HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Learning about resting! (16 msgs / 329 lines)
1) From: Silvia Marsh
The longest I'd let a fresh-roasted coffee rest was a whopping twelve
hours...but the other day I decided to try not only a rest period but the
plastic vented bags I picked up with the coffee. I roasted some of the Costa
Rican Peaberry to a City (or at least close, to my untrained eye) and
roasted two batches of the Congo Kivu Peaberry to a Full City.  I took the
Costa Rican and one batch of the Congo and put them in their separate little
vented bags, then ground the other batch of the Congo and put it in a third
bag.  That was Sunday. I'd tried the Congo that morning and wasn't as
impressed as I was with the Costa Rican.
Today, just now, I had the ground Congo batch...and I get it now. ;)  It's
richer than the fresh batch, and a bit mellower. It's got a little bit of
the citrus tang I got off of the Costa Rican variety, but only at the
finish...I like it very much.
This adds a whole new dimension to things!!  I'm so hooked it's pathetic. :)
Silvia

2) From: Eddie Dove
Silvia,
It gets even better ... let the coffee rest in whole bean form ... there's
lots of things going on in there that is better if it is still whole and it
also helps fend off staling.  Then after a few days of rest in your valve
bags (good idea and reusable), grind it right before you brew it.  This will
take you to the next dimension!
I am so glad you are enjoying this just like the rest of us!  Please keep us
posted and let us know if we can help you with anything at all.
Welcome again.
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/16/07, Silvia Marsh  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/16/07, Silvia Marsh  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: miKe mcKoffee
Silvia,
Are you saying you pre-ground the coffee Sunday to "rest" until today,
Tuesday? Just so we're clear when people are referring to "resting" a roast
it's in whole bean form, then grinding just before brewing! (regardless the
brewing method) With only two days pre-ground directly from roasting in a
valve bag probably still fairly decent and not toooo stale, but I challenge
you to roast some more of the same greens, rest in whole bean form for 4
days in a valve bag, then grind and immediately brew. Me thinks you'll be
even more pleasantly surprised!
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Silvia Marsh
	Sent: Tuesday, January 16, 2007 7:31 PM
	
	The longest I'd let a fresh-roasted coffee rest was a whopping
twelve hours...but the other day I decided to try not only a rest period but
the plastic vented bags I picked up with the coffee. I roasted some of the
Costa Rican Peaberry to a City (or at least close, to my untrained eye) and
roasted two batches of the Congo Kivu Peaberry to a Full City.  I took the
Costa Rican and one batch of the Congo and put them in their separate little
vented bags, then ground the other batch of the Congo and put it in a third
bag.  That was Sunday. I'd tried the Congo that morning and wasn't as
impressed as I was with the Costa Rican. 
	
	Today, just now, I had the ground Congo batch...and I get it now. ;)
It's richer than the fresh batch, and a bit mellower. It's got a little bit
of the citrus tang I got off of the Costa Rican variety, but only at the
finish...I like it very much. 
	
	This adds a whole new dimension to things!!  I'm so hooked it's
pathetic. :)
	
	Silvia

4) From: Silvia Marsh
It was a bit of an experiment...I tend to do a lot of that. Sometimes it
works, sometimes it doesn't. ;)
I'll take your challenge; I also vent-bagged a whole-bean batch that day.
I'll grind and brew Thursday and let you know how it is.
On 1/16/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
From Eddie:
"It gets even better ... let the coffee rest in whole bean form ... there's
lots of things going on in there that is better if it is still whole and it
also helps fend off staling.  Then after a few days of rest in your valve
bags (good idea and reusable), grind it right before you brew it.  This will
take you to the next dimension!"
I was actually wondering how feasible it was to reuse the valve bags...you
answered my question before I could ask it. ;) Thanks.

5) From: James
Welcome to the list Silvia! Always room for one more.
  
Resting makes =
a big difference here. I am still trying to isolate why my roasts seem to t=
ake longer to achieve full flavor. I am beginning to narrow it down to humi=
dity and whether the container is sealed approximately 1-2 hours after roas=
ting or waiting overnight before sealing the storage container.
  
Am a=
bout to try my first Yirg and can barely contain the excitement!
  
Jam=
es in Southern CA.
----- Original Message ----
From: Silvia Marsh 
To: homeroast
Sent: Tuesday, J=
anuary 16, 2007 7:31:18 PM
Subject: +Learning about resting!
The lon=
gest I'd let a fresh-roasted coffee rest was a whopping twelve hours...but =
the other day I decided to try not only a rest period but the plastic vente=
d bags I picked up with the coffee. I roasted some of the Costa Rican Peabe=
rry to a City (or at least close, to my untrained eye) and  roasted two bat=
ches of the Congo Kivu Peaberry to a Full City.  I took the Costa Rican and=
 one batch of the Congo and put them in their separate little vented bags, =
then ground the other batch of the Congo and put it in a third bag.  That w=
as Sunday. I'd tried the Congo that morning and wasn't as impressed as I wa=
s with the Costa Rican.
Today, just now, I had the ground Congo bat=
ch...and I get it now. ;)  It's richer than the fresh batch, and a bit mell=
ower. It's got a little bit of the citrus tang I got off of the Costa Rican=
 variety, but only at the finish...I like it very much.
This adds a=
 whole new dimension to things!!  I'm so hooked it's pathetic. :)
Silv=
ia=
Food fight? Enjoy some healthy de=
bate 
in the Yahoo! Answers Food & Drink Q&A.http://answers.yahoo.com/=dir/?link=list&sid=396545367

6) From: Silvia Marsh
I'm roasting with the Freshroast Plus, and the batches in that are a
whopping 1/2 cup.  I'm gonna have to start on a roasting cycle, it seems.
*grins*
On 1/17/07, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Ronnie Kramer
As far as resting in the valve bags; I've heard that I should rest my beans 4 to 24 hours unsealed.  Is this just for canisters?  If using the valve bags do you seal them right away or do you leave them open for 1/2 a day or so before closing the bag?
   
Eddie Dove  wrote:
  Silvia,
It gets even better ... let the coffee rest in whole bean form ... there's lots of things going on in there that is better if it is still whole and it also helps fend off staling.  Then after a few days of rest in your valve bags (good idea and reusable), grind it right before you brew it.  This will take you to the next dimension! 
I am so glad you are enjoying this just like the rest of us!  Please keep us posted and let us know if we can help you with anything at all.
Welcome again.
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafe http://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
  On 1/16/07, Silvia Marsh  wrote:  The longest I'd let a fresh-roasted coffee rest was a whopping twelve hours...but the other day I decided to try not only a rest period but the plastic vented bags I picked up with the coffee. I roasted some of the Costa Rican Peaberry to a City (or at least close, to my untrained eye) and  roasted two batches of the Congo Kivu Peaberry to a Full City.  I took the Costa Rican and one batch of the Congo and put them in their separate little vented bags, then ground the other batch of the Congo and put it in a third bag.  That was Sunday. I'd tried the Congo that morning and wasn't as impressed as I was with the Costa Rican. 
Today, just now, I had the ground Congo batch...and I get it now. ;)  It's richer than the fresh batch, and a bit mellower. It's got a little bit of the citrus tang I got off of the Costa Rican variety, but only at the finish...I like it very much. 
This adds a whole new dimension to things!!  I'm so hooked it's pathetic. :)
Silvia
Ronnie Kramer
Austin, TX

8) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I routenly make coffee for a week at a time and depending on the coffee
WOW flavor explosion! For some coffees it is 2 days (Bugisu at 20 hours
is my shortest rester) some coffees don't truly find the "Sweet Spot"
until almost 4-5 days after roasting.  How are you roasting and how
large are your batches? 
I recommond that you try to "get ahead of your coffee" where you are
roasting your planned usage 2-3 days ahead of time before you run out
that way all your coffees get the rest they need to show you their True
Colors and you arn't tempted to preempt the rest due to desperation..
 
of course this is simply my opinion...
Dennis 
AKA 
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True 
Safety Dept 
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) 
FPO AE 09532-2830 
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the southern hemisphere 
 "On station and on point 107 and counting down..."

9) From: Lynne
Silvia -
I like that! Best way to learn.
Welcome to the fold, by the way. The fun has only started...
Lynne
On Jan 16, 2007, at 11:11 PM, Silvia Marsh wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Silvia Marsh
I seal them right away. From what I read (and please correct me if I have
this wrong), the coffee is going to produce CO2, and that pushes the oxygen
out of the valve, kind of creating a good environment for preserving the
coffee without a lot of bells and whistles.
*grin* Plus, you can smell the coffee through the valve without opening it.
I think I like roasting coffee just so I can smell it anytime I want. Coffee
smell makes me happy.
On 1/17/07, Ronnie Kramer  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Brett Mason
Probably repetitive, but here's some guidelines:
Green Coffee - best within 1 year - try to keep in cool dry place (cool
being above 40, below 75)
Roasted Whole Bean - best within 2 weeks, optimal 3-6 days - try to keep
away from oxygen and moisture
Ground Coffee - best within 15 minutes, and we'll all tell you 1-2 minutes
is optimal.
Welcome,
Brett
On 1/17/07, Silvia Marsh  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

12) From: Silvia Marsh
Nothing wrong with repetition...I'd rather hear something I need to hear
many times rather than not at all.
On 1/17/07, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Ronnie Kramer
Happy is Good!
Silvia Marsh  wrote:  I seal them right away. From what I read (and please correct me if I have this wrong), the coffee is going to produce CO2, and that pushes the oxygen out of the valve, kind of creating a good environment for preserving the coffee without a lot of bells and whistles.  
*grin* Plus, you can smell the coffee through the valve without opening it. I think I like roasting coffee just so I can smell it anytime I want. Coffee smell makes me happy.
  On 1/17/07, Ronnie Kramer  wrote:    As far as resting in the valve bags; I've heard that I should rest my beans 4 to 24 hours unsealed.  Is this just for canisters?  If using the valve bags do you seal them right away or do you leave them open for 1/2 a day or so before closing the bag? 
     
Ronnie Kramer
Austin, TX

14) From: Jared Andersson
I would only add to Brett's post that light should be avoided for green and
roasted beans.  My mantra is "cool, dry, dark."  Jared
On 1/17/07, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Ken Mary
Read my comments in the effects of light on coffee thread. However, the 
shipboard environment may be humid, and water vapor is supposed to be much
more damaging to coffee than oxygen. It may also interest you that I tested
coffee stored in a jar with liquid water not touching the coffee. These were
overnight and 24 hour tests and there was no harm done to the coffee.
--
----------
<Snip>
<Snip>
her what she's won
<Snip>

16) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
That is what I understand as well, I belive that you are correct.. Rod
tell her what she's won
Dennis
 
 
 I  seal them right away. From what I read (and please correct me if I
have this wrong), the coffee is going to produce CO2, and that pushes
the oxygen out of the valve, kind of creating a good environment for
preserving the coffee without a lot of bells and whistles.  


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