HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Larger Capacity Home "Dream Roaster"??? (15 msgs / 372 lines)
1) From: Edward Bourgeois
Have finished building (except exhaust system) my roaster. As I was building
this one I was also thinking of my next one! The only given is that it will
be for those who want to be able to roast more than the 8-9oz. limit of
available store bought roasters. I'm trying to get a sense what features in
a home roaster are needed and how important each feature is.  From posts I
find we roast with different combinations of senses and science. Some judge
more by visual, sounds, smell, temps., times etc. and most with a
combination of some or all. So when it comes to features of a "Dream Roaster
" what would they be and please comment on their importance. Cost and
Dependability too.
thanks,Ed B.
This is my present roasterhttp://coffee-roasting.blogspot.com/

2) From: Paul Jolly
Ed, I've said it before and I'll say it again: that's a very nice setup you've made.  I like how all components are on one cart and are logically organized.  The roaster itself, of course, is the critical link & it looks like you've got that working very well.  Have you started to run cost estimates yet?
   
  Paul
---------------------------------
Need a quick answer? Get one in minutes from people who know. Ask your question on Yahoo! Answers.

3) From: Sean Cary
What are you using for stirring arms?  
 
Nice setup - I have the TO of an SC/TO - but may go the bread machine route
- seems to be a bit more robust then the SC.
 
Sean M. Cary
Major USMC
Tempus Fugit Memento Mori  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Edward Bourgeois
Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 4:11 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +Larger Capacity Home "Dream Roaster"???
Have finished building (except exhaust system) my roaster. As I was building
this one I was also thinking of my next one! The only given is that it will
be for those who want to be able to roast more than the 8-9oz. limit of
available store bought roasters. I'm trying to get a sense what features in
a home roaster are needed and how important each feature is.  From posts I
find we roast with different combinations of senses and science. Some judge
more by visual, sounds, smell, temps., times etc. and most with a
combination of some or all. So when it comes to features of a "Dream Roaster
" what would they be and please comment on their importance. Cost and
Dependability too. 
thanks,Ed B.
This is my present roasterhttp://coffee-roasting.blogspot.com/

4) From: Rich M
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So many things...
First is the quality/consistency of the final product.  My IR2  
produces a pretty good product, but there is a lot of variation in  
the bean. I try to get it to where some beans are slightly over- 
roasted so that the majority are right where I want them. The ability  
for a slow roast with even bean color would be fantastic.
Second, the dependability of the unit. Nobody wants to mess with  
troubleshooting and having to deal with sending it back.
Third, simple or at least common sensical controls that allow  
tweaking during the roast process.
Personally, I can get a pound done in about 3 (sometime 4) roasts, so  
a huge capacity isn't a must-have for me. Convenient, but not a  
necessity.
Cost is always an issue, but I would be willing to pay more for a  
machine that would give me the above-referenced features. In fact, I  
was ready to buy a Gene Cafe this month (along with my Rocky  
doserless, and Technivorm).  That was until this past week when I  
went up to the cabin to put in new wood floors and found it had been  
broken into. New window,$1700;  New water pump to replace frozen and  
ruptured one, $600;  New tools, $500.  Waiting till Christmas to get  
my new coffee stuff, not priceless but necessary.  But I digress...
Rich M
On Jan 22, 2007, at 3:11 PM, Edward Bourgeois wrote:
<Snip>
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So many things...First is =
the quality/consistency of the final product.  My IR2 produces a =
pretty good product, but there is a lot of variation in the bean. I try =
to get it to where some beans are slightly over-roasted so that the =
majority are right where I want them. The ability for a slow roast with =
even bean color would be fantastic.Second, the dependability =
of the unit. Nobody wants to mess with troubleshooting and having to =
deal with sending it back.Third, simple or at least common =
sensical controls that allow tweaking during the roast =
process.Personally, I can get a pound done in about 3 =
(sometime 4) roasts, so a huge capacity isn't a must-have for me. =
Convenient, but not a necessity.
Cost is always an issue, = but I would be willing to pay more for a machine that would give me the = above-referenced features. In fact, I was ready to buy a Gene Cafe this = month (along with my Rocky doserless, and Technivorm).  That was until = this past week when I went up to the cabin to put in new wood floors and = found it had been broken into. New window,$1700;  New water pump to = replace frozen and ruptured one, $600;  New tools, $500.  Waiting = till Christmas to get my new coffee stuff, not priceless but necessary. = But I digress...
Rich M
On Jan 22, 2007, = at 3:11 PM, Edward Bourgeois wrote:
Have = finished building (except exhaust system) my roaster. As I was building = this one I was also thinking of my next one! The only given is that it = will be for those who want to be able to roast more than the 8-9oz. = limit of available store bought roasters. I'm trying to get a sense what = features in a home roaster are needed and how important each feature = is.  From posts I find we roast with different combinations of = senses and science. Some judge more by visual, sounds, smell, temps., = times etc. and most with a combination of some or all. So when it comes = to features of a "Dream Roaster " what would they be and please comment = on their importance. Cost and Dependability too. thanks,Ed = B. This is my present roaster http://coffee-roasting.blogs=pot.com/ = --Apple-Mail-3-75796378--

5) From: Edward Bourgeois
My next model is going to use a different drive motor The BM goes a little
faster than would be best . It also has a vulnerable to future failure bm
drive belt and plastic gears and I'm now looking for a drive gearmotor and
to be a least 2 speed. I'm also playing with the best size, shape and stir
speed/design for the roast pot. And a new housing for the motor. And I don't
want it to cost much.
Ed B.http://coffee-roasting.blogspot.com/

6) From: raymanowen
"I don't want it to cost much."
How high is that on your list of requirements?
Surplus Center has a  of gearmotors. A gas fired clothes dryer already
has the roaster's form, with a vent system in situ. A brand new one with
$1,000 or two worth of mods should put you in business.
If you want to spend just once and forget the roaster for 20 years, get a
Diedrich. It'll look neat and Cost Less over that period. Guaranteed good
coffee all that time, to boot.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
*
Disclaimer:* *These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This
product proposal is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any
disease.*

7) From: miKe mcKoffee
Again, kudos for a great home roaster build.
Hmmm, my "dream home roaster" requirements. 
1) Batch size flexible from 1/2 to 4 or 5 pounds, while maintaining profile
flexibility any batch size from 7 minutes to 20 minutes any degree of roast.
I.e. 7 minute French or 20 minute Cinnamon roasts and anything in between.
Able to reliably and repeatably profile temp rise ramp rates as slow as
5f/min and as fast as 40f/min. Plus ability to hold temp at a given temp. 
2) Temps measured both in bean mass and roast environment.
3) Seeing beans not too important, tryer mandatory.
4) Efficient chaff collection.
5) Able to control variable rate air flow regardless method of bean
agitation. (drum, auger etc.)
6) Easily dump roast to cooling without need of heavy duty gloves or
removing some piece of the roasting device. (About the only major weakness I
see in your design!)
7) Optionally fully programmable storable automated profiles, 2 dozen
minimum storable. With ability to change profile on the fly and go manual
roast mode on demand.
I think that sums it up. Something like thishttp://www.coffeeper.com/SF-6LB.htmlor thishttp://www.diedrichroasters.com/ir7.htmlDependability is there, cost is definitely "there" too! :-)">http://www.usroastercorp.com/3kiloroaster.htmthishttp://www.coffeeper.com/SF-6LB.htmlor thishttp://www.diedrichroasters.com/ir7.htmlDependability is there, cost is definitely "there" too! :-)
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Edward Bourgeois
	Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 1:11 PM
	
	Have finished building (except exhaust system) my roaster. As I was
building this one I was also thinking of my next one! The only given is that
it will be for those who want to be able to roast more than the 8-9oz. limit
of available store bought roasters. I'm trying to get a sense what features
in a home roaster are needed and how important each feature is.  From posts
I find we roast with different combinations of senses and science. Some
judge more by visual, sounds, smell, temps., times etc. and most with a
combination of some or all. So when it comes to features of a "Dream Roaster
" what would they be and please comment on their importance. Cost and
Dependability too. 
	thanks,Ed B.
	This is my present roaster
http://coffee-roasting.blogspot.com/

8) From: miKe mcKoffee
Oops, wrong Deidrich link, make that the IR3 not 7.http://www.diedrichroasters.com/ir3.html<Snip>

9) From: Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
Mike's got some good dreams here. Exception: seeing beans IS required (I
like to watch).   Please put his requirements into the following package:
Robust outdoor roaster with a relatively small footprint (i.e., smaller than
a barbeque).  Requires only a plug (20 amp is OK).  It will be shielded from
direct rain, but exposed to humidity and occasional fog, so it ought to be
adequately sealed with it's own custom cover.  No dangly wires. Should not
look like a Walmart product repurchased over Ebay.  About a thousand dollars
sounds like a reasonable price point, so I don't want it ugly.
Martin
On 1/23/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Martin
Heat + Beans
    all the rest is commentary

10) From: Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
previous post ending in caps was a mistake.  No shout intended.
Martin
On 1/23/07, Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary <
heatgunroast> wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Martin
Heat + Beans
    all the rest is commentary

11) From: Kim G
how about knob to control rate of temp change....deg/min....adjustable on
the fly
"Able to reliably and repeatably profile temp rise ramp rates as slow as
5f/min and as fast as 40f/min. Plus ability to hold temp at a given temp."
agree with mccoffee
<Snip>

12) From: miKe mcKoffee
I like seeing the beans during the roast too. Which is one reason a "tryer"
more important than simply a viewing window to me. Can not only pull beans
mid roast to see and deeply smell, but also keep beans out for various stage
of roast comparisons.
But of course both all the time seeing the beans AND tryer to pull 'em would
be even better!
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Heat + Beans
--all the rest is commentary
	Sent: Tuesday, January 23, 2007 10:34 AM
	
	Mike's got some good dreams here. Exception: seeing beans IS
required (I like to watch).   Please put his requirements into the following
package:
	
	Robust outdoor roaster with a relatively small footprint (i.e.,
smaller than a barbeque).  Requires only a plug (20 amp is OK).  It will be
shielded from direct rain, but exposed to humidity and occasional fog, so it
ought to be adequately sealed with it's own custom cover.  No dangly wires.
Should not look like a Walmart product repurchased over Ebay.  About a
thousand dollars soun ds like a reasonable price point, so I don't want it
ugly.
	Martin

13) From: Edward Bourgeois
Mike and others  Thanks for your "dream ideas" in a home roaster.  A tryer
is a great idea. The turbo oven tops are nice to just view through. Been
thinking of building my own turbo top to mount on a pot lid with a little
stronger, better and adjustable heat element and adjustable and better
convection fan. I would then add a small window  in a flapping pour spout on
the top also. The top would be attached yet removable to clean etc. then
they would dump similar to my present unit( could check that one off Mikes
list then)I think that all of the points on Mikes list are  possible. Just a
few more pots of coffee and I will have it worked out. Been ordering some
parts. Would like to do a micro production of a few ( have a nice little
workshop on the farm with the tools needed) if I can get it perfected. Just
keep looking at my Olympia Cremina for design inspiration.
Edhttp://coffee-roasting.blogspot.com/

14) From: Zara Haimo
<Snip>
One of the guys in my aikido class roasts for a local cafe (Dana St. in 
Mountain View for anyone in Silicon Valley).  I went by one day to see how a 
professional does it on a big roaster.  I don't think he gets quite as good 
beans as we get from SM, but he roasted them perfectly and didn't char them 
at all.  Towards the end of the roast he was constantly pulling samples with 
the tryer every couple of seconds so he could stop the roast exactly when he 
wanted - pretty interesting to see his technique and how much he used the 
tryer to control the roast.

15) From: J.W.Bullfrog
That is the best way.
On 1/31/07, Zara Haimo  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion.
I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate.
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.


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