HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Cafe Crema and Silvia (16 msgs / 889 lines)
1) From: Bob Szanto
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
After reading some recent posts on Cafe Crema I think it sounds like a 
drink I might enjoy.  Does anyone who's had experience making them with 
a Silvia have any tips or shortcuts to offer?  I always enjoy 
experimenting pulling shots in a different way...but I'd rather not have 
to "reinvent the wheel" here. My Silvia is of standard issue (no PID) 
and use a Rocky or Solis 166 grinder.  All of the machinery is about 4-5 
years old.  Zara Haimo recently wrote about pulling 5oz shots with a HX 
machine.  Anything special with a Silvia?
    * Is 5oz the magic number for this drink?
    * Do I still shoot for a 22-26 second pull?
    * Does anyone have a favorite bean for this drink?  I usually only
      have French Roast and Espresso on hand.
    * What do I want to avoid doing in preparing this drink?
Thanks,
Bob Szanto
Canal Fulton, OH
 

2) From: Rich Adams
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi Bob,  I thought I would pass this along as it was something that =
helped me.
From a post here some years ago where Jim Schulman said "HV knows how =
cafe crema is done."
Silvia not mentioned.
The full post can be found here:http://tinyurl.com/ytf7e6  Using the =
search option there you can find more posts.
"I'm not sure how all this works out on your gear, but I'd start with 
grinding coarser than you are for espresso (but much finer than drip) & =
aim 
for a short brew time - say 120 to 150ml in 18-ish seconds, or =
thereabouts. 
Like espresso, keep your eyes on the flow & cut the pump when the stream =
of 
crema gets too light. As said, it's a matter of trial & error; try it a =
few 
dozen times & sample each shot to assess the flavour (check for signs of =
overextraction). You'll mess up the first dozen (& get utterly wired), =
but 
eventually you'll get it down."
Rich Adams

3) From: Bob Szanto
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Rich,
I read the full post and and at least have an idea of how to approach it 
w/Silvia.
Thanks,
Bob
Rich Adams wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Silvia can make a true single basket 4 to 5oz Cafe' Crema OR use a double
basket for 4 to 5oz pull and add additonal 4 to 5oz hot water. I made them
the later way for years with Silvia calling 'em Cafe' Crema Americanos, and
make them that way still with the Bricoletta. Silvia's boiler can't keep
temp up enough for a double basket 8 to 10oz Cafe' Crema. 
 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Bob Szanto
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 7:44 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Cafe Crema and Silvia
Rich,
I read the full post and and at least have an idea of how to approach it
w/Silvia.
Thanks,
Bob
Rich Adams wrote: 
Hi Bob,  I thought I would pass this along as it was something that helped
me.
 
From a post here some years ago where Jim Schulman said "HV knows how cafe
crema is done."
 
Silvia not mentioned.
 
The full post can be found here:http://tinyurl.com/ytf7e6  Using the
search option there you can find more posts.
 
"I'm not sure how all this works out on your gear, but I'd start with 
grinding coarser than you are for espresso (but much finer than drip) & aim 
for a short brew time - say 120 to 150ml in 18-ish seconds, or thereabouts. 
Like espresso, keep your eyes on the flow & cut the pump when the stream of 
crema gets too light. As said, it's a matter of trial & error; try it a few 
dozen times & sample each shot to assess the flavour (check for signs of 
overextraction). You'll mess up the first dozen (& get utterly wired), but 
eventually you'll get it down."
 
Rich Adams

5) From: Craig Groendyk
Bob, 
I cannot claim to be a Cafe Crema aficionado (no experince with the real deal in Europe - only espressos in Europe and South America), however I have come to enjoy this cup as my favorite.  I have a Silvia (PID'd) / Rocky set up.  We have just enjoyed our first anniversary together.  I use exactly the same technique as I would for an espresso, but have adjusted the grind of my bean to allow me to pull about 5 ozs in 25 seconds.
I use fresh roasted coffee (was getting from a local roaster and have just started to roast my own).  I have had great experiences with PNG, a Guatemalan bean, Ethiopian Yirgacheffe and a few house blends (undisclosed to me at this point). Most beans have been roasted to FC or FC+.   The key to my enjoyment has been more linked to the freshness of the roast than the actual bean at this point.  I expect to refine my choices as I experiment with various beans and roast styles on my own.
I've been using a Bodum Pavina glass cup for the last several months and really enjoy seeing the amount of crema that forms.  I've been using the height of the crema as a "freshness" gauge on my beans.  
For me, it's a Cafe Crema's in the AM and espressos after lunch when I'm working at my home office.
Craig
<Snip>

6) From: Bob Szanto
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Mike,
That's the kind of info I was hoping for.  I'm assuming I follow the 
general instruction I've learned from other posts, i.e. use a grind 
coarser than that for espresso with a lighter tamp.  Any concern for the 
length of time the shot takes?
Thanks,
Bob
miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Bob Szanto
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Craig,
Between you, Rich, and Mike I think I've got enough basic info to give 
it a try.  Looking forward to some cafe cream tomorrow AM.  I'll post 
the results.
Thanks again,
Bob Szanto
Canal Fulton, OH
Craig Groendyk wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I pull 20 to 25 seconds for 4 to 5oz Cafe' Crema Americano pull. Don't worry
too much about going blond 'cuz it's gonna but rather go by the results in
the cup. This is NOT a normal espresso pull! Also, start your shot temp a
couple degrees f higher than you would normally for a standard shot
Americano. Temp will drop well below start of shot and the later part with
some blonding won't be bitter because of the lower temp.
 
miKe  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Bob Szanto
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 8:46 PM
Mike,
That's the kind of info I was hoping for.  I'm assuming I follow the general
instruction I've learned from other posts, i.e. use a grind coarser than
that for espresso with a lighter tamp.  Any concern for the length of time
the shot takes?
Thanks,
Bob
miKe mcKoffee wrote: 
Silvia can make a true single basket 4 to 5oz Cafe' Crema OR use a double
basket for 4 to 5oz pull and add additonal 4 to 5oz hot water. I made them
the later way for years with Silvia calling 'em Cafe' Crema Americanos, and
make them that way still with the Bricoletta. Silvia's boiler can't keep
temp up enough for a double basket 8 to 10oz Cafe' Crema. 
 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Bob Szanto
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 7:44 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Cafe Crema and Silvia
Rich,
I read the full post and and at least have an idea of how to approach it
w/Silvia.
Thanks,
Bob
Rich Adams wrote: 
Hi Bob,  I thought I would pass this along as it was something that helped
me.
 
From a post here some years ago where Jim Schulman said "HV knows how cafe
crema is done."
 
Silvia not mentioned.
 
The full post can be found here:http://tinyurl.com/ytf7e6  Using the
search option there you can find more posts.
 
"I'm not sure how all this works out on your gear, but I'd start with 
grinding coarser than you are for espresso (but much finer than drip) & aim 
for a short brew time - say 120 to 150ml in 18-ish seconds, or thereabouts. 
Like espresso, keep your eyes on the flow & cut the pump when the stream of 
crema gets too light. As said, it's a matter of trial & error; try it a few 
dozen times & sample each shot to assess the flavour (check for signs of 
overextraction). You'll mess up the first dozen (& get utterly wired), but 
eventually you'll get it down."
 
Rich Adams

9) From: Leo Zick
This is a multipart message in MIME format.
So, a café crema is a looooong lungo?
 
A 4-5 oz 20 second espresso pull sounds like an underextracted long =
watery
shot. Do you compensate with grind? Even then, with that much water, its
bound to get flat. I don’t think most machines can hold their temp =
profile
curves that long, can they?
 
 
From: miKe mcKoffee [mailto:mcKona] 
Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2007 1:31 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: RE: +Cafe Crema and Silvia
 
I pull 20 to 25 seconds for 4 to 5oz Cafe' Crema Americano pull. Don't =
worry
too much about going blond 'cuz it's gonna but rather go by the results =
in
the cup. This is NOT a normal espresso pull! Also, start your shot temp =
a
couple degrees f higher than you would normally for a standard shot
Americano. Temp will drop well below start of shot and the later part =
with
some blonding won't be bitter because of the lower temp.
 
miKe  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Bob Szanto
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 8:46 PM
Mike,
That's the kind of info I was hoping for.  I'm assuming I follow the =
general
instruction I've learned from other posts, i.e. use a grind coarser than
that for espresso with a lighter tamp.  Any concern for the length of =
time
the shot takes?
Thanks,
Bob
miKe mcKoffee wrote: 
Silvia can make a true single basket 4 to 5oz Cafe' Crema OR use a =
double
basket for 4 to 5oz pull and add additonal 4 to 5oz hot water. I made =
them
the later way for years with Silvia calling 'em Cafe' Crema Americanos, =
and
make them that way still with the Bricoletta. Silvia's boiler can't keep
temp up enough for a double basket 8 to 10oz Cafe' Crema. 
 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I =
must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal =
enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone =
before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Bob Szanto
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 7:44 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Cafe Crema and Silvia
Rich,
I read the full post and and at least have an idea of how to approach it
w/Silvia.
Thanks,
Bob
Rich Adams wrote: 
Hi Bob,  I thought I would pass this along as it was something that =
helped
me.
 
From a post here some years ago where Jim Schulman said "HV knows how =
cafe
crema is done."
 
Silvia not mentioned.
 
The full post can be found here:http://tinyurl.com/ytf7e6  Using the
search option there you can find more posts.
 
"I'm not sure how all this works out on your gear, but I'd start with 
grinding coarser than you are for espresso (but much finer than drip) & =
aim 
for a short brew time - say 120 to 150ml in 18-ish seconds, or =
thereabouts. 
Like espresso, keep your eyes on the flow & cut the pump when the stream =
of 
crema gets too light. As said, it's a matter of trial & error; try it a =
few 
dozen times & sample each shot to assess the flavour (check for signs of =
overextraction). You'll mess up the first dozen (& get utterly wired), =
but 
eventually you'll get it down."
 
Rich Adams

10) From: The Scarlet Wombat
I use an Isomac Zaffiro, but the Silvia should work about the same, minus 
the e61 head, of course.
Since the brewing temperature and pump pressure are more or less fixed, at 
least, they are on the Zaffiro, the variable is the grind.  You can make 
the grind so fine you get a restretto, or coarser to get a 5 or 6 ounce 
cafe crema type shot.  For me, the grind determines the pull volume as I do 
my best to tamp with the same pressure every time.  I try to get a 25 
second pull.  Since I cannot see t he stream of coffee coming out of the 
spout, the time is my guide.  If I grind ultra fine, 25 seconds produces a 
restretto, if I grind fairly coarsely, as the Super Jolly goes, I get a 
Cafe Crema of about 5.5  ounces.  Each of those takes the same length of 
time, about 25 seconds.  Using this method, I can get an entire spectrum of 
espresso-like drinks from the highly concentrated restretto to the more 
ordinary 8 ounce dilute Cafe Crema, all depends on the grind.
Dan, now, where's that Irish soda bread...

11) From: MichaelB
Dan,
There's another factor to consider with different volume shots. IIRC the
altdotcoffee crowd call it Al's rule. It relates to the finding
that the less water you run through a given amount of grinds, the less you
will extract. So for a ristretto you should be increasing the time to
compensate for the underextraction. Some professionals will pull ristrettos
at 35 seconds or more. And vice versa; for a lungo you should be shortening
the time to avoid overextraction.
It's not clear whether a cafe crema is on that same continuum but from what
I've read and what I have tried and tasted I would go for a faster time than
the golden rule. For anyone trying to perfect the drink, defintely consider
time one of the variables to play with to find what works best for your
equipment and your taste.
On 2/10/07, The Scarlet Wombat  wrote:
<Snip>
--
MichaelB

12) From: MichaelB
miKe,
The advice of starting high to avoid going too low reminds reminds me of the
that old statistician's joke. Three of them went duck hunting. One shot and
missed a foot over the duck's head. The other missed a foot under. The third
statistician watched and yelled out "You hit it!" So on the one hand you may
have the right average temperature; on the other hand you may have a shot
that is degraded by two factors, temp too hot and temp too cool. Anyway,
this shouldn't stop anybody from trying cafe cremas. They're fun to make and
drink.
On 2/10/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
--
MichaelB

13) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Agreed, lower volume shot longer pull, higher volume shorter pull. A double
basket 1oz ristretto pull I target 35 to 40 seconds. Drinking a quite tasty
not bitter at all double basket 24sec 4.5oz pull plus 5oz hot water Cafe'
Crema Americano Kona Hula Daddy as I type.
 
Intra-shot temp is going to be a factor too in Cafe' Crema shot length i
believe. With HX Bricoletta I started the above shot 206f and by the end of
pull  E61 Group in thermosypho down to ~196f. (Installed Eric's E61 digital
thermometer adapter two days ago.) With a double boiler machine like Brewtus
or Vivaldi I highly suspect you'd need to use shorter pull time because of
them maintaining tighter intra-shot temp on long pull.
 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of MichaelB
Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2007 6:40 AM
Dan,
 
There's another factor to consider with different volume shots. IIRC the
altdotcoffee crowd call it Al's rule. It relates to the finding that the
less water you run through a given amount of grinds, the less you will
extract. So for a ristretto you should be increasing the time to compensate
for the underextraction. Some professionals will pull ristrettos at 35
seconds or more. And vice versa; for a lungo you should be shortening the
time to avoid overextraction. 
 
It's not clear whether a cafe crema is on that same continuum but from what
I've read and what I have tried and tasted I would go for a faster time than
the golden rule. For anyone trying to perfect the drink, defintely consider
time one of the variables to play with to find what works best for your
equipment and your taste. 
On 2/10/07, The Scarlet Wombat  wrote: 
I use an Isomac Zaffiro, but the Silvia should work about the same, minus
the e61 head, of course.
Since the brewing temperature and pump pressure are more or less fixed, at
least, they are on the Zaffiro, the variable is the grind.  You can make
the grind so fine you get a restretto, or coarser to get a 5 or 6 ounce 
cafe crema type shot.  For me, the grind determines the pull volume as I do
my best to tamp with the same pressure every time.  I try to get a 25
second pull.  Since I cannot see t he stream of coffee coming out of the 
spout, the time is my guide.  If I grind ultra fine, 25 seconds produces a
restretto, if I grind fairly coarsely, as the Super Jolly goes, I get a
Cafe Crema of about 5.5  ounces.  Each of those takes the same length of 
time, about 25 seconds.  Using this method, I can get an entire spectrum of
espresso-like drinks from the highly concentrated restretto to the more
ordinary 8 ounce dilute Cafe Crema, all depends on the grind.
Dan, now, where's that Irish soda bread...--
MichaelB 

14) From: Leo Zick
This is a multipart message in MIME format.
Ristrettos can be time based or volume based. i prefer longer times over
shorter, and finer grinds.
From: MichaelB [mailto:espressoperson] 
Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2007 9:40 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Cafe Crema and Silvia
Dan,
There's another factor to consider with different volume shots. IIRC the
altdotcoffee crowd call it Al's rule. It relates to the finding that the
less water you run through a given amount of grinds, the less you will
extract. So for a ristretto you should be increasing the time to compensate
for the underextraction. Some professionals will pull ristrettos at 35
seconds or more. And vice versa; for a lungo you should be shortening the
time to avoid overextraction. 
It's not clear whether a cafe crema is on that same continuum but from what
I've read and what I have tried and tasted I would go for a faster time than
the golden rule. For anyone trying to perfect the drink, defintely consider
time one of the variables to play with to find what works best for your
equipment and your taste. 
On 2/10/07, The Scarlet Wombat  wrote: 
I use an Isomac Zaffiro, but the Silvia should work about the same, minus
the e61 head, of course.
Since the brewing temperature and pump pressure are more or less fixed, at
least, they are on the Zaffiro, the variable is the grind.  You can make
the grind so fine you get a restretto, or coarser to get a 5 or 6 ounce 
cafe crema type shot.  For me, the grind determines the pull volume as I do
my best to tamp with the same pressure every time.  I try to get a 25
second pull.  Since I cannot see t he stream of coffee coming out of the 
spout, the time is my guide.  If I grind ultra fine, 25 seconds produces a
restretto, if I grind fairly coarsely, as the Super Jolly goes, I get a
Cafe Crema of about 5.5  ounces.  Each of those takes the same length of 
time, about 25 seconds.  Using this method, I can get an entire spectrum of
espresso-like drinks from the highly concentrated restretto to the more
ordinary 8 ounce dilute Cafe Crema, all depends on the grind.
Dan, now, where's that Irish soda bread...--
MichaelB 

15) From: Tom Ulmer
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Herein lies the reason I believe a levered machine is superior for low
volume use. With a pump machine you're completely dependant on your grind to
accomplish the right time target.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of miKe mcKoffee
Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2007 10:09 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: RE: +Cafe Crema and Silvia
Agreed, lower volume shot longer pull, higher volume shorter pull. A double
basket 1oz ristretto pull I target 35 to 40 seconds. Drinking a quite tasty
not bitter at all double basket 24sec 4.5oz pull plus 5oz hot water Cafe'
Crema Americano Kona Hula Daddy as I type.
Intra-shot temp is going to be a factor too in Cafe' Crema shot length i
believe. With HX Bricoletta I started the above shot 206f and by the end of
pull  E61 Group in thermosypho down to ~196f. (Installed Eric's E61 digital
thermometer adapter two days ago.) With a double boiler machine like Brewtus
or Vivaldi I highly suspect you'd need to use shorter pull time because of
them maintaining tighter intra-shot temp on long pull.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of MichaelB
Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2007 6:40 AM
Dan,
There's another factor to consider with different volume shots. IIRC the
altdotcoffee crowd call it Al's rule. It relates to the finding that the
less water you run through a given amount of grinds, the less you will
extract. So for a ristretto you should be increasing the time to compensate
for the underextraction. Some professionals will pull ristrettos at 35
seconds or more. And vice versa; for a lungo you should be shortening the
time to avoid overextraction. 
It's not clear whether a cafe crema is on that same continuum but from what
I've read and what I have tried and tasted I would go for a faster time than
the golden rule. For anyone trying to perfect the drink, defintely consider
time one of the variables to play with to find what works best for your
equipment and your taste. 
On 2/10/07, The Scarlet Wombat  wrote: 
I use an Isomac Zaffiro, but the Silvia should work about the same, minus
the e61 head, of course.
Since the brewing temperature and pump pressure are more or less fixed, at
least, they are on the Zaffiro, the variable is the grind.  You can make
the grind so fine you get a restretto, or coarser to get a 5 or 6 ounce 
cafe crema type shot.  For me, the grind determines the pull volume as I do
my best to tamp with the same pressure every time.  I try to get a 25
second pull.  Since I cannot see t he stream of coffee coming out of the 
spout, the time is my guide.  If I grind ultra fine, 25 seconds produces a
restretto, if I grind fairly coarsely, as the Super Jolly goes, I get a
Cafe Crema of about 5.5  ounces.  Each of those takes the same length of 
time, about 25 seconds.  Using this method, I can get an entire spectrum of
espresso-like drinks from the highly concentrated restretto to the more
ordinary 8 ounce dilute Cafe Crema, all depends on the grind.
Dan, now, where's that Irish soda bread...--
MichaelB 

16) From: Mark J Bergh
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
MichaelB,
 
Very good analogy and a point well taken!
I had a suspicion that there would be a temperature gradient along that long
of a pull but was unsure of whether it would all average out.
 
Mark  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of MichaelB
Sent: Saturday, February 10, 2007 6:59 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Cafe Crema and Silvia
miKe,
 
The advice of starting high to avoid going too low reminds reminds me of the
that old statistician's joke. Three of them went duck hunting. One shot and
missed a foot over the duck's head. The other missed a foot under. The third
statistician watched and yelled out "You hit it!" So on the one hand you may
have the right average temperature; on the other hand you may have a shot
that is degraded by two factors, temp too hot and temp too cool. Anyway,
this shouldn't stop anybody from trying cafe cremas. They're fun to make and
drink. 
On 2/10/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote: 
I pull 20 to 25 seconds for 4 to 5oz Cafe' Crema Americano pull. Don't worry
too much about going blond 'cuz it's gonna but rather go by the results in
the cup. This is NOT a normal espresso pull! Also, start your shot temp a
couple degrees f higher than you would normally for a standard shot
Americano. Temp will drop well below start of shot and the later part with
some blonding won't be bitter because of the lower temp. 
 
miKe  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Bob Szanto
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 8:46 PM
Mike,
That's the kind of info I was hoping for.  I'm assuming I follow the general
instruction I've learned from other posts, i.e. use a grind coarser than
that for espresso with a lighter tamp.  Any concern for the length of time
the shot takes? 
Thanks,
Bob
miKe mcKoffee wrote: 
Silvia can make a true single basket 4 to 5oz Cafe' Crema OR use a double
basket for 4 to 5oz pull and add additonal 4 to 5oz hot water. I made them
the later way for years with Silvia calling 'em Cafe' Crema Americanos, and
make them that way still with the Bricoletta. Silvia's boiler can't keep
temp up enough for a double basket 8 to 10oz Cafe' Crema. 
 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin [
mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Bob Szanto
Sent: Friday, February 09, 2007 7:44 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Cafe Crema and Silvia
Rich,
I read the full post and and at least have an idea of how to approach it
w/Silvia.
Thanks,
Bob
Rich Adams wrote: 
Hi Bob,  I thought I would pass this along as it was something that helped
me.
 
From a post here some years ago where Jim Schulman said "HV knows how cafe
crema is done."
 
Silvia not mentioned.
 
The full post can be found here:http://tinyurl.com/ytf7e6  Using the
search option there you can find more posts. 
 
"I'm not sure how all this works out on your gear, but I'd start with 
grinding coarser than you are for espresso (but much finer than drip) & aim 
for a short brew time - say 120 to 150ml in 18-ish seconds, or thereabouts. 
Like espresso, keep your eyes on the flow & cut the pump when the stream of 
crema gets too light. As said, it's a matter of trial & error; try it a few 
dozen times & sample each shot to assess the flavour (check for signs of 
overextraction). You'll mess up the first dozen (& get utterly wired), but 
eventually you'll get it down."
 
Rich Adams


HomeRoast Digest