HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Modest Roaster Suggestions - For [Possible] Commercial Endeavor (10 msgs / 200 lines)
1) From: Lynne Biziewski
We have a really nice little florist around the corner. Exceptional designs,
really nice. Been thinking of going in to ask if they need any help (the
commute would kill me, but what the heck ; > } ), when I met the one of the
owners today, as he was walking out, gift basket in hand (my littlest dog is
always such a good intro to conversations). Exchanged a few, brief words,
and while he said they aren't hiring right now, they might soon, as business
is picking up. He told me to stop in to chat sometime...
So here's my idea. I'm going to bring in a few varieties of my homeroasted.
Perhaps I can convince him to include roasted beans w/some of his gift
baskets. And with that idea in mind - I am coming to you, my fellow sages,
for suggestions!
If this takes off (of course, it may or may not), I wouldn't want to
continue roasting in the tiny stovetop pot. I do have a small porch/deck,
but I'd have to run an extension cord out there to roast. IF I were to
invest in a roaster for this type of set up - I'd take it in the kitchen
when I wasn't roasting, but would def. HAVE to use an extension cord (and
I'd hope that wouldn't effect the quality of the roast) - which roaster do
you guys think would be the best for me?
Lynne

2) From: Eddie Dove
Lynne
Is an RK Drum an option for you?  These can do up to 4 lbs. per batch.
Other than that, the Hottop and Gene Cafe will do up to about 300 grams (~10
oz) per batch.
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/13/07, Lynne Biziewski  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's list searchable archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/13/07, Lynne Biziewski  wrote:
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3) From: Coffeenut
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Lynne,
If it were me and there was any prospect of volume, I'd have to recommend a
drum roaster (Ron Kyle's version).  I roast 3lbs a week just for our home
use, had a 1/2lb capacity Alpenrost and tired of having to do 6 roasts (back
to back) to yield 3 lbs of coffee.  Not to mention that I brought the
Alpenrost to an earlier death since it really wasn't designed for the kind
of duty I was putting it through.  A grill roaster will handle the duty and
allow you to roast several pounds of coffee in one cycle.
My 2-cents,
Rick  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Lynne Biziewski
Sent: Saturday, January 13, 2007 6:29 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +Modest Roaster Suggestions - For [Possible] Commercial Endeavor
We have a really nice little florist around the corner. Exceptional designs,
really nice. Been thinking of going in to ask if they need any help (the
commute would kill me, but what the heck ; > } ), when I met the one of the
owners today, as he was walking out, gift basket in hand (my littlest dog is
always such a good intro to conversations). Exchanged a few, brief words,
and while he said they aren't hiring right now, they might soon, as business
is picking up. He told me to stop in to chat sometime... 
So here's my idea. I'm going to bring in a few varieties of my homeroasted.
Perhaps I can convince him to include roasted beans w/some of his gift
baskets. And with that idea in mind - I am coming to you, my fellow sages,
for suggestions! 
If this takes off (of course, it may or may not), I wouldn't want to
continue roasting in the tiny stovetop pot. I do have a small porch/deck,
but I'd have to run an extension cord out there to roast. IF I were to
invest in a roaster for this type of set up - I'd take it in the kitchen
when I wasn't roasting, but would def. HAVE to use an extension cord (and
I'd hope that wouldn't effect the quality of the roast) - which roaster do
you guys think would be the best for me? 
Lynne

4) From: Eddie Dove
The RK Drum can do small batches too.
Eddie
On 1/13/07, Coffeenut  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's list searchable archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

5) From: Lynne Biziewski
Thanks, Rick & Eddie. I completely forgot about the RK drum setup. It does
appeal to me. I'll check out the archives - along with figuring out which
coffees in my stash would be the best to roast & bring to the florist for
sampling.
Wish me luck!
Lynne
(trying to get a creative way out of unemployment life!)

6) From: Coffeenut
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Luck - Luck -- Luck - and more Luck!
I haven't been interested in selling my coffee, but have had a couple of
requests from friends where they've taken some of my gift coffee to work and
shared it with their coworkers.  I'm always intrigued by those that take
home-roasting to a business level.  There's still lots of swill out there
and many a restaurant in my area could benefit from both a decent coffee and
brewing apparatus.  I guess it comes down to cost in those cases, but I've
had some great memories of a few restaurants that could also produce a great
cup of coffee.
Rick  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Lynne Biziewski
Sent: Saturday, January 13, 2007 7:04 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Modest Roaster Suggestions - For [Possible] Commercial
Endeavor
Thanks, Rick & Eddie. I completely forgot about the RK drum setup. It does
appeal to me. I'll check out the archives - along with figuring out which
coffees in my stash would be the best to roast & bring to the florist for
sampling. 
Wish me luck!
Lynne 
(trying to get a creative way out of unemployment life!)

7) From: jim gundlach
Lynne,
     For what you are looking at doing, I would suggest you take a  
close look at Ron Kyle's drum and BBQ set-up.  It can roast up to  
four pounds at a time.
       Pecan Jim
On Jan 13, 2007, at 5:28 PM, Lynne Biziewski wrote:
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8) From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Juan_M._J=E1come?=
I'm currently trying to start a small coffee business myself, and have had
great success with an old pressure cooker tuned into a whirly pop. It has
thick enough walls, so heat distributes evenly, nd with the appropiate
burner beneath, it can easily do up to 4 pounds. You do have to crank some,
but that can be worked out as well; and it is a veeeeery cost effective
solution.
Regards,
Juan M.
2007/1/14, jim gundlach :
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9) From: Lynne Biziewski
Juan -
I'm VERY interested in this - what do you use to crank? Are you using the
top of a Whirly-Pop?
Lynne
On 1/15/07, Juan M. Jácome  wrote:
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10) From: =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Juan_M._J=E1come?=
nope, I did a custom rod and stirrer, with a small aluminum fan attached, s=
o
the air circulates as I crank. I can email you some pics of my setup, I am
yet to perfect the timing and all, but have done a couple of very nice
batches already. I'll have the pics mailed to you tomorrow.
JM
2007/1/15, Lynne Biziewski :
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