritty and smells like sulfur, but is even more effective and  
is likewise non-toxic.  On very fresh coffee (or blood) stains,  
immediately flooding with cold water alone will do the trick.
On Jan 13, 2007, at 1:40 PM, Aaron wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-165--715510443
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Buy some Amodex and a toothbrush =
or nail brush you don't mind sacrificing (the brush that comes with it =
is too tiny).  Squeeze a generous amount of Amodex on to the stain, =
scrub, and blot with paper towels. Repeat till the stain is gone, then =
apply cold water and blot several times to rinse.  You can get Amodex =
at stationers and art supply stores. (Some supermarkets have it too). It =
uses enzymes rather than petroleum distillates and is non-toxic. There =
is also a paste called "World's Best Stain Remover" sold at pen shows =
that feels gritty and smells like sulfur, but is even more effective and =
is likewise non-toxic.  On very fresh coffee (or blood) stains, =
immediately flooding with cold water alone will do the =
trick.
On Jan 13, 2007, at 1:40 PM, Aaron wrote:

Anyone know how to get = coffee stains out of carpeting, possibly a freeze drying method or some = sort of rehydration technique so I might possibly salvage a few drops of = the golden nectar?

Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-165--715510443--

3) From: Lynne Biziewski
Aaron -
I don't know if it'll work for coffee stains, but it's worked for just about
everything else, for me - including some really bad scuff marks left on my
rug by an evil folding chair that the former tenants left in our new apt.
(Evil because we never expected a chair to leave black scuff marks all over
our floor - and rug (which I just advertised to sell).
I used Spray & Wash. Lost the sprayer, just carefully poured some on
straight. Let it sit for awhile, then sopped it up with paper towels.
Disappeared, like magic.
Now I know why my daughter swears by this stuff for her clothes. Never
imagined it'd be so good for rugs!
Lynne
On 1/13/07, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Sean Cary
Oxyclean...not only does it remove the smell from filters, it is an awesome
stain remover...
I need to buy stock in the stuff.
Sean 
Sean M. Cary
Major USMC
Tempus Fugit Memento Mori

5) From: Michael Wascher
There's a pen show  next weekend in
Philly, you should be able to find either stain remover there.
On 1/13/07, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When a person can no longer laugh at himself, it is time for others to
laugh at him." -- Thomas Szasz


HomeRoast Digest