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Topic: Are Coffee Plants Cannibalistic? (7 msgs / 175 lines)
1) From: Tim TenClay
I have a little coffee plant - It's about two years old and 4 inches tall.
I planted it from a seed a couple of years ago when Tom offered a few
cherries.  I planted several this is the only one that took off.  It's doing
ok... I think it's awful tiny but that's probably a result of the fact that,
in SW Michigan the sun doesn't shine from about September to June.
Anyhow, I've heard people talk about putting coffee grounds in their
soil/gardens.  Should I feed my little plant with some spent grounds?  Would
it like that or would cannibalism offend its sensibilities?
Just wondering.
Grace and Peace,
  `tim
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Rev. Tim TenClay, IAPC, NATA #253
Dunningville Reformed Church (www.dunningville.org)
Knots & More Tatting Supplies (www.knotsandmore.com)
Personal Blog:http://www.tenclay.org/blog

2) From: Justin Marquez
On 1/22/07, Tim TenClay  wrote:
<Snip>
Might that not lead to "Mad Caffeine Disease"...?
 Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

3) From:
yes, feed you plants some coffee grounds and call it whatever Tim my lad.
g
---- Tim TenClay  wrote: 
<Snip>

4) From: Paul Goelz
At 01:17 PM 1/22/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
My two coffee plants are about 5-6 years old and have done well in 
spite of forgetting to water them too many times.  One is about 4' 
tall and the other maybe 3'.  They flowered last year.... OK, just a 
couple flowers.  But they were flowers.
I just used Miracle Grow.... works fine.
Paul
Paul Goelz
Rochester Hills, MI
paul at pgoelz dot comhttp://www.pgoelz.com

5) From: Kris McN
In as far as most all plants are cannibals (they'll "eat" the by-products of
their own leaf litter breakdown, for example), sure.   However, I'd put my
coffee grounds in your compost and feed the compost to your plant.  The
uncomposted grounds can deplete nutrients available to your plant as they
decompose, especially if it's in a container of some sort.  Not a huge deal
probably, but if you want your plant to thrive...
Kris McN
On 1/22/07, Tim TenClay  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: jim gundlach
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On Jan 22, 2007, at 12:17 PM, Tim TenClay wrote:
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Remember that coffee beans, like all other seeds are baby plants with  
a package of the best plant food nature could produce to get that  
baby growing. Most plants produce many seeds in order to get one  
plant growing. The coffee plant has managed to organize the behavior  
of millions of human beings around the goal of growing, protecting,  
and extending the range of the coffee plant by giving humans the  
great majority of coffee seeds to process, roast, grind, extract the  
vital juices from and drink.  So when you use some of the coffee  
seeds to fertilize another coffee plant, you are simply going along  
with the coffee species'  strategy of controlling and manipulating  
human behavior to maximize the chances of survival of young coffee  
plants.
     Pecan Jim
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On Jan 22, 2007, =
at 12:17 PM, Tim TenClay wrote:
Anyhow, I've heard = people talk about putting coffee grounds in their soil/gardens.  = Should I feed my little plant with some spent grounds?  Would it like = that or would cannibalism offend its = sensibilities? Remember that = coffee beans, like all other seeds are baby plants with a package of the = best plant food nature could produce to get that baby growing. Most = plants produce many seeds in order to get one plant growing. The coffee = plant has managed to organize the behavior of millions of human beings = around the goal of growing, protecting, and extending the range of the = coffee plant by giving humans the great majority of coffee seeds to = process, roast, grind, extract the vital juices from and drink.  So = when you use some of the coffee seeds to fertilize another coffee plant, = you are simply going along with the coffee species'  strategy of = controlling and manipulating human behavior to maximize the chances of = survival of young coffee plants.
    Pecan = Jim = --Apple-Mail-18-127535674--

7) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Jim,
     I think you're right on with this response. FWIW, I'd also like to add
that coffee farmers regularly use coffee processing "left-overs" for
fertilizer due to its extremely dense nutrient content. Can't go wrong with
coffee (any part of the cherry) as fertilizer.
Tim,
     Only thing is you need to be aware of is the acidity of the coffee
grounds. Here's  a great
explaination of how to properly use coffee grounds as fertilizer.
---Remember that coffee beans, like all other seeds are baby plants with
a package of the best plant food nature could produce to get that
baby growing. Most plants produce many seeds in order to get one
plant growing. The coffee plant has managed to organize the behavior
of millions of human beings around the goal of growing, protecting,
and extending the range of the coffee plant by giving humans the
great majority of coffee seeds to process, roast, grind, extract the
vital juices from and drink.  So when you use some of the coffee
seeds to fertilize another coffee plant, you are simply going along
with the coffee species'  strategy of controlling and manipulating
human behavior to maximize the chances of survival of young coffee
plants.
     Pecan Jim


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