HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Coffee roasted with Sugar? (11 msgs / 218 lines)
1) From: Lauren Good
On Jan 15, 2007, at 10:34 PM, Laura Micucci wrote:
<Snip>
My brother recently returned from the San Pedra Sula region of  
Honduras and talked about the coffee that was roasted with sugar. He  
raved about how good it was. Unfortunately what he brought back was  
pre-ground, and although vacuum sealed was not very appealing. I  
tried it in the Sylvia, drip and the AP, none of which were very  
good. In this one the burnt sugar taste overwhelmed the coffee. The  
brother is a physician, and goes to volunteer at a clinic once a  
year, so perhaps I'll go along next time and do the coffee research.
Lauren

2) From: Brett Mason
After Folgers, people will try anything....
 Sweet Marias, For Life!
On 1/16/07, Lauren Good  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

3) From: Peregrine38
We bought some coffee in Roatan, Bay Islands, Honduras which was  
roasted with shredded sugar cane.  We found it novel, but not to our  
taste.  The Bay Islands are worth a visit.
Roger
On Jan 16, 2007, at 6:44 PM, Lauren Good wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Laura Micucci
Lauren,
   
  Great idea.  Please let us know how the research goes.  
   
  Has anyone else heard or tried roasting coffee with sugar?  Curious...
Lauren Good  wrote:
  
On Jan 15, 2007, at 10:34 PM, Laura Micucci wrote:
<Snip>
My brother recently returned from the San Pedra Sula region of 
Honduras and talked about the coffee that was roasted with sugar. He 
raved about how good it was. Unfortunately what he brought back was 
pre-ground, and although vacuum sealed was not very appealing. I 
tried it in the Sylvia, drip and the AP, none of which were very 
good. In this one the burnt sugar taste overwhelmed the coffee. The 
brother is a physician, and goes to volunteer at a clinic once a 
year, so perhaps I'll go along next time and do the coffee research.
LaurenLaura
  Making the world a better place one bean at a time.
  www.freshroastedforyou.com

5) From: Ed Needham
I read somewhere that beans were sugar coated near the end of a roast as a 
way of 'sealing' them to extend freshness for long trips.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

6) From: Robert Joslin
Mark Pendergast in his book *Uncommpon Grounds* says that one of the very
popular coffees sold in US in late 19 and early 20th century was a sugar
glazed coffee sold under ARBUCKLE brand.  This " extended freshness"
claim was the sales pitch John Arbuckle used.
On 1/16/07, Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Jared Andersson
This sounds like something I would like to try but feel a bit afraid of
putting sugar coated beans in my grinder.  Has anyone ground this kind of
coffee?  If it is popular in Spain and in the past it must be a problem.
Jared
On 1/17/07, Robert Joslin  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: miKe mcKoffee
I'd imagine completely sealing roasted beans in a film of sugar to "extend
freshness" not just a sales pitch but actually effective. I've munched
couple year old chocolate covered coffee beans and the beans sealed in
chocolate do not have the readily tasteable staleness one would expect. 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Robert Joslin
	Sent: Wednesday, January 17, 2007 6:05 AM
	
	Mark Pendergast in his book Uncommpon Grounds says that one of the
very popular coffees sold in US in late 19 and early 20th century was a
sugar glazed coffee sold under ARBUCKLE brand.  This " extended freshness"
claim was the sales pitch John Arbuckle used. 
	
	On 1/16/07, Ed Needham  wrote: 
		I read somewhere that beans were sugar coated near the end
of a roast as a
		way of 'sealing' them to extend freshness for long trips. 
		*********************
		Ed NeedhamR
		"to absurdity and beyond!"
	http://www.homeroaster.com		(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM
filters)
		*********************

9) From: Robert Joslin
Sounds reasonable enough to me, Mike, however sugar could also help to mask
the flavor of some not-so-good quality beans, a point implied but not stated
by Pendergast.  Not to bore anyone, but if I may quote just once  from this
book, "Arbuckle also applied an egg-and-sugar glaze, purportedly to prevent
his roasted beans from staling and to help in 'clarifying' the coffee." The
brand name was Ariosa...and the man was attempting to become the John D.
Rockefeller of the coffee trade.
On 1/17/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Ed Needham
THAT'S where I read it.  I think the sugar can be added as the beans come 
out of the roaster.  At a finished roast bean temp of around 450F degrees, 
I'm pretty sure the sugar would melt quickly and coat the beans.  I may try 
it.  I usually drink coffee black, but occasionally (usually when I've 
already had too much coffee) I like it with a little sugar and occasionally 
cream.
Thanks
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

11) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
Very interesting... I to enjoy choclate covered coffee beans and you are
correct I haven't noted extreme staleness either... Things that make you
go HMMMMMMMmmmm......
Dennis
I'd imagine completely sealing roasted beans in a film of sugar to
"extend freshness" not just a sales pitch but actually effective. I've
munched couple year old chocolate covered coffee beans and the beans
sealed in chocolate do not have the readily tasteable staleness one
would expect. 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I
must first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal
enlightenment found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who
have gone before.
_


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