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Topic: an extra 150 watts (4 msgs / 129 lines)
1) From: Peter Zulkowski
My kill-a-watt finally came,
because I finally ordered it.
This only took a bit over a year.
Honestly, I was happy with the results I WAS getting, but now I am back 
on my quest to see how much I can roast with 1500 Watts.
When I hooked it up to my PGR, which was doing just fine with about 600 
grams, it only measured about 1350 Watts being used by the 1475 Watt 
turbo oven.
The bread machine draws 79 watts btw.
All this was connected to a power strip with about a 12' long cord on it.
So I plugged the watt meter directly into my special 20 amp circuit, 
that I wired with 10 gage wire, with the receptical  about 3 feet from 
the breaker box.
Now the TO draws 1500 Watts!
No more power strip with all that extra cord.
This increase is not really surprising since I gutted all the stock 
wires and timers and switches and connected the heating element directly
to a length of 10 gage wire that plugs right in to a switch box.
It should draw more than the label says it will, and it does :)
The internal cooling fan for the Turbo Oven is on another separate 
circuit, which is also switched.
The temperature of the PGR now climbs faster during preheat.. about 3 
degrees F per second now, or maybe a bit quicker.
It had been climbing at about a degree per second.
Now to test it..
I guess I was motivated by Tom's email that said that decaf does not 
last as long as regular greens in storage.
Well, I had a Kilogram of decaf Harrar left over from over a year ago.
May as well try that.
I pre heated to 450 F and dumped in the beans.
Not as good a mixing motion as I would like to see but this is doable.
You can tell that it is a struggle with 1500 Watts.
It seemed to take forever to just get up to 350 F.
Although the temperature ramp was steady, first crack did not start 
until 8 minutes into the roast!
Yup, I had to switch off the power so I could delay between first and 
second, and as is usual when I roast decaf, I got shiny oily beans
and seemed to roast too dark :(
The roast is very even though :)
Roast time was thirteen minutes :)
Oh my, this is a LOT of beans to cool with just a hair dryer :(
I split the batch and cooled half at a time.
Next on my list to do is to make a bean cooler!
Is aluminum screening okay to use in one?
PeterZ
PGR = Pretty Good Roaster, here in LHC (Lake Havasu City, AZ)
<Snip>

2) From: raymanowen
"Is aluminum screening okay to use in one?"
How about you hit Target for one of the 11 inch diameter ss screen colanders?
I used 36 inch wide Al screen wire for the conveyor belt in a screen
printing ink curing dryer I built once. It moved printed garments
through an IR/ convection air heat tunnel. It was totally supported,
otherwise it would have sagged like a hammock.
Aluminum is too soft, I think.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Do not use if you are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. Ask
your Cupper if it's right for you, and let your Cupper know of any
other roasting equipment you may be using...
On 2/12/07, Peter Zulkowski  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the
Mighty Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

3) From: Alchemist John
That is great.  For comparison, etc, I roast on around 2000 watts and 
my largest batch to date was 38 oz.  2 lbs of finished coffee.  Like 
you said, that is a lot of coffee to cool with a blow drier.
I wouldn't fret about 1st not starting until 8 minutes.  My 
"standard" roast profile often doesn't have 1st until 9-10 
minutes.  And it is not for lack of power, it is where I like 
it.  That 38 oz roast was 9-10 minutes first and 15 min EOR.  And I 
REALLY had to throttle the power back just before 1st.  2+ lbs of 
beans have a lot of momentum (in comparison to a few ounces that is).
Congrats again.
At 14:11 2/12/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

4) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
The real power input is a valuable piece of data. I have used a Kill-a-Watt
for several years. But depending on your roaster setup, the input voltage or
voltage drop of a control circuit is almost as good. The real power input
will immediately show connection and wiring problems as you have seen.
In my roaster there are switched full power heaters and voltage controlled
heaters. The total power is more useful since line voltage is variable. The
controls allow me to manually adjust total power input of all the heaters
based on previous experience to closely follow the desired profile.
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