HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Aeropress first try (4 msgs / 89 lines)
1) From: Pat Murray
Good morning!
I just brewed three different beans in my new Aeropress from SM.  All
great!  First a Papua New Guinea, then a Sumatra, and I'm now sipping a wet
Yirg.  I am very pleased with the results.
I like the concept of limiting the contact time of water with the grounds.
With my TV, the first half of the water has already removed 99% of the
flavors and oils and the last half of the brew seems like it is just hot
water washing over the already extracted grounds.
After this coffee sits in my thermos at work for an hour or two it's flavors
are deteriorating badly.
Now I'll be able to easily have a great fresh cup at work.
(I brewed with 200F water, I'll experiment  cooler temps also)
Have a great weekend,
Pat

2) From: Donald Varona
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I've been experimenting with brewing coffee with my TV.  Although my 
roaster setup hasn't arrived yet (on Tuesday!  UPS promises!), I've been 
using coffee from a local roaster as well as other pre-roasted coffee.  
I'm varying the settings on my grinder and the amount of grinds in the 
basket to find a good balance.  Since the TV brews hotter, and I've got 
a new grinder (Virtuoso), I've had to change my original norms.
Originally my first TV experiences produced some untasty astringent 
brews.  I was guessing this was due to overextraction, so I made the 
grind coarser.  I've found a better balance with more grounds and moving 
up from 7 to 14 on the grind scale.  Unfortunately I don't have the 
proportion of grinds to water for you since my measuring means are still 
limited (Tuesday!  UPS promises!!), but you might try something similar.
And the last half of the water is not necessarily a bad thing; drip brew 
coffee is also about balance, meaning the right amount of water for the 
total amount of coffee.  If you're concerned about this, use less water 
and add hot water afterwards to get the right balance.  It means you 
need an extra hot water source, but experimentation is the only way I 
know of to improve things for your setup.
--dv
Pat Murray wrote:
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3) From: Pat Murray
Don't get me wrong, I'm very happy with the TV, I've been using it for 6-8
months and it is the only drip brewer I have ever liked.   I am just excited
about the cup flavor and aroma obtained from the Aeropress, a contact time
of less than a minute seems to produse some great results.  (BTW- I mostly
use 50g of beans for a 1Litre pot in the TV.
On 1/20/07, Donald Varona  wrote:
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4) From: Scott Marquardt
It's turning out that the Aero's fast brewing isn't entirely due to
the use of a fine grind. This may be easily demonstrated; grind a bit
coarser and press a lot harder. You'll end up with about the same
extraction.
This is a bit grinder dependent.
What's happening is that the puck that forms in the Aero is capable of
becoming substantially compressed (especially near the bottom), and
this accelerates the extraction of the grind as the water passes out.
In other words, it turns out that the press in an Aero is a lot more
than "the occasion upon which one terminates the extraction process by
deftly removing the brew from the grind." How one presses has a
significant bearing on whether the cup will be under-extracted,
over-extracted, or just so.
This was a bit of a surprising discovery -- or rather, the extent to
which it factors into the Aero's extraction was a bit of a surprise.
Practical advice? If you're multitasking while brewing in an Aero and
you go overtime, press lighter than usual to finish, even if it takes
a bit longer. Swirl the Aero as you go to break up the puck, if
possible. It will prevent over-extraction.
- S
On 1/20/07, Pat Murray  wrote:
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