HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Using the right amount of coffee in da brew (16 msgs / 371 lines)
1) From: Florida Randy
As a newbie I have what seems simple, yet confusing.  In Coffee
University's "Grind and Brewing for Maximum Quality it states, "The rule
is 2 level tablespoons for a 5-6 ounce cup."  In the description of the
SCAA Coffee Measure Scoop it states, "1 Level scoop approximates 7.25
grams coffee. Use 1 Scoop per 6-8 oz water".  It would seem by comparing
that 2 level tablespoons is slightly less than 1 SCAA scoop or 7.25
grams.  Using a gram conversion calculator I found online, however, it
states that 2 tablespoons is equal to 28.47 grams.
I know I've had enough coffee to be awake...but it hasn't helped the
confusion.
Clarifying thoughts appreciated.
Randy

2) From: Jason Turner
Great question.  I have the same issues.  Right now while brewing 48 oz of
water I use 12 tablespoons.  That is about the same for drip and french
press just different grinds.  Tastes good but it could be good to me but
"all wrong" to others.  I guess i need to get a small digital scale.
On 2/2/07, Florida Randy  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Jason Turner

3) From: Michael Dhabolt
Randy,
A lot of the conversion calculators and conversion rules are using
tablespoons of water for the conversion 'Weight' measure.  Makes it
impossible to convert to a considerably lighter substance such as ground
coffee.
Mike (just plain)

4) From: Dave
I guess I've been brewing mine a little strong then. I thought I read that
for SCAA to use 1 scoop (7.25g) per 4 oz cup of coffee. I've been using 35
grams of beans for a 20 oz pot/mug. I like it, but it seems strong even to
me. Maybe I'll try a little less next time.
-- 
Dave
Some days...
It's just not worth chewing through the leather straps
On 2/2/07, Florida Randy  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Kevin
To Michael's point, a table spoon is a volume measurement whereas gram
is a mass measurement.  In order to obtain an accurate measure between
the two measurement types (mass v. volume) one would need to know the
density of the material in question.  Additionally, for ground coffee
there would be void space (space in between grind particles filled
with air) in a tablespoon which would vary from bean to bean and grind
to grind.  The conversion is easy for water b/c there is no void space
and the density is well known (1gm per mL).  Long and short of it is
this particular conversion isn't worth it.  I use the SCAA scoop and
per 6 oz. water.
-- 
My home coffee roasting blog:http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/Kevin

6) From: Vicki Smith
I don't think there is an easy answer to this as it is a matter of 
individual taste, grind, and brewing method, at least to some extent. I 
start with a general guideline of 1.2-1.5 grams per ounce of water. In 
my 40 ounce KMB brewer, I end up using 55 grams of coffee. For an equal 
amount of coffee in my French Press, I use 63 grams of more coarsely 
ground coffee.
I also know that over time, my taste has changed, and I use more coffee 
per ounce of water than I used to.
Vicki

7) From: Rusty
I use one SCAA scoop and per 5 oz. water.
As most have said - what ever works for you.

8) From: Sandra Andina
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For an 8 "cup" (actually only a little more than a liter) Technivorm  
carafe, I grind 4-5 rounded Technivorm scoops (about the same size as  
SCAA scoops) of beans, grind for goldfilter,  and then dump it all  
into the filter without re-measuring or re-weighing.  Most times it's  
perfect, but sometimes I see people surreptitiously adding hot water  
to their cups. For press, I use the Bodum scoop (slightly smaller  
than SCAA), grind before measuring (I just eyeball the amt, of beans  
to grind), and use 1 scoop of coarse grounds per 5 oz. For Aeropress,  
I measure two level Aeropress scoops (slightly larger than SCAA) of  
beans for an 8-oz. mug's worth of finished diluted-concentrate brew  
and grind a little coarser than for goldfilter drip.
On Feb 2, 2007, at 1:39 PM, Vicki Smith wrote:
<Snip>
Sandra Andina
www.sandyandina.com
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For an 8 "cup" (actually only a =
little more than a liter) Technivorm carafe, I grind 4-5 rounded =
Technivorm scoops (about the same size as SCAA scoops) of beans, grind =
for goldfilter, and then dump it all into the filter without =
re-measuring or re-weighing. Most times it's perfect, but sometimes I =
see people surreptitiously adding hot water to their cups. For press, I =
use the Bodum scoop (slightly smaller than SCAA), grind before measuring =
(I just eyeball the amt, of beans to grind), and use 1 scoop of coarse =
grounds per 5 oz. For Aeropress, I measure two level Aeropress scoops =
(slightly larger than SCAA) of beans for an 8-oz. mug's worth of =
finished diluted-concentrate brew and grind a little coarser than for =
goldfilter drip.
On Feb 2, 2007, at 1:39 PM, Vicki Smith =
wrote:
I don't think there is an easy = answer to this as it is a matter of individual taste, grind, and brewing = method, at least to some extent. I start with a general guideline of = 1.2-1.5 grams per ounce of water. In my 40 ounce KMB brewer, I end up = using 55 grams of coffee. For an equal amount of coffee in my French = Press, I use 63 grams of more coarsely ground coffee. I also = know that over time, my taste has changed, and I use more coffee per = ounce of water than I used to. Vicki homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandra = Andinawww.sandyandina.com

= = --Apple-Mail-9-1012969413--

9) From: Florida Randy
Here's a great example of "the list at work".  Thanks to all who are
responding so quicly.
What motivated this post was a label I'm making for my roast and ground
coffee going to friends.  I suspected that an online calculator likely
had the problem of not knowing the material that was being used.  And,
for sure, I agree that each person's taste buds will dictate
modifications to any rule.
But, as a newbie, its important to me to have a logical "point of
beginning"....so keep your comments coming in.  I'll find my way
eventually.
Randy

10) From: Brian Kamnetz
I would recommend starting "strong" and then backing off if it is too
strong. Coffee that is brewed too thin, either because there is not enough
coffee grounds, or because the drip brewer doesn't produce water hot enough
to adequately extract coffee from grounds, is bitter.
Brian
On 2/2/07, Florida Randy  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: L. Michael Fraley, MD
Sandra,
That is exactly what I do for my Technivorm 8 "cup".  I like it, and I =
have not had people think it too strong.
Michael
On Feb 2, 2007, at 2:56 PM, Sandra Andina wrote:
For an 8 "cup" (actually only a little more than a liter) Technivorm 
carafe, I grind 4-5 rounded Technivorm scoops (about the same size as 
SCAA scoops) of beans, grind for goldfilter, and then dump it all =
into 
the filter without re-measuring or re-weighing. Most times it's 
perfect, but sometimes I see people surreptitiously adding hot water to =
their cups. For press, I use the Bodum scoop (slightly smaller than 
SCAA), grind before measuring (I just eyeball the amt, of beans to 
grind), and use 1 scoop of coarse grounds per 5 oz. For Aeropress, I 
measure two level Aeropress scoops (slightly larger than SCAA) of beans =
for an 8-oz. mug's worth of finished diluted-concentrate brew and grind =
a little coarser than for goldfilter drip.
On Feb 2, 2007, at 1:39 PM, Vicki Smith wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
Sandra Andina
www.sandyandina.com
L. Michael Fraley, MD=

12) From: an iconoclast
On 2/2/07, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
We use 60gms in our KMB, but fill the water past the top line.  I use about
28-30gms in my Aeropress for a 14 oz cup, but haven't tried Scott's inverted
felt method yet.  I made some coffee for my coworkers using one of those
pump pot filter things workplaces have.  My sister told me her packets for
those machines were 3 oz, so I took about 85 gms to make it stronger.
It looked so weak coming out the bottom of the filter holder, I ended up
double brewing by placing the filter with the already brewed grounds on
another pump pot and pumping in half the already brewed coffee to the filter
basket.  Then I took off the filter holder and pumped the rest of the once
brewed coffee into the twice brewed coffee.  It tasted pretty good.  I was
told by some of my coworkers who've tasted my Aeropress version, that I like
strong coffee.  I like intense coffee.  Most people get this intense taste
by buying overroasted beans.  Mine are perfectly roasted, but intense.  And
I can't bring my KMB to work.
Take care,
Ann
<Snip>
-- 
Sweet Maria's list searchable archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/index.htm

13) From: Vicki Smith
I had an interesting experience recently at my nephew Chris's house. He 
has recently started roasting, and his wife told me that although their 
coffee was very good, he couldn't seem to make it taste like mine. Now, 
they have a blade grinder and use a Cuisinart drip pot, so their coffee 
isn't going to taste exactly like mine, which is ground in a better 
grinder and brewed in a KMB.
However, I watched Chris make coffee, weighed his beans before he added 
it to his filter basket (something he had never done), and then, I made 
a second pot, in the same machine, with the same grinder, but I used 30% 
more beans by weight--even though I had to grind in two batches.
The difference was amazing. It was a real eye opener for them.
Now that I have the Rocky, I'm passing my Solis (fitted with brand new 
burrs) and I am giving Chris a digital scale. He'll have to track down a 
KMB all on his own.
v
an iconoclast wrote:
  > We use 60gms in our KMB, but fill the water past the top line.  I 
use about
<Snip>

14) From: Carole Zatz
On 2/2/07, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
I've had almost the exact experience at my sister-in-law's house.
(Cuisinart drip machine and blade grinder) Her coffee has always been
very erratic  one time sorta okay and the next time not at all good.
She' buys good beans from a local roaster so you can't blame that. Now
that I'm roasting coffee I always bring her some when I stop by. I
separate the beans into baggies of single full pot amounts. If I don't
do that, she'll always underestimate the amount to grind. I think a
lot of people feel that using more coffee equals bitter coffee. By
portioning it out, she's learning how to better judge the right amount
to use. I know she'll never use a scale but at least she's getting a
better idea of the volume needed.

15) From: Vicki Smith
I think part of the issue for my family was that the blade grinder 
really didn't hold enough coffee for a good full pot, so they over 
stuffed it, making a bad grind worse, and just didn't use enough.
v
Carole Zatz wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: Carole Zatz
On 2/3/07, Vicki Smith  wrote:
<Snip>
You're right, she has to do it in two batches. I forgot about that. I
remember it didn't make sense to her that one pot would require two
batches of grinds. My guess is that she still doesn't use enough
coffee when I'm not there!


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