HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Blog-aasorted (9 msgs / 321 lines)
1) From: Bernard Gerrard
This list is amazing with some of the most amazing OT topics flogged.  
Cars! Pierogis! Orthodoxy!  Circumscion! To name a few.  Really 
entertaining and good natured.  My other specialty hobby list argues, 
flames and complains.  Good coffee must have some serious psychological 
value. Here are my questions and comments of the day.
1.  I am going to Nicaragua in March.  Any suggestions as where to buy 
green beans at point of origin?  This is a "souvenir" thing.  SM's 
really has everything one could want.
2.   Does the USDA have problems with a tourist bringing in green beans 
which could well be considered "plant seeds"?
Comments:  Basic home roasting is great, really easy and basically 
forgiving.  The SM sampler packets are wonderful.  Love the pierogi 
thread and ideas.  Mittel European food is so satisfying.
1.  Does anyone have a good piroshki recipe?  These Russian items are a 
yeast dough, bun like, often filled with a dill flavored meat filling.  
An Eastern Orthodox friend used to bring me some from their annual 
bazaar.  Delicious. 
2.  My Lubavich neighbors and I have great discussions on 
"orthodoxies"....note small o.  My "group", Episcopalian/Anglican,  has 
all sorts of degrees of orthodoxy and ritual.  Today the flavors have 
shifted more to doctrinal disputes.  We have much in common on the 
strictly non doctrinal side.  As has been pointed out, orthodoxy is 
often rather relative and indeed temporal,  boiling down to what your 
particular community or family observes.  As long as one does not forget 
the basic principles, these observances and rituals are part of our 
traditions and are worth our respect.  Isn't the Thanksgiving Dinner 
something that everyone has some sort of sacred family or regional 
customs surrounding it?  "Real" western Marylanders always have a dish 
of sauerkraut along side The Turkey.  I like properly prepared 
sauerkraut but the local custom is to dump out a can and heat it up.  
Yucky but Traditional.  Are not some of our roasting/brewing methods of 
the ritual and custom order?  And quite enjoyable too.  Think of the 
various schools of thought on these subjects.   Bernard

2) From: Eddie Dove
Bernard,
Great read.  You wrote, "Good coffee must have some serious psychological
value."  The University of Queensland did a study that concurs with you:
Caffeine, Cognition and Persuasion:  Evidence for Caffeine Increasing the
Systematic Processing of Persuasive Messages
I have the study in PDF format and it is a good read.
An in-law of mine just came back from a mission trip in Nicaragua and
brought me about 6 pounds of beans ... I'm not sure there is much of an
issue with it.
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/14/07, Bernard Gerrard  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/14/07, Bernard Gerrard  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Laura Micucci
...And we bring coffee (and vanilla) back from Haiti all the time...
Eddie Dove  wrote:   Bernard,
Great read.  You wrote, "Good coffee must have some serious psychological value."  The University of Queensland did a study that concurs with you:  
Caffeine, Cognition and Persuasion:  Evidence for Caffeine Increasing the Systematic Processing of Persuasive Messages 
I have the study in PDF format and it is a good read.
An in-law of mine just came back from a mission trip in Nicaragua and brought me about 6 pounds of beans ... I'm not sure there is much of an issue with it. 
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archives http://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
  On 1/14/07, Bernard Gerrard  wrote:   This list is amazing with some of the most amazing OT topics flogged.
Cars! Pierogis! Orthodoxy!  Circumscion! To name a few.  Really
entertaining and good natured.  My other specialty hobby list argues,
flames and complains.  Good coffee must have some serious psychological 
value. Here are my questions and comments of the day.
1.  I am going to Nicaragua in March.  Any suggestions as where to buy
green beans at point of origin?  This is a "souvenir" thing.  SM's
really has everything one could want. 
2.   Does the USDA have problems with a tourist bringing in green beans
which could well be considered "plant seeds"?
Comments:  Basic home roasting is great, really easy and basically
forgiving.  The SM sampler packets are wonderful.  Love the pierogi 
thread and ideas.  Mittel European food is so satisfying.
1.  Does anyone have a good piroshki recipe?  These Russian items are a
yeast dough, bun like, often filled with a dill flavored meat filling.
An Eastern Orthodox friend used to bring me some from their annual 
bazaar.  Delicious.
2.  My Lubavich neighbors and I have great discussions on
"orthodoxies"....note small o.  My "group", Episcopalian/Anglican,  has
all sorts of degrees of orthodoxy and ritual.  Today the flavors have 
shifted more to doctrinal disputes.  We have much in common on the
strictly non doctrinal side.  As has been pointed out, orthodoxy is
often rather relative and indeed temporal,  boiling down to what your
particular community or family observes.  As long as one does not forget 
the basic principles, these observances and rituals are part of our
traditions and are worth our respect.  Isn't the Thanksgiving Dinner
something that everyone has some sort of sacred family or regional
customs surrounding it?  "Real" western Marylanders always have a dish
of sauerkraut along side The Turkey.  I like properly prepared
sauerkraut but the local custom is to dump out a can and heat it up.
Yucky but Traditional.  Are not some of our roasting/brewing methods of
the ritual and custom order?  And quite enjoyable too.  Think of the
various schools of thought on these subjects.   BernardLaura
  Making the world a better place one bean at a time.
  www.freshroastedforyou.com

4) From: Jeff Bensen
At 09:41 AM 1/14/2007, Bernard Gerrard wrote:
<Snip>
Bernard -
My step-mother-in-law is from St. Petersburg, having only been in the 
states about a decade. She cooks us wonderful Russian meals whenever 
we visit. I just emailed her to see if she has a recipe that she is 
willing to share. I'll let you know what she says.
- Jeff Bensen
   Palm Bay, FL

5) From: Robert Joslin
Bernard
     Until last year I wouldn't have given a *tourist* very good odds on
obtaining quality greens.  My opinion changed somewhat after May when my
wife, returning from a medical mission to Guatemala, brought me 9 pounds of
beans.   I accepted with thanks, not expecting much, but they all turned out
to be excellent coffees.  From the roasting log I see one, a San Pedro
Volcan (from Atitlan area I believe) was just exceptional.  Carried 15
seconds into 2nd crack, it was as good as any coffee I have ever roasted.
So I suppose it is possible for someone other than a coffee buyer to get
lucky and occasionally grab some really good stuff.  I'm sure the odds go up
if you know someone with local connections.   (Try the U.S. Consulate in
Managua!? :-)
     I can't speak to the legality of the issue, but my wife and several
other members of her group brought back beans with no
problems.
                                               Josh
On 1/14/07, Bernard Gerrard  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Lynne Biziewski
Bernard -
Glad you like the fact that our OT subjects are as varied as SM's coffee
varieties!
Just want to mention that I met a neighbor in my new neighborhood who is
from Nicaragua. I will ask her the next time I see her if she has any
suggestions about buying green coffee beans there.
Lynne

7) From: Sandy Andina
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Oh, how I wish I did!  There used to be a cafe, in the Southcenter  
Mall outside Seattle (a smaller branch in Bellevue was not quite as  
good) called Olive's East. They sold coffees, teas and spices at the  
retail counter up front; but on the cafe menu, the piroshki were to  
die for.  I can still taste them (and the accompanying salad with  
parmesan dressing) 29 years later!  (And they poured a delectable and  
buttery-tangy house blend that was mostly Guatemalan and Costa Rican).
On Jan 14, 2007, at 8:41 AM, Bernard Gerrard wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-180--596359291
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Oh, how I wish I did!  There =
used to be a cafe, in the Southcenter Mall outside Seattle (a smaller =
branch in Bellevue was not quite as good) called Olive's East. They sold =
coffees, teas and spices at the retail counter up front; but on the cafe =
menu, the piroshki were to die for.  I can still taste them (and the =
accompanying salad with parmesan dressing) 29 years later!  (And they =
poured a delectable and buttery-tangy house blend that was mostly =
Guatemalan and Costa Rican).
On Jan 14, 2007, at 8:41 AM, =
Bernard Gerrard wrote:

1.  Does anyone have a good = piroshki recipe?  These = Russian items are a yeast dough, bun like, often filled with a dill = flavored meat filling.  = An Eastern Orthodox friend used to bring me some from their = annual bazaar.  = Delicious.

Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-180--596359291--

8) From: Ed Needham
Mmmmmm...you are about the only one getting coffee off the Haitian island 
these days!  Haiti is like a sister island to Jamaica (known for the 
fabulous Jamaica Blue Mountain coffee).  The general climate, soils type and 
altitude for growing coffee are almost exactly the same.  When I've had good 
Haitian coffee, it is as good or better than the Jamaica Blue Mountain beans 
I've had, but much cheaper since Haiti does not have the marketing machine 
that Jamaica has developed.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

9) From: Laura Micucci
Hi Ed, 
   
  Our church goes at least twice a year to Haiti. We sponsor a couple of orphanages there.  We always stop at a local farm and buy beans (Jacmel).  They know their coffee and how to brew and when to serve what kind of coffee there as well.  You will get different coffee in the morning than you will in the evening. In the morning they always serve coffee with a carafe of warm milk.
   
  I started getting into home roasting when I came back from Jacmel this past summer.  One interesting thing, we stopped at a small hotel restaraunt for breakfast and coffee on our way up the mountain to see the location of a new church.  the coffee they served was a brownish red color and sweet!  I was told by someone that they roast it in a cast iron skillet with brown sugar, yum! ahhh, now I want some!  Oh well perhaps this summer again...
Ed Needham  wrote:
  Mmmmmm...you are about the only one getting coffee off the Haitian island 
these days! Haiti is like a sister island to Jamaica (known for the 
fabulous Jamaica Blue Mountain coffee). The general climate, soils type and 
altitude for growing coffee are almost exactly the same. When I've had good 
Haitian coffee, it is as good or better than the Jamaica Blue Mountain beans 
I've had, but much cheaper since Haiti does not have the marketing machine 
that Jamaica has developed.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************


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