HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Electric burr grinder for press pots (18 msgs / 353 lines)
1) From: Jason Sheldon
I'm looking for recommendation for an electric burr grinder.  My main
brewing method is the presspot.  Experiences? positive or negative. I
just joined the mailing list.  Sorry if this topic has been talk to
death.
Thanks,
Jason

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
Welcome to the List!
The Solis Maestro Plus our host sells is a very ergonomically friendly
quality grinder for all but espresso, marginal for espresso. If you do much
espresso I'd go a Rocky or better.http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.electricmills.shtmlKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>

3) From: Rich M
Hi Jason-
I just bought a Rocky Rancillio grinder. My main method of brewing is  
french press, so I'll be able to tell you if there is a big  
difference between my trusty ol' blade grinder and the Rocky. From  
what I've been told, the grinder is arguably the most important  
component in the brewing process. Give me a week or so and I'll be  
able to give you the scoop on the Rocky.
Rich
On Jan 25, 2007, at 7:22 PM, Jason Sheldon wrote:
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4) From: Dan Kellgren
I'm 2 weeks into a brand new SMB from SM.  I'm a 80% press / 20% pour-over
(no espresso).  I am 110% satisfied.  ZERO regrets with this machine.  My
previous grinder was a $20 burr Mr. Coffee (aka JUNK).
I get VERY little powder on the course grind (press pot grind).  And I've
recently discovered a wonderful array of flavors with a fine grind and using
a pour-over pot.
Dan K
On 1/25/07, Jason Sheldon  wrote:
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5) From: Jason Sheldon
I should add that I'm currently using a Zassenhaus grinder.  She has
worked well for the last 5 years.  Lately, I have been getting a lot
of requests for my coffee.  Most of the people that are requesting the
coffee either has a blade grinder or no grinder.  So, I have been
doing a lot of grinding lately.
Cheers,
On 1/25/07, Jason Sheldon  wrote:
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6) From: Jared Andersson
I agree with Mike on this one.  The solis is a great nonespresso grinder.  I
have a Zass equivilant (PeDe) a Mazzer and a Solis Plus and if I did not do
the espresso thing I would pick the Solis first as a great cost versus
quality.  For a french press grind I actually prefer my solis to my Mazzer.
Jared
On 1/25/07, Jason Sheldon  wrote:
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7) From: Eddie Dove
Jason,
First of all, Welcome!
Second of all, don't make somebody else's problem yours ... unless they are
going to pay for it.  Are you giving them the coffee or selling it to them?
If you are giving it to them, tell them to buy the $20 Bodum C Mill from
Sweet Maria's and get yourself the SMP; otherwise, they may not enjoy your
coffee as much pre-ground.  If you are selling it to them and grinding a lot
of coffee, then I would suggest stepping up to the Rancilio Rocky for
durability & serviceability.
Yet another alternative is to use a cordless drill (at a slow speed) with
your Zass.
Eddie
-- 
Errare humanun est - sed perseverare diabolicum
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/25/07, Jason Sheldon  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/25/07, Jason Sheldon  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Errare humanun est - sed perseverare diabolicum
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

8) From: MichaelB
Jared,
You got me curious. What about the SMP is preferable to the Mazzer? The most
important criterion for me would be the taste of the coffee. Do you notice a
difference in taste? Or are there other factors that you prefer?
On 1/25/07, Jared Andersson  wrote:
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--
MichaelB

9) From: Jason Sheldon
Thanks for the welcome.
Lately, I have been sharing coffee with a couple of cow-orkers.  They
are crazy about coffee.  Unfortunately, work doesn't have a grinder.
Maybe, I should bring that up at the next staff meeting.  I have been
pre-grinding a few days worth of coffee.  I enjoy sharing the coffee
and talking about different characteristics of each batch.  An added
benefit is that I go through batches quicker so I get to try more
coffee.
On 1/25/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
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10) From: Dave
I use a "Capresso Infinity" It does a great job for all the less demanding
grinds I've done. I've never used it to make espresso, so I can't comment on
how well it does that.
Dave
On 1/25/07, Jason Sheldon  wrote:
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-- 
Dave
Some days, it's just not worth
chewing through the leather straps

11) From: Mike Garfias
Jason -
I had a cuisinart burr setup ($30 at costco) for awhile, and used it  
with a presspot.  Now I have a rocky and use it with the presspot.
There is a lot less mud in the cup now after switching to the rocky.
The cuisinart was better than nothing, but I can't believe I waited  
so long.
On Jan 25, 2007, at 6:22 PM, Jason Sheldon wrote:
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12) From: Brian Kamnetz
Mike,
In addition to less mud in the cup, did you notice any differences in flavor
characteristics when you switched to the Rocky?
Brian
On 1/26/07, Mike Garfias  wrote:
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13) From: Mike Garfias
I _THINK_ so, but that could have been the $285 talking and me  
wanting to think its better.
Then again, less mud means that there is a less silty taste, which I  
rather like.
On Jan 26, 2007, at 6:16 PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
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14) From: Jared Andersson
Sorry I missed your question back a few months.  I think the Mazzer is
really at its best in the espresso range and the solis is at its best in a
drip/press pot range.  The solis is a conical burr and the Mazzer is more of
a flat burr.  I don't know why this would matter but my experience is that
the solis does better at drip/press pot and the Mazzer has a great ability
to adjust in the espresso range.  I suspect that it is the conical versus
flat burr difference.  That being said I think the rocky I bought my mother
in law does a better job at espresso and drip/press than the solis but it
doesn't do espresso fine tuning as well as the Mazzer.  Fine tuning in
espresso is essential.  Jared
On 1/26/07, MichaelB  wrote:
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15) From: miKe mcKoffee
Maybe sort of the conical/flat burr difference but not really. The HIGH end
Mazzers used primarily in busy high volume espresso cafes use conical burrs,
big conical burrs! 
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jared Andersson
	Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2007 7:58 PM
	To: espressoperson
	
	Sorry I missed your question back a few months.  I think the Mazzer
is really at its best in the espresso range and the solis is at its best in
a drip/press pot range.  The solis is a conical burr and the Mazzer is more
of a flat burr.  I don't know why this would matter but my experience is
that the solis does better at drip/press pot and the Mazzer has a great
ability to adjust in the espresso range.  I suspect that it is the conical
versus flat burr difference.  That being said I think the rocky I bought my
mother in law does a better job at espresso and drip/press than the solis
but it doesn't do espresso fine tuning as well as the Mazzer.  Fine tuning
in espresso is essential.  Jared

16) From: raymanowen
If you look at a burr grinder, you may or may not realize that the design is
the evolution of two flat bastard files facing each other, set at an acute
angle to each other. The vertex of this angle does not exist physically; it
is only the line that is the intersection of the projection of the two file
planes.
The two files are identical but face each other head-to-toe. With one file
stationary and the other file moving in the cutting direction, anything
between the files gets shaved down to the size determined by the space
between the files.
The files are duplexed- at the smallest separation near the vertex, fine
pitch files are set; the coarse bastard files are set further out where the
separation is greatest.
Rather than have one file stationary and the other reciprocate, standard
practice is to arrange them in a circle so that one turns and one is
stationary. With rotating circular burrs, it is not possible to achieve
convergeance without the burrs' being conic sections.
If you have two rubber flat files set at an angle, you generate two cones if
you wrap them around two mandrels and maintain the angular relationship.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder with flat burrs? The fabricator is a magician- Get a refund!

17) From: Brian Kamnetz
Ray,
Another example of a post where I have no idea what you are saying, but
still love the elegance of your description.
Brian
On 4/4/07, raymanowen  wrote:
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18) From: Tom Ulmer
Rubber files work in my time-space-motion continuum...


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