HomeRoast Digest


Topic: the zillionth "blend suggestions?" thread (18 msgs / 569 lines)
1) From: stereoplegic
i'd like to do a pre- roast blend to test my eWOK/CO's max capacity (1# 
is the biggest i've done so far).
miKe, you suggest @ least 24hr pre-roast vac-seal to equalize moisture 
content, right?
here's what i have to work w/:
11oz costa rica la candelila pulp natural
10.5oz guatemala fraijanes finca agua tibia
10.5oz east timor fto maubesse
8oz indian monsooned malibar*
    (*no specifics as i got this one locally, really only partially
    monsooned, lesson learned, but still not bad)
with these in mind, waddaya think?

2) From: Floyd Lozano
while someone is answering this, could folks comment on whether pre-roast or
post roast blending is preferred?
On 1/22/07, stereoplegic  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Aaron
While I am not an expert at blending, Id  say post blending might be 
better.  You have more control over the beans characteristics that way....
Some coffee's roast faster than others.
Some you might want at city
Some you might want at FC+
By roasting each then blending them, you get each bean to the best of 
it's specific characteristics and are not stuck with a 'batch' that's 
cooked to whenever you hit the stop switch.  Possibly uneven, or so dark 
it's almost like charbucks.
Im not saying that mixing first then roasting is going to turn out a 
failure but, if you are blending you are probably doing so for 
flavor.... you'll have more control of the bean and its flavor potential 
if you roast first.  I do blend on occasion but it's nothing 
scientific.  Whenever I have an ounce or two of greens left over, I 
throw them into a container, when it gets half a pound or so, ill mix it 
up and roast it.  What's in it and how much of each, I havent a clue.. 
but yep it does still taste good!
Aaron

4) From: stereoplegic
pre-roast has worked for me so far w/ similar beans (like nicaragua and 
wp costa rica) as my eWOK/CO (SC/TO variant ( http://snipurl.com/eWOK_CO))roasts very evenly. the beans i'm asking 
about are different in proc. method and thus probably moisture content 
(except maybe timor and guat), hence the vac-seal question for miKe. i 
want to pre-blend some or all of these to see how much torque the 
stirring motor can dish out. i especially want to use up the 
"semi-monsooned" malibar (not bad, just not great) before i dip into the 
real thing (2# from SM's this time, as i said in original post, lesson 
learned).
TrueDW wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: stereoplegic
to be fair to the other (local, i bet justin knows who i'm talking 
about) guys' "semi-monsooned" malibar, it did make a very nice shot of 
espresso @ FC+. Drip's hint of spice at C+ to FC was also nice, but i 
wish it was more than just a hint. i do think it could do well singing 
backup to @least 1 of the other 3 coffees (all SM's).
stereoplegic wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: miKe mcKoffee
Whether "preferable" to pre-blend or post-blend depends IMO. While absolute
profile control of each individual bean (varietal) in the blend might be
preferred, it also might be totally unnecessary. 
Here's Tom's comments from his blending page:
"I get a lot of questions about blending before or after roasting ...which
is better? Well, if you have an established blend it certainly is easier to
blend the coffee green and roast it together. If you are experimenting with
blend ingredients and percentages you will want to pre-roast each separately
so you can experiment with variations without having to make a new roast
with each change. The case for roasting coffees individually is strong with
the Melange type blend (see below) and with a handful of particular coffees,
such as Robusta in espresso blends. Some coffees are more dense, or have
extreme size variations. These will roast differently than standard
wet-processed arabicas. All dry-processed arabicas require roasting to a
slightly higher degree of temperature. But in most cases the coffees can be
roasted together and I would advise this: roast the coffee together until
you encounter a situation where the results are disappointing and for
success you must roast them separately. Every coffee roasts a bit
differently but there is a great deal of averaging that occurs between
coffees in the roast chamber, especially in drum roast systems. And then
there's the coffees that do not roast evenly as single origins either:
Yemeni, Ethiopian DP coffees, etc. Uneven roast color is not a defect, and
only when it occurs in a wet-processed arabica that should roast to an even
color (and sometimes not even in this case) is it of any consequence."
(end cut & paste of Tom's comments)
Re moisture content. Equalizing pre-blend bean moisture content wasn't my
idea but read it somewhere and it only makes sense IMO. However, it's not
because of processing method differences. There seems to be a misconception
that dry-processed versus wet-processed equates to different moisture
content in the dried coffee bean. Such is not inherently the case from all
my readings. All coffee processing has a target drying target of "around"
12% for the green bean itself. But that around 12% can vary substantially.
What to blend depends on what you want to achieve. I agree with Tom that ya
gotta know each SO before you even think about blending 'em. What is the
brewing method target? And since the primary reason is simply to use up
smaller amounts to test a larger roast batch method does it really matter!
Looking at the four you have and the amounts of each heck, just dump them
all together. Then roast it about to Light Full City (roast thinking about
2nd but just barely not quite there) in 12 to 14 minutes with a good 3:30 to
4:30 start of 1st to end of roast. I'd bet it'll be a very good cup. Unless
targeted for straight shots then I'd go 4:30 to 5:00 minutes start of 1st of
end of roast Full City maybe first early 2nd cracks but not into 2nd.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>

7) From: Coffeenut
Post-roast blending is best if you have the time to do it, especially if the
beans behave very differently in times to 1st C.  Posy-roast blending allows
you to roast each bean to it's best (or your preferred) potential rather
than lumping several varieties together that have different roast profile
needs.
With that said, I'll also say that you can achieve good results with
pre-roast blends as well.  I do a fair amount of pre-roast and it's
typically with beans that have similar roast profiles/needs.  A good example
of a pre-roast blend that I do quite often is "Red Sea" blend.  That blend
uses equal parts of Harar Horse, Ethiopian Sidamo and Yemen Mokha Ismaili
Hirazi (or Zambia AAA if I'm out of the Hirazi).  These beans roast well
together and it's one of my favorite blends.
I don't vac-seal my blends before roasting, but am not discounting it since
I've not tried it.
Rick

8) From: stereoplegic
thanks to everyone who responded. i know and like all of these (though 
this particular malibar could be better). i just might try both roast 
levels, though this would be primarily for drip brew and, as mentioned, 
roaster experimentation.
mcKona wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: richedie10
Do you guys find that blending achieves greater results than roasting single origin? 
How about for a MokaJava blend which i really like. Should this be roasted in advance and is there a preferred roast for each if I use Ethiopian and Sumatra fro mSweet Marias?
Also, where can I purchase Ethiopian Rara Horse? I keep seeing this mentioned.
Thanks!
rchase---------

10) From: stereoplegic
that's harrar horse, and SM's doesn't have any right now. try idido 
misty valley or the dp sidamo. i've seen harrar @ other green websites, 
but i'll wait till SM's gets more (read my posts about the monsooned 
malabar lesson learned).
richedie10 wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Jeff Oien
richedie10 wrote:
<Snip>
I don't think blending would achieve greater results than single
origins and post roast blending. But you only have to do one roast
instead of two or three or however many you're blending and if you're
like me and don't drink a large volume each day it's nice.
I find Mokha/Java to be a good one to do preroast blend because
I find Yemen and either Java or Sumatra and sometimes Harar to all
be good at FC+. The Idido or DP Sidamo would probably be better
lighter.
JeffO

12) From: Les
Blending is a whole new vista for the homeroaster.  First off I would highly
recommend trying Tom's Monkey blend as a good preroast blend to try.  I like
it all brew methods.  Lessons I have learned about blending.
1. Post roast blending is the easiest.  If you mess up a ratio on the first
try you can change it on the next batch.  I roast a pound at a time, but I
don't simply blend everything together all at once.
2.  I have developed some standard blends that I like, that follow a general
rule.  These are preroast blended.  One is as follows: 50% Dry Processes
Brazil (8oz); 25% Sumarta (4oz); 25% High Grown Central (Bourbon or Typica)
(4oz).  If I am going to use it strictly as an espresso blend, I add 4oz of
Monsooned Malabar.  ( I enjoyed this blend this morning.  Espresso was
liquid silk and I am still enjoying a bit of aftertaste at 3 hours!)
3.  One I learned from Pecan Jim.  Post roast blend of the same bean at
different rest periods One of my favorites is 4 day rested Uganda Bugisu
with 12 hour rested Bugisu.  You get the rich chocolate of the fresher roast
with the complexity that develops with the longer rest.
4.Blends of different degrees of roast.  I have done this often with a good
Yemen or Ethiopian bean.  You get the fruit of the lighter roast and the
deeper tones of the darker roast.
Last, there should be a purpose in mind when blending.  Just putting a bunch
of beans together and hoping something will happen doesn't seem to work that
well.  I have tossed a bunch of left over beans together and roasted them.
You end up with a nice cup of coffee and that is about it.
So, what are you after when you are blending should a question you ask
yourself.  One blend that I often use is a 50/50 Kenya with a nice Brazil.
You can pull shots with that blend and experience the wonderful wild flavors
of the Kenya without putting your taste buds in overload.
Les

13) From: Justin Marquez
On 1/22/07, Les  wrote:
<Snip>
Generally I do not blend beans, green or roasted.
Usually I do end up with a few small quantity of greens at the ends of
the bags. I almost always just toss enough together of whatever to
make a decent-sized batch for the HG/DB.  I always end up with at
least a nice cup.  I have never ended up with a bad cup. Occasionally
I end up with a great cup.  It is ALWAYS better than 4$ or Foulgers.
Certainly this is not a "blend" in the traditional sense of
"attempting to make something specific to happen" but it is always
worth doing!
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

14) From: Coffeenut
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
What blends do for me is open up more variety in flavors.  I dearly love
many SO coffees all by themselves, but also love what a blend can achieve.
Mike had a good point about getting to know your SO's well so that you can
have a better idea of what to do with them in blends.  
Mokha Java was one of the first blends I created and is a great starter
blend to show you what can be done.  I prefer a Sulawesi Toraja and Harar
Horse or Ethiopian Sidamo in that blend, but you can play with other choices
that basically fit that blend's suggested origin.
If you read Tom's messages about having trouble finding a good Harar the
past year or so, that's why it's been in short supply on his website.  So
that opens the question "where did all the Harar go that Tom felt was not up
to his standards"?  It likely ended up somewhere for sale and that's what
you have to watch in sourcing beans from other places.  There are reputable
suppliers that sell greens and I've "occasionally" used them when I'm
seeking something not on SM's list.  But, if you want the in-depth
critique/review that Tom provides with his beans, it is non-existent at
other companies from what I can find.  I do trust Tom's offerings as being
high quality and even when they are not the best he's cupped, he tells you
that too.  I don't know anyone that does that at the other green bean
suppliers.
Hope this helps,
Rick  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of
richedie10
Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 12:32 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: RE: +the zillionth "blend suggestions?" thread
Do you guys find that blending achieves greater results than roasting single
origin? 
How about for a MokaJava blend which i really like. Should this be roasted
in advance and is there a preferred roast for each if I use Ethiopian and
Sumatra fro mSweet Marias?
Also, where can I purchase Ethiopian Rara Horse? I keep seeing this
mentioned.
Thanks!
rchase---------

15) From: Coffeenut
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
What blends do for me is open up more variety in flavors.  I dearly love
many SO coffees all by themselves, but also love what a blend can achieve.
Mike had a good point about getting to know your SO's well so that you can
have a better idea of what to do with them in blends.  
Mokha Java was one of the first blends I created and is a great starter
blend to show you what can be done.  I prefer a Sulawesi Toraja and Harar
Horse or Ethiopian Sidamo in that blend, but you can play with other choices
that basically fit that blend's suggested origin.
If you read Tom's messages about having trouble finding a good Harar the
past year or so, that's why it's been in short supply on his website.  So
that opens the question "where did all the Harar go that Tom felt was not up
to his standards"?  It likely ended up somewhere for sale and that's what
you have to watch in sourcing beans from other places.  There are reputable
suppliers that sell greens and I've "occasionally" used them when I'm
seeking something not on SM's list.  But, if you want the in-depth
critique/review that Tom provides with his beans, it is non-existent at
other companies from what I can find.  I do trust Tom's offerings as being
high quality and even when they are not the best he's cupped, he tells you
that too.  I don't know anyone that does that at the other green bean
suppliers.
Hope this helps,
Rick  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of
richedie10
Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 12:32 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: RE: +the zillionth "blend suggestions?" thread
Do you guys find that blending achieves greater results than roasting single
origin? 
How about for a MokaJava blend which i really like. Should this be roasted
in advance and is there a preferred roast for each if I use Ethiopian and
Sumatra fro mSweet Marias?
Also, where can I purchase Ethiopian Rara Horse? I keep seeing this
mentioned.
Thanks!

16) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I post roast blend (My fav if 2 parts IMV to 1 part Bug) due to my roast
size with the Z&D is only a 1/4 pound 
 
Dennis 
AKA 
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True 
Safety Dept 
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) 
FPO AE 09532-2830 
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the southern hemisphere 
 "On station and on point 124 and counting down..."

17) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
Yea what he said..... That what I meant....
While I am not an expert at blending, Id  say post blending might be 
better.  You have more control over the beans characteristics that
way....
Some coffee's roast faster than others.
Some you might want at city
Some you might want at FC+
By roasting each then blending them, you get each bean to the best of 
it's specific characteristics and are not stuck with a 'batch' that's 
cooked to whenever you hit the stop switch.  Possibly uneven, or so dark
it's almost like charbucks.
Im not saying that mixing first then roasting is going to turn out a 
failure but, if you are blending you are probably doing so for 
flavor.... you'll have more control of the bean and its flavor potential
if you roast first.  I do blend on occasion but it's nothing 
scientific.  Whenever I have an ounce or two of greens left over, I 
throw them into a container, when it gets half a pound or so, ill mix it
up and roast it.  What's in it and how much of each, I havent a clue.. 
but yep it does still taste good!
Aaron

18) From: Eddie Dove
Rich Edie wrote, "Also, where can I purchase Ethiopian Rara Horse? I keep
seeing this mentioned."
Sweet Maria's when it is available; this is not CoffeeGeek.
Rich,
Make sure you review the rules of this list such as:
Since we pay for the list, we do not allow outside commercial posts of any
kind. This includes regular emails with commercial references, URLs,
addresses or 800 numbers of products we offer or like products. That may
seem harsh, but think of it this way: the discussion on the list takes place
in our establishment ...it's as if 300 homeroasters are sitting around a
cozy (albeit a very large) table in our shop. It would be rude to come in
our shop, where we work so hard to offer so much, and talk about the guy
down the road who sells xxx for $x.xx! If in doubt, please send the email
with commercial reference to me first (tom) for approval.
Obviously, some commercial references are necessary for constructive
dialogue. But this list IS NOT alt.coffee!!! Paying for the list also
insures that your email address is not exposed to spam-sending folks who buy
email lists from "free" web-based mail list servers.
Also, below my name is a link to a searchable archive of the Sweet Maria's
mailing list.  You may find it quite helpful.
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/22/07, richedie10  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/22/07, richedie10  wrote:
<Snip>


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