HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Labeling cloth bags (21 msgs / 467 lines)
1) From: DeCambre.Peter
I will be out of the office starting  11/26/2002 and will not return
until 12/02/2002.
I will respond to your message when I return.
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2) From: Kris McN
A question for those of you who use the SM cloth bags - how do you label
them?  Tie-on tags?  Color-coded twine?  Laundry marker?  Elaborate diagrams
and maps on 4'x8' dry-erase boards?  I've finally built up enough of a stash
that I have quite a few bags of beans in my pantry that all look alike.
Kris McN

3) From: Bill Morgan
I now cut the SM label from the plastic bag the greens arrive in, with wide
margins, then cover the from of it with clear plastic tape, and then trim
the "laminated" label to size.  Finally I punch a hole in one corner and
thread that onto the bag's string.
Oh, if I'm really feeling organized I write the month of arrival on the
label before taping it, having built up enough of a stash to require
worrying about not letting any get too old.
HTH,
Bill
On 1/20/07, Kris McN  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: john nanavati
I simply place the SM plastice bag inside the cloth bag.
On 1/20/07, Kris McN  wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanavati
Plainfield, New Jersey

5) From: Derek Bradford
Sharpie...nice to see the history of the bags over time.
--Derek
On 1/20/07, john nanavati  wrote:
<Snip>
-- http://www.novernae.comHome of the Wandering Sloth

6) From: Steven Van Dyke
If you use something like a hair dryer to warm the label on the
plastic bag you can peel the label off of it.  Then I use clear
shipping tape to stick it to the cloth bag (fold one end over so it's
easy to pull off the bag later)
At 01:49 AM 1/20/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Howellite
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I just put the beans in the cloth bag and cut out the label part of the
plastic bag and tape it on the cloth bag using shipping tape.  Although
I do like the elegant solution mentioned earlier of numbering the bags
and having a master list.
 
Paul

8) From: Ronnie Kramer
I peel the label off the zip-locs the green comes in, then use box tape to tape it on the cotton bag.
Kris McN  wrote:  A question for those of you who use the SM cloth bags - how do you label them?  Tie-on tags?  Color-coded twine?  Laundry marker?  Elaborate diagrams and maps on 4'x8' dry-erase boards?  I've finally built up enough of a stash that I have quite a few bags of beans in my pantry that all look alike. 
Kris McN
Ronnie Kramer
Austin, TX

9) From: Eddie Dove
I'm curious.  Wouldn't a "Best Practice" be to attach the label to the
string or to write on the bag?  It seems that if you are putting plastic or
tape on one side / part of the bag, you are creating a place for
concentrating moisture where the rest of the bag my breath.  Maybe the
coffee is not kept long enough for this to be an issue or maybe its not an
issue at all.  I am asking because I am curious ... I have never used the
cotton bags.
How do you store your cotton bags full of beans?
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

10) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I do a 2 fold method I put the SM label inside and on bags I know will
hold the same beans for a while (my big buys) I use a sharpie to write
the name on the outside...
Dennis 
AKA 
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True 
Safety Dept 
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) 
FPO AE 09532-2830 
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the southern hemisphere 
 "On station and on point 125 and counting down..." 
Haven't we been here before?

11) From: an iconoclast
On 1/19/07, Kris McN  wrote:
<Snip>
I usually buy 20 lb and 5 lb bags.  When I get a 20 lb bag, I take the label
off the bag, scan it to a Word document and cut out another label for a 5 lb
cotton bag.  I keep the 20 lb burlap bags as stock and refill the 5 lb
cotton bags as needed. Having the exact label on the 5 lb bag helps me know
how to roast this particular bean as I take the bags outside with me.
If I get 5 lb bags in plastic, I cut out the label and tape it on with clear
mailing tape. (It's such a small area, I don't think it interferes with the
breathability of the beans, Eddie. I too, don't keep beans very long.)  Same
with 2 lb bags if I ever buy them.
I put all my 20 lb and 5 lb bags into large coffee logo burlap bags I bought
from SM for $2 each and put these under the side tables next to a futon in
the "room with a view" and the living room. It adds ambience.
I write the name and quantity of beans I have on hand alternating 6
different colors of chalk on a vintage leather bound slate school chalkboard
hanging on my kitchen wall next to an old fashioned phone.  Now if I could
find fine point colored chalk, I would be happy.
Take care,
Ann
-- 
Sweet Maria's list searchable archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/index.htm

12) From: Michael Dhabolt
Ann,
On 1/20/07, an iconoclast  wrote:
<Snip>
A strip of emery paper (couple inches wide), fixed to a similar sized piece
of wood with a handle fashioned on one end........sort of looks like a foot
and a half long paddle.  Similar smaller tool used to be used to get real
fine point on mechanical drawing pencils.  Sharpen the chalk over a waste
basket.  That's what the Nuns used to use (and 'yes', for both uses).
Mike (just plain)

13) From: Sharon Allsup
I buy almost exclusively 2-pounders, with the occasional 1-pound
specialty thrown in, or once a year maybe a 5 or 10-pounder.  So 90%
of my beans cabinet is 2-lb cloth or plastic bags.  Currently I'm at
around 100-125# in the stash, which is a lot of identical-looking 2-lb
bags!
I've got a stash of 2x3 sticky labels on continual-feed backing (the
kind stores used to print price tags to stick onto their shelving).  I
just write the info on the label using a sharpie, and stick it to the
bag.  Usually I'll then just slap a single strip of regular tape over
the top to provide a bit more stickyness.
Then the plastic bag the beans came in gets folded over a few times
and put inside the cloth, along with the beans.  That way the
original's included if the outside label ever falls off.  So far I've
not had to rely on that because whenever the outside label does fall
off, it's been while I was handling it so I knew what I had in-hand.
Usually this is done the first time I roast that bean, so the new
stuff stays in its plastic bag for up to a few weeks, then it's 1.75#
going into the cotton bag instead of the full 2 lbs.
I don't write crop year on the label, but I do write the arrival date
on the SM label for everything that comes in ... for rotation/use
purposes.

14) From: an iconoclast
On 1/20/07, Michael Dhabolt  wrote:
<Snip>
I'm going to try that emery paper.  The Nuns.....should have pulled that out
of my memory.  My dad taught at the same Catholic school I went to. But the
memories are fading.
Take care,
Ann
-- 
Sweet Maria's list searchable archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/index.htm

15) From: MichaelB
A very quick way to label - use a bit of masking tape and a permanent
marker. Easy to apply. Easy to remove.
On 1/20/07, Kris McN  wrote:
<Snip>
--
MichaelB

16) From: Larry English
I lay down my cloth bags label-side-up in a cool room with roughly 40%
humidity - it's where I keep my red wines, but not 55F - more like 62-66F
most of the year.
On 1/20/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"You can't know the unknowable, but you can do the doable." - Jon Carroll

17) From: Leo Zick
This is a multipart message in MIME format.
Ditto, except I hole punch the plastic descriptions, and loop them through
the strings..
From: David Echelbarger [mailto:DEchelbarger] 
Sent: Saturday, January 20, 2007 4:52 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: RE: +Labeling cloth bags
I just cut out the  descriptions that come on the plastic bags and tape them
to the cotton bags.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Kris McN
Sent: Saturday, January 20, 2007 2:50 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: +Labeling cloth bags
A question for those of you who use the SM cloth bags - how do you label
them?  Tie-on tags?  Color-coded twine?  Laundry marker?  Elaborate diagrams
and maps on 4'x8' dry-erase boards?  I've finally built up enough of a stash
that I have quite a few bags of beans in my pantry that all look alike. 
Kris McN

18) From: Leo Zick
This is a multipart message in MIME format.
Sounds a little dry for wine, no?
From: Larry English [mailto:larrylenglish] 
Sent: Saturday, January 20, 2007 10:13 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Labeling cloth bags
I lay down my cloth bags label-side-up in a cool room with roughly 40%
humidity - it's where I keep my red wines, but not 55F - more like 62-66F
most of the year.
On 1/20/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
I'm curious.  Wouldn't a "Best Practice" be to attach the label to the
string or to write on the bag?  It seems that if you are putting plastic or
tape on one side / part of the bag, you are creating a place for
concentrating moisture where the rest of the bag my breath.  Maybe the
coffee is not kept long enough for this to be an issue or maybe its not an
issue at all.  I am asking because I am curious ... I have never used the
cotton bags. 
How do you store your cotton bags full of beans?
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/ 
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
-- 
"You can't know the unknowable, but you can do the doable." - Jon Carroll 

19) From: Larry English
Yes, a little dry and a little warm - recommended humidity is 50% (and
recommended temp 55F) but it is what it is.  I haven't tried to add
temperature or humidity controls to the space.  It has worked well for
almost 25 years now, including storage of some Bordeaux classified growths
over 20 years or so that are drinking nicely still.  And it has worked very
well for the greens.
Larry
On 1/21/07, Leo Zick  wrote:
<Snip>

20) From: Ken Bozarth
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I used to tape (used masking and clear plastic) my labels on the outside of
the bag.  But after trying to figure out which bag the label laying on the
floor came from, I now use this method.
 
I just created a template in word and print it out on a 3x5 index card.  The
information is printed in two places on the card.  I cut it in two pieces,
put one inside the bag, and fold over the corner of the other piece, punch a
whole in the doubled over part and attach it to the string.  I only use
cloth bags for long term storage.  
 
The piece inside the bag saves me in case I accidentally tear off (hasn't
happened yet) the outside label.  
 
I wish I had one of those large vacuum sealing machines to store 10lbs at a
time in a sealed bag.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Larry English
Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 12:38 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Labeling cloth bags
Yes, a little dry and a little warm - recommended humidity is 50% (and
recommended temp 55F) but it is what it is.  I haven't tried to add
temperature or humidity controls to the space.  It has worked well for
almost 25 years now, including storage of some Bordeaux classified growths
over 20 years or so that are drinking nicely still.  And it has worked very
well for the greens. 
Larry
On 1/21/07, Leo Zick  wrote: 
Sounds a little dry for wine, no?
From: Larry English [mailto:larrylenglish] 
Sent: Saturday, January 20, 2007 10:13 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Labeling cloth bags
I lay down my cloth bags label-side-up in a cool room with roughly 40%
humidity - it's where I keep my red wines, but not 55F - more like 62-66F
most of the year.
On 1/20/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
I'm curious.  Wouldn't a "Best Practice" be to attach the label to the
string or to write on the bag?  It seems that if you are putting plastic or
tape on one side / part of the bag, you are creating a place for
concentrating moisture where the rest of the bag my breath.  Maybe the
coffee is not kept long enough for this to be an issue or maybe its not an
issue at all.  I am asking because I am curious ... I have never used the
cotton bags. 
How do you store your cotton bags full of beans?
Eddie
-- 

21) From: miKe mcKoffee
Are you implying you have a "small" vacuum sealing machine of some type?
FoodSavers "can" seal large qty of beans. Reminds me of when Tom sent a
bunch of bags pre-roasted Monkey for PNWGI. I made two very looooooong (well
over 10 foot long each) FoodSaver bags and vac' sealed them all for the few
days before PNWG! It was hilarious, to me anyway:-)
I used to vac' greens in 5# bags or larger, but for the last couple years
always break greens up into 2.5# bags at most (5 roast batches). Find it's
much easier to handle cutting open, pour out and weigh the greens then
re-vac seal relatively smaller bags.
Speaking of which Big Brown moments ago delivered my Wednesday evening order
of 8x5# plus 8x1# Sampler so have vac bagging to do! Only one of the 1#
Samplers was one of the 5 pounders ordered.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Ken Bozarth
	Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 11:13 AM
	
	I wish I had one of those large vacuum sealing machines to store
10lbs at a time in a sealed bag.


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