HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Coffee taste and medications (12 msgs / 510 lines)
1) From: Ken Mary
One of the greatest misfortunes of my recent heart attack and open heart 
surgery is the effect of medications on coffee taste. I am down to one med
now, an antiarrythmia drug, amiodarone. This drug has ruined the taste of
some of my favorite foods, the effect is a huge increase in sweet and salty
perception. I cannot drink skim milk, for some reason it tastes nauseatingly
sweet. So I am drinking 2% against my doctor'e advice. My favorite rye bread
is nearly tasteless but hugely salty. But luckily, fruit and vegetables
taste great.
A few weeks ago I tried some decafs, they tasted absolutely awful, in no way
even resembling coffee. I trashed 6 roasts, being unable to finish a cup of
any even for scientific curiosity. In the hospital, before starting the
amiodarone, the decaf probably canned preground tasted good.
I had been drinking caffeinated tea with no bp or heart rate changes so I
felt safe in trying some caffeinated coffee. The effect on tea taste is
similar, what was once a fragrant and flavorful large leaf Yunnan tastes
like grocery store teabags.
The first caf roast was a Kenya for which I had developed a good profile.
The Kenya was somewhat acceptable but disappointing, and was trashed after a
few cups.
Some new Brazil Santos arrived in early December. This would be my first
Santos roast, having always bought either a Cerrado or Monte Carmelo, and a
good test of my Brazil profile that I bragged about in a few recent threads.
After one day rest, the taste was acceptable, I finished the cup. After 2
days rest this morning, the taste is magnificent, chocolatey, but missing a
little brightness due to a slower (10C vs 12C) ramp in passing through
first. I brew in a microwave and the vented air smelled like I was making
hot chocolate. This roast was so good that it overpowered the drug effects.
Sorry to be preaching again, but all of you should get a complete blood
lipid profile and homocysteine level ASAP. BTW, high homocysteine will also
ruin your eyesight, especially if you are diabetic. Do not learn the hard
way like me and suffer a heart attack. My HDL was just a little low, and LDL
a little high. But that may be all it takes over many years to develop heart
disease. My first warning that something was wrong was the heart attack.
I just recently found that VAT, visceral adipose tissue, or belly fat is
another predictor of heart disease. Although my body fat index is in the
middle of the good range, I had some excess belly fat. If you can pinch more
than an inch, you are in trouble. I should have known, but I was so healthy
I thought I was invincible.
--

2) From: David F Iseminger
Ken,
sorry to hear about your issues but glad to hear you have some coffee
that tastes good to you now.  How do you brew in a microwave?

3) From: Dan Bollinger
Ken,  I find that when I take higher doses of mineral supplements it can 
interfere with my tasting ability, too.
I heard about the 'belly fat' issue, too. There was a show on television about 
it.  They said that if you girth, measured at your belly button, was more than 
half your height you were in the risk zone.  I am now working to loose 3 inches!
Dan

4) From: Sheila Quinn
Hi Ken,
That's what most of us tend to think until something big happens like 
this! You are right that we should pay more attention.
I understand about the medications. If I take an AmbienCR and then try 
to have a bedtime snack or decaf coffee - anything at all - it tastes 
AWFUL. They should use something like this for a diet drug - if they 
could do it w/o making you sleepy, of course. Nobody would ever want to 
eat... LOL!
I wish you well, Ken, and I hope you continue on your way to healing.
Sheila
Ken Mary wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Ken Mary
Hah, my girth is (was) 34 inches, and I am 6 feet tall. Can you pinch an 
inch?
--
----------
<Snip>
<Snip>
inches!
<Snip>

6) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
Please, please, please DO NOT take ambien or similar sleep aids. You could
be sleepwalking or sleep DRIVING and be totally unaware of what you are
doing. Look for unexplained odometer mileage.
Try melatonin, start with .3 mg and increase by that amount nightly up to 5
mg or until you can sleep. Melatonin may act in reverse with some people and
have a stimulant effect, zero sleep.
A tryptophan metabolite called 5 hydroxy tryptophan or 5 htp is available
otc. This may work but I have no experience with it.
Make sure you take 400 to 500mg of magnesium with your evening dose of
calcium.
If nothing works then read a book or watch tv until you fall asleep.
--

7) From: Sheila Quinn
Thanks, but Melatonin makes me seriously ill - I'm not kidding! I can't 
take it. And no, I don't sleepwalk or sleepdrive on this. I've seen the 
news reports on that and it doesn't apply to me. Once I'm out, I'm out! 
I've tried everything else and Ambien is the ONLY thing that works to 
help me sleep - and sleep well w/o feeling groggy in the morning. 
Obviously, I wouldn't recommend it for everyone; in fact, I would urge 
others to try everything else first. It's VERY strong and should only be 
used as a last resort IMO. (It has other strange side effects, too. I 
won't go into it here.)
Reading, watching tv, etc... none of that (or anything else) works for 
me. Trust me, I've tried it all. Before I started taking it, there were 
times I was up for several days in a row with absolutely no sleep. So 
thanks, but I'll keep taking it.
Sheila
Ken Mary wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-4--289175254
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
The belly fat in question is actually an organ called the omentum.  
Ideally, it is supposed to hang in front of your abdominal organs  
like a limp curtain. Its fat is supposed to be available to the liver  
to convert to glycogen, but if you can't burn more than you take in,  
it is like a sponge for fat. It also causes increases in the stress  
hormone cortisol when you are under chronic stress, which makes you  
hungry and causes the omentum to increase in size. (That's the  
scientific argument behind all those anti-cortisol diet-pill  
commercials you see on TV--the science behind the weight gain is  
sound, but the compounds in the pills--if they are there in the  
amounts claimed--have not been scientifically proven to reduce  
cortisol; and conventional medical science has yet to find the magic  
bullet to do that either).  Cortisol increases blood pressure and  
insulin release even as it reduces your sensitivity to insulin, so  
your blood sugar goes up and you become even fatter. (I speak from  
bitter experience). It's bad news for your heart, pancreas, liver,  
and kidneys--and for fertile-age women, your uterus and ovaries since  
it can even make and secrete its own estrogen and set you up for  
excessive bleeding and cramping.
But if you can't "pinch more than an inch," don't feel smug.  The  
omentum lies beneath the abdominal muscles which lie beneath the  
skin. If you have a lot of omental fat but not a lot of subcutaneous  
fat, and your abs are nice and toned, you can still be in danger.    
Only way to get rid of the omental fat is to increase the calories  
you burn (reducing the calories you ingest may not in and of itself  
do the trick, since all calories are not metabolized equally--a  
food's "calories" are a measure of its potential as body fuel, based  
on the amount of fuel required, when burned, to raise the temperature  
of a given amount of water by a given amount. The kicker is how those  
fuels are burned and in what order the body chooses to burn them; it  
is more reliable to control the furnace than to control what goes  
into it, though you still need to do both).
On Jan 18, 2007, at 10:02 AM, Dan Bollinger wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-4--289175254
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
The belly fat in question is =
actually an organ called the omentum. Ideally, it is supposed to hang in =
front of your abdominal organs like a limp curtain. Its fat is supposed =
to be available to the liver to convert to glycogen, but if you can't =
burn more than you take in, it is like a sponge for fat. It also causes =
increases in the stress hormone cortisol when you are under chronic =
stress, which makes you hungry and causes the omentum to increase in =
size. (That's the scientific argument behind all those anti-cortisol =
diet-pill commercials you see on TV--the science behind the weight gain =
is sound, but the compounds in the pills--if they are there in the =
amounts claimed--have not been scientifically proven to reduce cortisol; =
and conventional medical science has yet to find the magic bullet to do =
that either).  Cortisol increases blood pressure and insulin release =
even as it reduces your sensitivity to insulin, so your blood sugar goes =
up and you become even fatter. (I speak from bitter experience). It's =
bad news for your heart, pancreas, liver, and kidneys--and for =
fertile-age women, your uterus and ovaries since it can even make and =
secrete its own estrogen and set you up for excessive bleeding and =
cramping.
But if = you can't "pinch more than an inch," don't feel smug.  The omentum = lies beneath the abdominal muscles which lie beneath the skin. If you = have a lot of omental fat but not a lot of subcutaneous fat, and your = abs are nice and toned, you can still be in danger.   Only way to = get rid of the omental fat is to increase the calories you burn = (reducing the calories you ingest may not in and of itself do the trick, = since all calories are not metabolized equally--a food's "calories" are = a measure of its potential as body fuel, based on the amount of fuel = required, when burned, to raise the temperature of a given amount of = water by a given amount. The kicker is how those fuels are burned and in = what order the body chooses to burn them; it is more reliable to control = the furnace than to control what goes into it, though you still need to = do both). On Jan 18, 2007, at 10:02 AM, Dan Bollinger = wrote:

I heard = about the 'belly fat' issue, too. There was a show on television about = it.  They said that if = you girth, measured at your belly button, was more than half your height = you were in the risk zone.  = I am now working to loose 3 inches!

= Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-4--289175254--

9) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-5--288718457
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
I find that valerian root drops me like a plugged buffalo--only  
problem is that it smells like feet after a marathon.  As to Ambien,  
my son had trouble sleeping once, so my husband prescribed it--and my  
son developed a rash and fever remarkably similar to the one I got  
when I discovered I was allergic to sulfa.  A decaf cappa, sipped  
slowly, also can be relaxing--there must be tryptophan in the warmed  
milk, not to mention the aforementioned calcium and magnesium.
On Jan 18, 2007, at 11:53 AM, Ken Mary wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-5--288718457
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
I find that valerian root drops =
me like a plugged buffalo--only problem is that it smells like feet =
after a marathon.  As to Ambien, my son had trouble sleeping once, so =
my husband prescribed it--and my son developed a rash and fever =
remarkably similar to the one I got when I discovered I was allergic to =
sulfa.  A decaf cappa, sipped slowly, also can be relaxing--there must =
be tryptophan in the warmed milk, not to mention the aforementioned =
calcium and magnesium. 
On Jan 18, 2007, at 11:53 AM, Ken =
Mary wrote:
From: Sheila = QuinnI understand about the = medications. If I take an AmbienCR and then tryto have a bedtime snack or decaf coffee - anything = at all - it tastesAWFUL. = Please, please, please DO NOT take ambien or similar = sleep aids. You couldbe sleepwalking or sleep = DRIVING and be totally unaware of what you aredoing. Look for unexplained odometer = mileage. Try melatonin, start with .3 mg and increase by that = amount nightly up to 5mg or until you can sleep. = Melatonin may act in reverse with some people andhave a stimulant effect, zero sleep. A = tryptophan metabolite called 5 hydroxy tryptophan or 5 htp is = availableotc. This may work but I have no = experience with it.Make sure you take 400 to 500mg = of magnesium with your evening dose of If nothing works then read a book or watch tv until = you fall asleep.-- homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-5--288718457--

10) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-6--288519802
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
Do you also make sure that you do NOTHING in your bedroom but sleep  
and do the horizontal bop?  If you multitask in your bedroom,  
especially your bed, you run the risk of associating it with the  
activities that keep your brain occupied and thus contribute to  
stress.  (Hard to follow this advice if you live in a studio or  
efficiency apt., I know).
On Jan 18, 2007, at 12:08 PM, Sheila Quinn wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-6--288519802
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Do you also make sure that you =
do NOTHING in your bedroom but sleep and do the horizontal bop?  If =
you multitask in your bedroom, especially your bed, you run the risk of =
associating it with the activities that keep your brain occupied and =
thus contribute to stress.  (Hard to follow this advice if you live in =
a studio or efficiency apt., I know).
On Jan 18, 2007, at =
12:08 PM, Sheila Quinn wrote:
Thanks, but Melatonin makes me seriously ill - I'm = not kidding! I can't take it. And no, I don't sleepwalk or sleepdrive on = this. I've seen the news reports on that and it doesn't apply to me. = Once I'm out, I'm out! I've tried everything else and Ambien is the ONLY = thing that works to help me sleep - and sleep well w/o feeling groggy in = the morning. Obviously, I wouldn't recommend it for everyone; in fact, I = would urge others to try everything else first. It's VERY strong and = should only be used as a last resort IMO. (It has other strange side = effects, too. I won't go into it here.) Reading, = watching tv, etc... none of that (or anything else) works for me. Trust = me, I've tried it all. Before I started taking it, there were times I = was up for several days in a row with absolutely no sleep. So thanks, = but I'll keep taking it.Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-6--288519802--

11) From: Sheila Quinn
A decaf cappuccino at night is marvelous! I'm glad Tom stocks such GREAT 
decafs. They are amazingly good. A year ago, I never would have imagined 
drinking DECAF... LOL! ~Sheila
Sandy Andina wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Sheila Quinn
Nope - I can't watch television or read in there because my husband goes 
to bed very early. He's sound asleep by the time I even *think* about 
going to bed because he gets up at 3am. So no, those activities don't 
contribute. I stay downstairs to watch television, read, do puzzles, 
surf the web, etc. I've even ground coffee and made espresso long after 
he's asleep and it doesn't wake him - luckily! :)
Sandy Andina wrote:
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest