HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Travel Grinder Recommendations (10 msgs / 220 lines)
1) From: Eddie Dove
Family,
Many of you sing the praises of the Baratza and Solis to the extent that I
am considering buying one for a backup / travel grinder.  Do you have other
recommendations for a travel grinder?  I cannot do the manual grinders ...
carpal tunnel.  I need to retire the Krups GVX1 as a travel grinder (abysmal
grinder) so all input and any other recommendations are welcome.  Budget
number is irrelevant ... I will save until I can pay cash.
Should I use regular rice or minute rice to clean this new grinder?
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

2) From: Jeremy DeFranco
I have no complaints about my SMP. Excellent for backup duty. If price is
not a border, go for Baratza Virtuoso, the next step up from SMP. When
cleaning the new grinder be sure to boil the rice first! ....
.....Just Kidding!
---Family,
Many of you sing the praises of the Baratza and Solis to the extent that I
am considering buying one for a backup / travel grinder.  Do you have other
recommendations for a travel grinder?  I cannot do the manual grinders ...
carpal tunnel.  I need to retire the Krups GVX1 as a travel grinder (abysmal
grinder) so all input and any other recommendations are welcome.  Budget
number is irrelevant ... I will save until I can pay cash.
Should I use regular rice or minute rice to clean this new grinder?
Eddie

3) From: Vicki Smith
I took my solis with me when I went on holiday disguised as an itinerant 
coffee roaster. Both machines mentioned are big enough that I would not 
want to have to carry them in my luggage if I had to wrangle it myself 
along with my other shtuff. I normally travel with the little whirly 
blade grinder SM sells, a small electric kettle and either my aeropress, 
or a pour over funnel.
vicki
Eddie Dove wrote:
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4) From: Eddie Dove
I don't know the difference between the Solis and the Virtuoso ... will the
Virtuoso suffice for vacation espresso duty?
On 1/13/07, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

5) From: raymanowen
Kyle Anderson sent me a pair of Virtuoso burrs for my SMP. Totally easy
swap, and the Virtuoso burrs are well made. They look like forgings rather
than the execrable job done on a dull gear cutter for the SMP's ring burr.
A plan view of the burrs in a grinder would look like two endless flat file=
s
facing each other. They're set at an angle and usually have a dual pitch.
Very coarse to break up the whole beans, followed by a finer pitch that wil=
l
determine the final particulate size by its proximity to the opposite
cutting surface.
I've never used the SMP/ Virtuoso to do an espresso grind, but the burrs
look totally capable.
If you have a SMP grinder, stick a set of Virtuoso burrs in it. As I say,
it's Child's Play and I think you will be pleased. The difference is $50
retail
(If you want to throw something at me- throw SNOW SHOVELS! I've broken two
in this white Scheiße! ) And the Gonifs are getting up to $40+ for new
cheapos.
The Solis or Virtuoso won't have 20 different settings in the espresso
range, but I doubt if you'd like to carry my coffee grinding Fire Hydrant
around unless you have a Radio Flyer wagon.
Help this hopes-
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?

6) From: Paul Carder
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Eddie, I use at home and for travel the conical burr ginder Barista from =
Starbucks. Fantastic machine for the price. Great grind control. I =
bought mine at a store on sale  . You can probably be a little patient =
and get an even better  deal on ebay. My Cusinart has been relegated to =
backup duty in case of catastrophy!
Paul Carder

7) From: Peter Zulkowski
My Mazzer Mini goes with us when we travel.
It is a Mini after all. The Major stays home!
On short trips I pre grind.
PeterZ
Eddie Dove wrote:
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8) From: Dave Ehrenkranz
We were in China from Dec 9 - Dec 29. I brought along beans I roasted  
for the trip planning to buy an (ugh) blade grinder and a french  
press. But alas couldn't find either in multiple stores and no body  
had any idea where I could find them. Finally we found a coffee house  
whose owner was very helpful. She contacted her supplier who sold us  
a small hand grinder and a small french press (Pearl Horse Coffee &  
Tea Maker).
The grinder grinds enough beans for 2 cups (one coffee mug) which is  
also the capacity of the press. We were very happy to have both and  
they not only allowed us to enjoy coffee while in China but also are  
great souvenirs which are being used at home. I have not used a Zass  
but I suspect our FJ-2 coffee mill is similar.
dave
On Jan 14, 2007, at 10:43 AM, Peter Zulkowski wrote:
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9) From: Justin Marquez
On 1/13/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>
Eddie -
Short answer - 50 bucks!  Longer answer follows below...
<Snip>
Here's the word from Kyle at Solis.  It seems there are some
significant changes.
Motor: The Virtuoso has a powerful DC motor that produces over 4 times
the output
of the Maestro AC motor. This new motor spins at less than 1/3 the speed of the
Maestro hence it is much quieter and the pitch of the sound is much
lower too. The
design of the new motor and its efficiency allows for long duty cycles (like 5
minutes continuous) The motor controls have a thermal safety device
which protects the motor from overheating and are automatically
resettable. The Maestro has a "one shot" fuse that must be replaced if
it trips either due to being jammed (by a rock or green bean) or just
from over use (more than about two minutes of
continuous grinding)
Burrs:  Manufactured in Italy, the Virtuoso's grinding burrs are of the same
material and durability as the industry's highest-quality line of commercial
conical burr coffee grinders. The cut on the burrs are also of a
different design
and tighter manufacturing tolerances than the Maestro burrs.
Burr support: The Maestro ring burr is supported on two points, This allows for
some "rocking" of the burr to occur. The Virtuoso is supported on
three points, as
as we know: "three points determine a plane". This provides a totally stable
platform for the new ring burr and produces a more consistent grind.
Burr Calibration System: As in all manufacturing, this grinder has many
components, each with its own manufacturing tolerance. Our experience with the
Maestro was that these tolerances could "stack up" and result in a grinder that
tended toward the fine range or the coarse range with no capability for us to
compensate for this. The Virtuoso has an innovative calibration system
that allows
all the manufacturing tolerances to be neutralized or eliminated in the final
assembly process, hence providing every grinder to be "zeroed out"
perfectly. This
feature adds cost to the product, but it allows us to produce grinders that are
all identical in their performance. We hope this consistency will earn Baratza a
reputation for unmatched quality for grinders in this category.
Top casting: This is primarily an aesthetic feature in response to many who have
asked for a metal housed grinder. The small bit of function this
provides over the
Maestro is additional weight for stability and additional sound/vibration
isolation (due to the additional mass and density of the metal
casting). (We think
it's a very nice visual enhancement, but then, we're a bit biased!)

10) From: Eddie Dove
Justin,
Excellent information!  Thank you very much!
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/15/07, Justin Marquez  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/15/07, Justin Marquez  wrote:
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