HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Initial Notes on Diedrich HR-1, and other notes (23 msgs / 788 lines)
1) From: Diablo
I have put maybe 20# of total greens through the machine since last Thursday. 
Including the curing.  I have to say still that I am getting to know the
machine very much.
For as technical as this can be I still get a rough or semi barbaric feel off
the machine.  Only in the sense that one cannot program the ramping and such,
there is merely a knob with a low, medium and high setting for the heat.  This
is adequit however.  
Hi, my name is Leo, I was on popcorn poppers for almost 2 years.  I'm trying to
quit, but I feel like I have lost something in my roast.
With the poppers I could get a decent, for a drip brew, chocolate note from my
Dota Tarrazu.  They are gone now.  I'm a bit in a quandry as to why.  For the
method I used with poppers I had no temps and I could only go by time since
first, and start of a roll in second.  This would get me good chocolate notes
in my Dota.  
Several things I have noticed, well at least variables aside from other obvious
facts.  The hot air from a popper is constant, whatever it be.  Somewhere
around 430^ to 450^ I suspect.  Depending on your total footage of power
cords:)  This I think is one of the biggest reasons I have lost the chocolate
with the new roaster.  It's all in the ramping.  With poppers the only ramping
really is how fast or slow the beans absorb heat.  With this roaster the temp
is ramped up slow enough that the temp of the roaster and the beans are nearly
identical.  I suspect this, no way really to know the truth on that end without
a TC inside the machine.  From what I can observe on the outside the TC for the
roaster is in the bean mass towards the front end of the machine.  Seems to be
very accurate for actual bean temp.  First crack almost cosistantly identical
at 373^ every time.  
First and foremost, this roaster is consistant.  Last night I made a run with
some Peru.  In 3 roasts, 2 of the roasts hit identical temps at nearly all the
30 second benchmarks.  I preheat to 400^, drop the beans into the machine the
instant it hits 400^ and from that point on at 30" intervals my temp readings
were identical.  The 3rd roast was not spot on as the first and second.  I
suspect a bit of a chaff issue.  The collector seems to get overfilled easily. 
As well the Peru seems to be fairly high on the chaff content meter.  
I started the night by not roasting my working roast initally.  This because of
the many times I have read that the first roast of the session, like the first
pancake on the griddle, is often off just a bit.  So I decided to roast some
Dota for myself.  I tried to be extra careful and I stopped the roast at the
first snips of second, around 406^.  I have some great florals in it today, and
there wants to be a chocolate but it is not as prominant as with, sniff sniff
sigh, my poppers.  
(for the Dota, and probably my other beans as well) Against gut feelings I feel
the next step is to dive into second crack and explore it.  This is all I can
think is left to find those chocolate notes again.  Since I suspect that the
temps of the poppers was in the neighborhood of 430^ to 450^ this would mean
that starting of a rolling second would be up in those temps or close to.  My
roasts with the start of a second in the Diedrich have been at 413^ and dump at
the start of a roll around 417^-420^.  This with the Dota over the weekend.  I
still have to try more of that batch as well.  I have not revisited and cupped
that roast since Sunday when I noted that the jar was lacking the chocolate and
buttery aromas I have been used to.  
I was so used to the fast fast fast feeling from the poppers.  The temps rose
very fast and before you know it the roast is done at 8 minutes or so.  With
the Diedrich my average roast time is somewhere around 16 minutes.  The temp
ramping is slow.  This is giving me that feeling of more of a baked bean.  The
difference again between the poppers and Diedrich seems to be that the temps in
the chamber for the popper at start of a roll in second crack would be quite
higher.  Where in the Diedrich the temps are the temps, so the start of a roll
in second crack is not the same point roast-wise.  This is all I can conclude. 
Just thought I'd put out a bit of an update on my findings with the Diedrich. 
Any input is appreciate and welcomed.  I am very impressed with the machine and
I can see that all I need is more time with it.  I have already gotten to know
it very well and I know before I know it things will be quite second nature for
me.  
LR

2) From: MichaelB
Leo,
I'll help you out and take the Diedrich. I'll pay shipping. Just tell me how
many poppers you want for it.
Experienced as we think we are in roasting, a change can set us back to
square one. You could start by trying to duplicate the popper profile on the
Diedrich; but I bet you can find a better profile than that given the many
posted here and on home-barista these last few weeks.
Please keep the reports coming. Including batch size. And especially your
cupping and tasting results.
On 1/24/07, Diablo  wrote:
<Snip>
--
MichaelB

3) From: miKe mcKoffee
You'll likely have much better profile control if you stick to not much =
more
than 1/2# batches. Local small espresso café/roaster has an IR3 (rated =
1 to
7# capacity). Phillip limits his standard batch size to 4# for just this
reason. Occasionally he'll do 5# batch and says control not as good. =
Never
does it's rated 7# batches, too flat a roast and nada profile control.
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I =
must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal =
enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone =
before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/	On 1/24/07, Diablo  wrote: 
		I have put maybe 20# of total greens through the machine
since last Thursday.
		Including the curing.  I have to say still that I am getting
to know the 
		machine very much.
		
		For as technical as this can be I still get a rough or semi
barbaric feel off
		the machine.  Only in the sense that one cannot program the
ramping and such,
		there is merely a knob with a low, medium and high setting
for the heat.  This 
		is adequit however.
		
		Hi, my name is Leo, I was on popcorn poppers for almost 2
years.  I'm trying to
		quit, but I feel like I have lost something in my roast.
		
		With the poppers I could get a decent, for a drip brew,
chocolate note from my 
		Dota Tarrazu.  They are gone now.  I'm a bit in a quandry as
to why.  For the
		method I used with poppers I had no temps and I could only
go by time since
		first, and start of a roll in second.  This would get me
good chocolate notes 
		in my Dota.
		
		Several things I have noticed, well at least variables aside
from other obvious
		facts.  The hot air from a popper is constant, whatever it
be.  Somewhere
		around 430^ to 450^ I suspect.  Depending on your total
footage of power 
		cords:)  This I think is one of the biggest reasons I have
lost the chocolate
		with the new roaster.  It's all in the ramping.  With
poppers the only ramping
		really is how fast or slow the beans absorb heat.  With this
roaster the temp 
		is ramped up slow enough that the temp of the roaster and
the beans are nearly
		identical.  I suspect this, no way really to know the truth
on that end without
		a TC inside the machine.  From what I can observe on the
outside the TC for the 
		roaster is in the bean mass towards the front end of the
machine.  Seems to be
		very accurate for actual bean temp.  First crack almost
cosistantly identical
		at 373^ every time.
		
		First and foremost, this roaster is consistant.  Last night
I made a run with 
		some Peru.  In 3 roasts, 2 of the roasts hit identical temps
at nearly all the
		30 second benchmarks.  I preheat to 400^, drop the beans
into the machine the
		instant it hits 400^ and from that point on at 30" intervals
my temp readings 
		were identical.  The 3rd roast was not spot on as the first
and second.  I
		suspect a bit of a chaff issue.  The collector seems to get
overfilled easily.
		As well the Peru seems to be fairly high on the chaff
content meter. 
		
		I started the night by not roasting my working roast
initally.  This because of
		the many times I have read that the first roast of the
session, like the first
		pancake on the griddle, is often off just a bit.  So I
decided to roast some 
		Dota for myself.  I tried to be extra careful and I stopped
the roast at the
		first snips of second, around 406^.  I have some great
florals in it today, and
		there wants to be a chocolate but it is not as prominant as
with, sniff sniff 
		sigh, my poppers.
		
		(for the Dota, and probably my other beans as well) Against
gut feelings I feel
		the next step is to dive into second crack and explore it.
This is all I can
		think is left to find those chocolate notes again.  Since I
suspect that the 
		temps of the poppers was in the neighborhood of 430^ to 450^
this would mean
		that starting of a rolling second would be up in those temps
or close to.  My
		roasts with the start of a second in the Diedrich have been
at 413^ and dump at 
		the start of a roll around 417^-420^.  This with the Dota
over the weekend.  I
		still have to try more of that batch as well.  I have not
revisited and cupped
		that roast since Sunday when I noted that the jar was
lacking the chocolate and 
		buttery aromas I have been used to.
		
		I was so used to the fast fast fast feeling from the
poppers.  The temps rose
		very fast and before you know it the roast is done at 8
minutes or so.  With
		the Diedrich my average roast time is somewhere around 16
minutes.  The temp 
		ramping is slow.  This is giving me that feeling of more of
a baked bean.  The
		difference again between the poppers and Diedrich seems to
be that the temps in
		the chamber for the popper at start of a roll in second
crack would be quite 
		higher.  Where in the Diedrich the temps are the temps, so
the start of a roll
		in second crack is not the same point roast-wise.  This is
all I can conclude.
		
		
		Just thought I'd put out a bit of an update on my findings
with the Diedrich. 
		Any input is appreciate and welcomed.  I am very impressed
with the machine and
		I can see that all I need is more time with it.  I have
already gotten to know
		it very well and I know before I know it things will be
quite second nature for 
		me.
		
		LR

4) From: Diablo
I roasted up some Sidamo, a 400g batch.  I took it into the start of second as
well, I had much luck at that spot in particular with all my roasts with the
popper.  I can say for this bean in particular, this roaster is a vast
improvement.  I would have times when it was cold that i could not get a decent
start of a roll in second crack with the poppers.  Here the Diedrich shines, as
it should.  The blueberry I'm getting, drip brew, at now 5 days rest is nearly
intense.  I never got such an intense Blueberry with the poppers.  
I cupped the Peru last night and it cupped well.  Borderline bright with
florals and a touch of chocolates.  Nothing very intense past the brightness of
the cup.  Will cup again tonight and tomorrow.  
Tonight I will cup the Peru and Dota Tarrazu again.  Will makes notes.
LR
--- MichaelB  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Diablo
Thank you Mike, I have been coming to that conclusion little by little.  My
initial roasts were with 450g.  Last night due to inconsistencies I thought
perhaps maxing out the roast batch was perhaps behind some of that.  Last night
I went to 400g roasts.  Part of the conclusion I was beginning to draw was
exactly as you noted, smaller batch sizes being more consistent.  
The only caveat I can think of that may play here is that the HR-1 is electric
and it was noted to me by the manufacturer that the initial heat sink of the
beans is more dramatic in the gas roasters than that of the electric.  The
heating elements retain heat so the drop is not as bad, but we're talking a
difference of maybe 20^ at the bottom of the curve.  Not such I big deal I
think when we're talking dropping to 215^ instead of 230^.  At that point it's
more of a time difference than anything else.  A difference nontheless though I
guess.  
LR
--- miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Aaron
I dont own a diedrich so cant help you there but if you get tired of it, 
Ill pay the postage and you can send it my way, Ill be more than happy 
to take the clunk off yer hands and give it a good home :)
Aaron

7) From: Diablo
:)  Anyone recall dumb and dumber?
So, what would you say the chances are of a guy like me and a girl like you
getting together?(somthing close to that)
Like, one in a million.
So, you're saying I have a chance!
One in a million would be on the generous side:)
LR
--- Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Aaron
Well actually, if ya did fall for that.. umm.. ya'd be more the girl. 
because ya'd be getting #$%$% royally!!  Hey, I had to try. you never 
know....
:)
Aaron

9) From: Brett Mason
#$%$% = "Taken"  no doubt....
On 1/24/07, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

10) From: Les
I am an RK roaster and I have roasted on a Diedrich before.  In my
experience, I would recommend going into second crack for about 15-20
seconds before cooling.  Second crack on a drum roaster isn't the same
as an air roaster.  You will find that you can ease into the city plus
- vienna much easier than with an air popper.   Just ease into second
for that chocolate flavor.  I would also recommend a higher chamber
tempature before adding the beans.  You have a wonderful roaster and
once you find the sweet spot you will be happy.  In my experience, the
sweet spot on CR beans are narrow compared to other beans.  It seems
as if air poppers have the ideal profile for the centrals.
Les
On 1/24/07, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Diablo
Thank you Les.  It hadn't, aside from knowing I could hit the sweet spot before
and not now, thought that the popper would have had a "better" profile in that
manor.  From sometimes spotty results and so on I assumed, though immensely
superior to anything store bought, the popper was kind of like using a hammer
to  kill a fly.  Well, just not the best tool for the task in any case.  Thanks
for the comments and knowledge.  I'll give a shot rolling second crack a bit
longer.  I suspect that when I find that spot I'll be able to pull the beans at
that same temp every time for that spot?  
To report on the CR from the past weekend which I recupped last night.  Fruity
and floral with the faintest chocolate notes, barely enough to be able to write
down in fact.  It was delicious still but almost ordinary, however a very clean
cup indeed.
Will cup the Peru from 2 nights ago tonight.  
LR
--- Les  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Robert Joslin
Leo
     I've been roasting with an HR-1 for almost a year and the transition
from another roaster  (3 years with a HotTop) has taken some time. To
interact intelligently with the machine you need to know how the variables
affect the roasting process and with so many variables to consider, nothing
but experimentation, close observation, and the keeping of good notes ( or a
roasting class at Sand Point) will be helpful.  The owners manual
certainly isn't.  I didn't know a damn thing about the machine when I
bougght it and I am just now beginning to have some confidence that I can
make it perform like I want.  I have produced some very good repeatable
roasts, but it will be nice to have someone else with whom I can compare
notes.  As you have noted, I find a remarkably narrow temp window for first
crack...the average of my last 24 roasts was 374 degrees (over a variety of
beans...almost  all wet processed.)  I think MiKe is right on about load
weight and it seems intuitive.  All other variables being constant, smaller
loads ramp/roast faster. I usually roast Centrals and some Africans and like
a roast time of 15 to 18 minutes which is why I use 460g loads. Smaller
loads finish up quite a bit faster, although I haven't found a 9 or 10 min
roast to be "bad", it just tastes different to me. In looking over my
time/temp logs it seems that drum air can have a dramatic effect on temp
ramp and the med and high heat controls have a surprisingly small effect.  I
usually preheat the drum to about 375 - 380 and the cooling effect of a 460g
load brings the temp down to the 250s range.  Temp reverses in about 1:30 to
2:30 and I usually turn heat up to med at around 3 or 4 mins, although
sometimes I will crank in high heat at this point.  The temp will ramp at
about 14 - 16 deg/min until cooling bin is closed and drum air switched on.
At 50% drum air the ramp falls to about 10 - 12 degs/min and as the temp
approaches 370, I switch in 100% drum air and go to high heat....just prior
to the beginning of first crack. I have varied this routine from time to
time, but usually as I dump the beans, there are a few crackles of 2nd  as
they land in the cooling tray.  I have about 5 pounds of Vietnamese Robusta
to experiment with and I am going to try to determine the temp ramp of the
high heat control (beans in at 400, heat to high, no changes in heat or drum
air until 2nd arrives...charting time/temp) and then repeat the roast,
engaging drum air early on while recording time/temp to assess the impact of
drum air on temp over the entire roast time.  My apologies for the long
post...might have been better off list but I ain't gonna retype it now!
Happy Roasting.  Keep us posted.               Josh
On 1/24/07, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Donn Milton
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Leo,
 
I've had the Diedrich almost a year now. I had started with the I-Roast,
moved to an SC/TO a few months later, and got the Diedrich about 6
months after that. At this rate, I'll be bankrupt in no time!
 
I got the initial version, when they called it the SR-1. But they then
sent me, at no cost, the redesigned drum and face plate (which
repositioned the temperature probe).
 
It's a great machine, and as you say, very consistent. As others have
noted with drum roasters, it does somewhat tone down slightly a bit of
the brightness one gets with air roasts, but to my taste, that's a good
thing!
 
While very consistent from roast to roast (particularly with the same
bean), I think the temperature readings are lower (but consistently
lower) than "reality". Depending on the bean, I hit first crack at 350 -
365 (~10-11 minutes), and second crack at 400 - 405 (~14-15 minutes).
These readings seem somewhat lower than what you report. Also, I
generally have been pre-heating to only 360-370, rather than your 400 (I
have no idea which is to be preferred-Diedrich gives a very wide range
in their manual).  I rarely take a roast past a few snaps of second, and
often stop well short of second. 
 
You mentioned the chaff issue. I think it's important to empty the chaff
collector after every roast, for consistency. As with the I-Roast
(despite very different technology), the more chaff in the collector,
the hotter it will be inside the roaster. I think that's why I've been
having less success with decafs (i.e., roasts taking too long)-in the
future I'll be sure to leave some chaff in before beginning a decaf
roast.
 
I think it's really important to record the profiles of all your roasts
as well as the times you change the temperature and air flow settings
(we both seem to have settled on recording every 30 seconds). Those
latter settings have a major effect on the shape of the profiles. In
particular, I find that if I go to "roasting drum air only" too soon,
the roast slows down too much.
 
I've done about 85 roasts so far (about 55 after the drum replacement,
and not counting "seasoning roasts"), and am still very much in the
learning mode. It's much easier to use than the SC/TO, roasts a lot more
than the I-Roast, and the coffee is really, really good (assuming SM
beans, of course!). The only drawbacks I see are the lag time of the
heaters, and the length of time (~20 min) to pre-heat. And, well, yes,
the price. But life is short.
 
Donn
 
 

14) From: Coffeenut
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Josh,
Please don't go off list for me.inquiring minds that at least dream of
owning a Diedrich want to know.
Rick  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Robert Joslin
Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2007 2:44 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Initial Notes on Diedrich HR-1, and other notes
My apologies for the long post...might have been better off list but I ain't
gonna retype it now!  Happy Roasting.  Keep us posted.               Josh 

15) From: Robert Joslin
Donn
     Its nice to find yet another Diedrich roaster!  How do you have your
machine vented?
Josh
On 1/25/07, Donn Milton  wrote:
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16) From: Eddie Dove
I too, really hope this conversation stays on-list.
Eddie
-- 
Errare humanun est - sed perseverare diabolicum
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/25/07, Robert Joslin  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/25/07, Robert Joslin  wrote:
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17) From: Robert Joslin
In conversation I can usually rely upon my wife to remind me when I am a
little to long in my explanations,  drift from the subject at hand, or need
to simply shut up.  If you will function in that capacity, then........
On 1/25/07, Coffeenut  wrote:
<Snip>

18) From: Michael Dhabolt
Robert and Josh,
Very informative thread,  the extended explanations are welcome.....please
keep them coming.
Mike (just plain)

19) From: Diablo
Interesting Don, for myself, I can say that since I was used to a darker more
chocolate note in my popper roasts that the move to the HR-1 has brought more
brightness.  For most part I roast for others who need that dark note, so it
would seem that that has been engrained into my style.  
I have noticed a few times that the slower ramp will have second crack start
sooner.  I'm not sure on that since I don't have enough time at the machine to
be able to put that together.  Since you noted a lower second crack temp that
brought that to mind.  I'll review my notes for the temp ramping in correlation
to start of second. 
The preheat, or bean drop, temp seems to have effect on the initial ramp and
time to first.  At 400^ the time to first crack is shorter since the beans soak
up as much heat as they can and the temp in the roaster has not been sapped to
almost a cold start temp.  From the point that the temp turns around to start
heating up again it seems a bit faster.  For my Sumatra I like this method
since I go to Viennese-French on that one.  
I do empty the chaff collecter every roast.  It's a must.  I cannot escape the
feeling of burning up my 5k machine home included.  Have even gone as far as a
few minutes into a roast and remembering, and still removing and cleaning the
collector during the roast.  Better a bad roast then a burnt domicle.  
I have the same kind of feeling for the heating elements.  They really struggle
to get with the program.  You figure when you turn the knob to High, you want
to see the temp gauge move, but it can be a while.  I believe here that a bit
of foresight is needed.  Roasts at this point will have to be planned out and
not just shoot from the hip making adjustments to the machine.  These machines
seem to have a built in lag time on purpose to prevent things like scorch or
the roast running away from you.  Slow and steady wins the race.
Will bring up the roasting drum air and air flow in reply to the other post
from our fellow HR-1 owner.  
LR
--- Donn Milton  wrote:
<Snip>

20) From: Diablo
I couldn't have worded your take on variables any better.  Not sure if perhaps
it's been overlooked by Diedrich or if they are cought up in the typical
business type go go go that some things get overlooked.  One of my first
thoughts when reading the manual, and looking at the diagram, was how does the
air actually flow.  To that effect, between the whole Cooling Bin and Drum Air,
in what manor do they impact the roast directly time and temp-wise.  Aside from
that I'd like to know the flow of air in a diagram that would help me
understand that impact.  Their directions are merely at 2 minutes to close the
bin and turn the Drum Air to 50%.  This says nothing of what is being changed
for the the temp and air.  Or what impact that is supposed to have.  (we'll get
along fine, I'm windy as well)  This kind of bugs me since there is no
description as to what that is supposed to do.  They sent me the manual when I
put the money up.  I read it a handfull of times.  It sucks.  Why beat around
that bush.  Though I can understand them wanting to appeal to a large base of
clientel so for them simple is good.  But for the most part anyone who is gonna
drop this kind of roll on a machine should be able to pull more out of their
manual.
One major note I had was trying to use the Low setting towards second.  If you
plan ahead I believe you can have the roast peak out right where you want it
with the low setting.  Thing being when I tried to slow a roast down, tried a
half pound for myself starting at 400^ at roast start, after a very fast ramp. 
I'll have to look at notes for temps and times, I want to say around 390^ I
switched to the low setting, but when it hit 413^ and a few snips began I
started to wait for the start of a roll after a few more degrees built up. 
After a few minutes right at 413^ the temp acutally backed off and I only got a
few snips of second there.  I dumped feeling so unsatisfied, but stronger for
the knowledge.  I think this wants to indicate that the low setting will only
hit so high altogether.  That lag time is something else though.  This also
says to me there is substantial heat mass inside the machine.  This would be
part of the reason there is lag time.  I want to say the actual heating
elements are small, encased in ceramic.  Either that or they have
electronically retarded/restrained the heating elements for those slow reaction
times.  I feel once harnessed this becomes a strong variable allowing you to
hit the marks you want.  Here is where a diagram or some kind of ramp chart
from them on their heating elements would be helpfull.  This would allow me to
say, that the low setting with bin closed and Drum Air at 50% gives you a
5^/min. ramp.  Anything similar to that would be awesome.  Also if they put in
that the low setting hits a max temp of 400^ this would be great.  This would
allow me to take that into consideration and adjust my roasts hitting times and
temps I want to hit.  Instead, it's going to take forever to get that nailed
down.  Maybe between the 3 of us we can dedicate some time to testing out the
settings and rampings.  Use a standard weight and we each take a different heat
setting.  Divide and conquer baby.  
Your experiment sounds great.  I was very nearly at that same point this past
weekend after trying out a smaller batch and just about nothing I did slowed it
down.  This became a frustration since that's the kind of thing you want to
have control of with a machine that costs so much. 
LR
--- Robert Joslin  wrote:
<Snip>

21) From: Diablo
I propose we use 400g and drop the beans at 375^.  We each take one setting of
the machine low medium and high.  Run those setting through the gambet of air
adjustements.  Not making any changes to the air through the entire roast. 
Exchange notes and then huddle again for perhaps another game plan.  
LR
--- Robert Joslin  wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: Robert Joslin
Am unclear on the air issue.  Start and complete a 400g roast at 375  with
cooling bin control handle up and air flow control handle up (just 20% air
flow through drum during entire roast? )  Probably should attempt to stop
roasts at approx. same point......beginning of 2nd, perhaps?  I'll try MED
heat.  Think it will be a short roast!!
Maybe tomorrow.  "Stuff" (thats everything else in life but coffee) has been
eating into my idle time.
On 1/27/07, Diablo  wrote:
<Snip>

23) From: Diablo
Ok, yeah, sorry.  A little unclear.  Meant that with 400g, and drop the beans
at 375^.  You taking medium now, I'll take high.  Leo Takes High, Rob Takes
Medium.  Only on left:)
From that point, what we can do it run maybe a couple to a few roasts in this
fashion;
Drop beans
Leave Drum Air at Cooling Bin Air, and the Cooling Bin in the Open Position. 
Run that all the way through end of second?
Leave Drum Air at Cooling Bin Air, and leave Cooling Bin in the 50% position.
Run that through end of second.
Basically change one air adjustment variable from the start of the roast and
run it all the way through to the end of second.  
Let me know how you'd like to fine tune it beyond that.  Mostly interested in
just dialing in the effects of each air adjustment against the Heat level.  
This should be fun
LR
--- Robert Joslin  wrote:
<Snip>


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