HomeRoast Digest


Topic: flavor question (14 msgs / 369 lines)
1) From: David F Iseminger
as I mentioned in my introduction last week I have been home roasting for
 a year  in a fresh roast plus 8 and recently got a Gaggia Coffee (Ebay,
great deal) but it is that and a french press.  I have a mr. coffee burr
grinder (I know, I am upgrading soon)  my question is regrarding taste
and flavor.  I would like to think I have a good palate, I am a former
chef and have been intrested in all things food for some time.  All of
the coffee I have purchased has flavor profiles listed under the name
(coffee, tobacco, floral, you know the drill) and I just don't get it.  I
know when it is good and I know when I have over roasted or  I don't care
for the bean, but as far as the sugessted tones or notes, I just don't
get it.  Am I the only one?  any suggestions?
thanks,
David
PS be gentle and remember I am new

2) From: Lynne
David -
I have often wondered about that myself. I started roasting last 
spring, and to this day, I read those descriptions ... tobacco, 
marmalade, wine, clove, malt... then I taste, and I think, "Hmm - 
coffee..."
I figure my palate may not be as refined, but I know what I like, and 
that's all that matters. I'm in sweet heaven every time I roast a batch 
that turns out good.
Lynne
On Jan 14, 2007, at 3:17 PM, David F Iseminger wrote:
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3) From: Eddie Dove
David,
If you can physically taste those things, then the grinder is going to make
a difference.  I never tasted those things until I got a decent grinder.
With my newest grinder, all of those flavors are clear as a bell.  My theory
is that when poorly ground, you have some many varying stages of extraction
(due to all the different sized particles in the grind) that the individual
flavors get muddied and / or lost.  In my home, this only matters to me
though because my wife simply cannot taste those flavors, but she will let
me know if the coffee is good.
Hope this helps ...
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/14/07, David F Iseminger  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/14/07, David F Iseminger  wrote:
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4) From: Brian Kamnetz
Eddie,
Please remind me of what grinder you are currently using....
Thanks,
Brian
On 1/14/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
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5) From: David F Iseminger
lynne,
glad to know I am not alone.  I am presently in love with the indian
monsooned malobar.  Like I said, I can tell when it is good and when it
is not.
david

6) From: Dave Ehrenkranz
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Brian,
I have a solis maestro classic and I am very pleased. I also often  
have a dificult time noticing all the flavors in the descriptions. I  
was amazed when I roasted the Misty Valley and was able to both smell  
and taste blueberry flavor.http://sweetmarias.com/coffee.africa.ethiopia.html#ididomistyvalleydave
On Jan 14, 2007, at 12:42 PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
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Brian,I have a solis =
maestro classic and I am very pleased. I also often have a dificult time =
noticing all the flavors in the descriptions. I was amazed when I =
roasted the Misty Valley and was able to both smell and taste blueberry =
flavor.On Jan 14, 2007, at 12:42 =">http://sweetmarias.com/coffee.africa.ethiopia.html#ididomistyvalley=dave
On Jan 14, 2007, at 12:42 = PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
Eddie, = Please remind me of what grinder you are currently = using.... Thanks, Brian On 1/14/07, Eddie = Dove < = southcoastcoffeeroaster> wrote:David, If = you can physically taste those things, then the grinder is going to make = a difference.  I never tasted those things until I got a decent = grinder.  With my newest grinder, all of those flavors are clear as a = bell.  My theory is that when poorly ground, you have some many = varying stages of extraction (due to all the different sized particles = in the grind) that the individual flavors get muddied and / or lost.  = In my home, this only matters to me though because my wife simply cannot = taste those flavors, but she will let me know if the coffee is good.  = Hope this helps ... Eddie -- My = Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafe =http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/ Sweet Maria's List = - Searchable Archives http://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/= On = 1/14/07, David F Iseminger < = isemingerfamily> wrote: as I mentioned in = my introduction last week I have been home roasting for a year  in= a fresh roast plus 8 and recently got a Gaggia Coffee (Ebay, great = deal) but it is that and a french press.  I have a mr. coffee burr = grinder (I know, I am upgrading soon)  my question is regrarding = taste and flavor.  I would like to think I have a good palate, I = am a former chef and have been intrested in all things food for some = time.  All of the coffee I have purchased has flavor profiles = listed under the name (coffee, tobacco, floral, you know the drill) = and I just don't get it.  I know when it is good and I know when = I have over roasted or  I don't care for the bean, but as far as = the sugessted tones or notes, I just don't get it.  Am I the only = one?  any suggestions? thanks, David PS be gentle = and remember I am new = homeroast mailing list http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailma=n/listinfo/homeroast To change your personal list settings = (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo=.html#personalsettings = = --Apple-Mail-16--624903207--

7) From: Laura Micucci
sometimes if I read the discription after I taste the coffee I get that "oh yeah I taste that" 
Lynne  wrote:  David -
I have often wondered about that myself. I started roasting last 
spring, and to this day, I read those descriptions ... tobacco, 
marmalade, wine, clove, malt... then I taste, and I think, "Hmm - 
coffee..."
I figure my palate may not be as refined, but I know what I like, and 
that's all that matters. I'm in sweet heaven every time I roast a batch 
that turns out good.
Lynne
On Jan 14, 2007, at 3:17 PM, David F Iseminger wrote:
<Snip>Laura
  Making the world a better place one bean at a time.
  www.freshroastedforyou.com

8) From: Lynne Biziewski
Just roasted some Brazil Yellow Bourbon and some Papa New Guinea the other
day. I am in love with both of them.
I find that as long as I don't mess up the roasting (usually by roasting a
bit too long for my preferences), I'm in love with whatever SM bean I am
drinking. And also with that heavenly scent every time I open the cabinet...
Lynne
On 1/14/07, David F Iseminger  wrote:
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9) From: Eddie Dove
Brian,
I just got a Mazzer Mini around Thanksgiving.  Before that, I was using a
KitchenAid Pro Line that I really liked and it really woke me up to what
flavors could be in coffee.  I was going to keep it, but someone made me an
offer I couldn't refuse, which is why I am looking for another grinder as a
backup.  The KitchenAid Pro Line would not make a good travel grinder unless
you want to pack it into the original box and styrofoam every time.
By the way ... "when you are shipping styrofoam to someone, what do you pack
it in?"
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/14/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/14/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Brian Kamnetz
Eddie,
That's an interesting endorsement of the Mazzer Mini over the KitchenAid
Pro: "With my newest grinder, all of those flavors are clear as a bell."
Seems to validate the commonly-repeated assertions regarding Mazzer
grinders.
Brian
On 1/14/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
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11) From: Fancye9876
I am in the same boat, can't taste all those flavors.  The only thing  I can 
taste is a blueberry and sometimes I think I get a floral flavor but that  is 
about it. Got some Misty Valley ordered and it should be here tomorrow. I am  
looking forward to finding the blueberry in it.
 
Susan

12) From: Coffeenut
David,
I'd love to be able to determine all the flavors that Tom associates with
his coffee cupping reports.  I have a good grinder (Rocky DL), espresso
machine (Isomac), Technivorm brewer, etc, etc, but apparently didn't order
that "palate upgrade surgery".  I can distinguish certain flavors like
chocolate, tobacco, leather and some floral notes, but nowhere near what Tom
can pull out of a cupping.  
I do have a lot of fun (enjoyment) from the aromas though of drip coffee.
If you get your snout over the grind in a good drip brewer's basket just as
the top surface of the grinds becomes wet and puffy, there are some real
nasal delights there that can also be quite different between bean
varieties.  I guess there's not much call for "nasal cupping" results, but
there's a lot of unique and wonderful odors in the brew basket for those
first couple of minutes.  I first noticed this back when I was using a
Melitta Pour-over method for making drip each day.  I had that big #6
basket, was pouring 200F water through it and you couldn't miss the great
aromas coming up in the first saturation of the grinds.
Rick

13) From: Frank Parth
<Snip>
David,
The listees recently had a discussion on supertasters vs normal tasters. One characteristic of supertasters is thattheyoften dislike coffee.
If you were a chef you are likely a supertaster (they make the best cooks). The bottom line is to do whatever tastes good to you (and report back to us).
Frank Parth

14) From: stereoplegic
ok guys and gals, i'm in the same boat at times. tom's descriptions 
definitely help me figure out what i'm tasting.
sometimes, though, i'm lost. i've heard that it can take around 2 years 
to train your palate to notice particular coffee flavors, so don't be 
discouraged.
one thing that can help is taking a nice, long whiff (cuppers do this 
first, half of taste is smell). cover your nose with your hand (obviosly 
your hand should be clean, washing w/ unscented soap helps) and stick 
your nose as far in the cup as you can.
dave mentioned the ethiopia idido misty valley dp (i'm still waiting for 
harvey to bring mine) as easy to recognize. ethiopians (w/ the possible 
exception of harrar, which isn't available right now anyway, it can be 
kinda hit or miss) are usually pretty easy to recognize for their floral 
and citrus notes. i think its listed on the site as late harvest 
yirgacheffe (oh, how i love my yirgs), but i received ethiopia 
yirgacheffe moledina 3993: in both batches i roasted the floral and 
tangerine jumped out at me. by tom's description on the website, the 
late harvest yirg sounds like the same or at least a very similar 
coffee. try that one.
lauramicucci wrote:
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