HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Intriguing Lesson: Roast Profiles (8 msgs / 327 lines)
1) From: Eddie Dove
At least to me anyway ...
I was doing a test of 4 different profiles of the same bean, Ethiopia
Organic Idido Misty Valley DP.  One of the batches (Batch # 4), showed
promise at the outset and by day 3 took a commanding lead in flavor; on the
7th-8th day it was an absolutely exquisite elixir.  Another batch (Batch #
3), however, was an abysmal bore throughout the cuppings.  The profile
wasn't vastly different, which puzzled me.
Today, running low on roasted coffee, I had just enough of the abysmal bore
Batch # 3 to make a 2nd pot of coffee for the day; the Blue Lintong has been
fantastic!  I really didn't have much hope for it being a great coffee.  I
knew it would be mediocre so instead of my standard Swissgold filter I used
a paper filter (white Melitta Flavor Pore)..  After brewing, I poured a cup
and did the usual filling of my nose with the aroma ... this smells
familiar.  Once the cup cooled a bit, it tasted almost identical to the
other batch that I loved so much.
The thing that boggles my mind is that it took 12 days of rest to get to
this point.  I do not understand this and if anyone can shed some light on
it, I would greatly appreciate it.  Nevetheless, I thought I would share.
Respectfully,
Eddie
-- 
Errare humanun est - sed perseverare diabolicum
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

2) From: Leo Zick
This is a multipart message in MIME format.
You said the beans were the same,but then said batch 3 was blue lintong and
batch 4 was misty valley. Which is which?
Hard to say why they are different, esp since you didn't share profiles for
either batch :p
Btw, I like some coffees with longer rests. Many scoff at anything older
than 7 days, but I find my older coffees when returning from out of town,
have a mellow blended flavor to them
From: Eddie Dove [mailto:southcoastcoffeeroaster] 
Sent: Tuesday, February 20, 2007 7:32 PM
To: Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting Mailing List
Subject: +Intriguing Lesson: Roast Profiles
At least to me anyway ...
I was doing a test of 4 different profiles of the same bean, Ethiopia
Organic Idido Misty Valley DP.  One of the batches (Batch # 4), showed
promise at the outset and by day 3 took a commanding lead in flavor; on the
7th-8th day it was an absolutely exquisite elixir.  Another batch (Batch #
3), however, was an abysmal bore throughout the cuppings.  The profile
wasn't vastly different, which puzzled me. 
Today, running low on roasted coffee, I had just enough of the abysmal bore
Batch # 3 to make a 2nd pot of coffee for the day; the Blue Lintong has been
fantastic!  I really didn't have much hope for it being a great coffee.  I
knew it would be mediocre so instead of my standard Swissgold filter I used
a paper filter (white Melitta Flavor Pore)..  After brewing, I poured a cup
and did the usual filling of my nose with the aroma ... this smells
familiar.  Once the cup cooled a bit, it tasted almost identical to the
other batch that I loved so much.  
The thing that boggles my mind is that it took 12 days of rest to get to
this point.  I do not understand this and if anyone can shed some light on
it, I would greatly appreciate it.  Nevetheless, I thought I would share. 
Respectfully,
Eddie
-- 
Errare humanun est - sed perseverare diabolicum
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

3) From: Eddie Dove
The Blue Lintong was the first pot of coffee for the day and I used "Batch #
3 to make the 2nd pot of coffee for the day".  What intrigued me was the
fact that Batch # 3 took until day 12 to reach the same plateau that the
Batch # 4 reached in 7 days with an almost identical flavor.  All four
batches were 226 grams and were roasted in a Gene Cafe.  The profiles are
below.
Batch # 3 Profile:
300 F for 5:00 minutes - total elapsed time: 5:00
435 F for 4:00 minutes - total elapsed time: 9:00
1st crack at 12:50
482 F for 4:15 minutes - total elapsed time: 13:15
460 F for 2:15 minutes - total elapsed time: 15:30
Roast terminated at 15:30 and cooled on a fan
Batch # 4 Profile:
300 F for 5:00 minutes - total elapsed time: 5:00
435 F for 4:00 minutes - total elapsed time: 9:00
460 F for 2:00 minutes - total elapsed time: 11:00
482 F for 5:00 minutes - total elapsed time: 13:00
1st crack at 13:00
Roast terminated at 16:00 and cooled on a fan
Eddie
-- 
Errare humanun est - sed perseverare diabolicum
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 2/20/07, Leo Zick  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 2/20/07, Leo Zick  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 2/20/07, Leo Zick  wrote:
<Snip>
Just last week I had a batch of Misty Valley that had lasted longer than
usual. I think it was around 9 days that it suddenly took off...
Brian

5) From: Leo Zick
This is a multipart message in MIME format.
Do you hit SC at 482?  Why do you go hotter then cooler, to 460? What does
this do during roasting?
From: Eddie Dove [mailto:southcoastcoffeeroaster] 
Sent: Tuesday, February 20, 2007 8:51 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Intriguing Lesson: Roast Profiles
The Blue Lintong was the first pot of coffee for the day and I used "Batch #
3 to make the 2nd pot of coffee for the day".  What intrigued me was the
fact that Batch # 3 took until day 12 to reach the same plateau that the
Batch # 4 reached in 7 days with an almost identical flavor.  All four
batches were 226 grams and were roasted in a Gene Cafe.  The profiles are
below. 
Batch # 3 Profile:   
300 F for 5:00 minutes - total elapsed time: 5:00
435 F for 4:00 minutes - total elapsed time: 9:00
1st crack at 12:50
482 F for 4:15 minutes - total elapsed time: 13:15
460 F for 2:15 minutes - total elapsed time: 15:30 
Roast terminated at 15:30 and cooled on a fan
Batch # 4 Profile:   
300 F for 5:00 minutes - total elapsed time: 5:00
435 F for 4:00 minutes - total elapsed time: 9:00
460 F for 2:00 minutes - total elapsed time: 11:00
482 F for 5:00 minutes - total elapsed time: 13:00
1st crack at 13:00
Roast terminated at 16:00 and cooled on a fan
Eddie
-- 
Errare humanun est - sed perseverare diabolicum
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
On 2/20/07, Leo Zick  wrote:
You said the beans were the same,but then said batch 3 was blue lintong and
batch 4 was misty valley. Which is which?
Hard to say why they are different, esp since you didn't share profiles for
either batch :p
Btw, I like some coffees with longer rests. Many scoff at anything older
than 7 days, but I find my older coffees when returning from out of town,
have a mellow blended flavor to them
From: Eddie Dove [mailto:southcoastcoffeeroaster] 
Sent: Tuesday, February 20, 2007 7:32 PM
To: Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting Mailing List
Subject: +Intriguing Lesson: Roast Profiles
At least to me anyway ...
I was doing a test of 4 different profiles of the same bean, Ethiopia
Organic Idido Misty Valley DP.  One of the batches (Batch # 4), showed
promise at the outset and by day 3 took a commanding lead in flavor; on the
7th-8th day it was an absolutely exquisite elixir.  Another batch (Batch #
3), however, was an abysmal bore throughout the cuppings.  The profile
wasn't vastly different, which puzzled me. 
Today, running low on roasted coffee, I had just enough of the abysmal bore
Batch # 3 to make a 2nd pot of coffee for the day; the Blue Lintong has been
fantastic!  I really didn't have much hope for it being a great coffee.  I
knew it would be mediocre so instead of my standard Swissgold filter I used
a paper filter (white Melitta Flavor Pore)..  After brewing, I poured a cup
and did the usual filling of my nose with the aroma ... this smells
familiar.  Once the cup cooled a bit, it tasted almost identical to the
other batch that I loved so much.  
The thing that boggles my mind is that it took 12 days of rest to get to
this point.  I do not understand this and if anyone can shed some light on
it, I would greatly appreciate it.  Nevetheless, I thought I would share. 
Respectfully,
Eddie
-- 
Errare humanun est - sed perseverare diabolicum
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

6) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
There could be sizeable differences between the profiles that are not
indicated by the set temperatures. The timing of the heater on/off cycles
may have made the roast 3 drum (bean) temperature either overshoot the set
temperature or even cause it to fall during first. Roast 4 has a better
chance of creating a smooth drum temperature profile.
This would explain immediate taste differences but not that of the peak
flavor resting response. Are you sure that there are no differences between
starting conditions or cooling/storage? Describe your storage method.
In one out of every 15 to 20 roasts in my drum (not a GC), I get unusually
mild or weak flavors that improve quickly by rest day 3. All of my roasts
have peak flavor after 2 or 3 days and remain stable for the next three to
four weeks.
--

7) From: Eddie Dove
Hey Ken,
Both were started the same way; Batch # 4 immediately after Batch # 3, which
was immediately after Batch # 2.  The roaster was not allowed to cool
between roasts.  They were cooled in the same manner as well; atop a
Wearever Cushionaire Pizza Pan that was atop a fan and oriented such that
the down draft cooled the beans.  All were placed in mason jars with
degassing valves in the lids and then later vacuum sealed in the mason jar.
All kept in the same dark coffee cabinet.
Leo,
I will run the roaster up to 482 for the roast that I want to accentuate the
brightness, but I did not want these roasts to go into 2nd crack because I
was shooting for City+ roasts.  On many of the profiles I have been working
with, I dial back the temperature at 1st crack, which lengthens the time
between 1st and 2nd crack giving the roast more time to develop and me a
chance to pick where I want the roast to end (City, City+, etc) based on
time and smell.
Eddie
-- 
Errare humanun est - sed perseverare diabolicum
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 2/21/07, Ken Mary  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 2/21/07, Ken Mary  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Leo Zick
This is a multipart message in MIME format.
Interesting! I didn't know more heat would accentuate brightness. Ive been
going the other way as far as time b/t fc and sc. As soon as fc starts, I
throw the heat to full on the TO, and let sc follow right behind. There is
normally a 2min gap. This really seems to smooth out the flavors.  I think
ill try going the other way again, a longer 5 min gap, and see what
happens..
From: Eddie Dove [mailto:southcoastcoffeeroaster] 
Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2007 8:48 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Intriguing Lesson: Roast Profiles
Hey Ken,
Both were started the same way; Batch # 4 immediately after Batch # 3, which
was immediately after Batch # 2.  The roaster was not allowed to cool
between roasts.  They were cooled in the same manner as well; atop a
Wearever Cushionaire Pizza Pan that was atop a fan and oriented such that
the down draft cooled the beans.  All were placed in mason jars with
degassing valves in the lids and then later vacuum sealed in the mason jar.
All kept in the same dark coffee cabinet. 
Leo,
I will run the roaster up to 482 for the roast that I want to accentuate the
brightness, but I did not want these roasts to go into 2nd crack because I
was shooting for City+ roasts.  On many of the profiles I have been working
with, I dial back the temperature at 1st crack, which lengthens the time
between 1st and 2nd crack giving the roast more time to develop and me a
chance to pick where I want the roast to end (City, City+, etc) based on
time and smell.  
Eddie
-- 
Errare humanun est - sed perseverare diabolicum
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
On 2/21/07, Ken Mary  wrote:
<Snip>
There could be sizeable differences between the profiles that are not 
indicated by the set temperatures. The timing of the heater on/off cycles
may have made the roast 3 drum (bean) temperature either overshoot the set
temperature or even cause it to fall during first. Roast 4 has a better 
chance of creating a smooth drum temperature profile.
This would explain immediate taste differences but not that of the peak
flavor resting response. Are you sure that there are no differences between
starting conditions or cooling/storage? Describe your storage method. 
In one out of every 15 to 20 roasts in my drum (not a GC), I get unusually
mild or weak flavors that improve quickly by rest day 3. All of my roasts
have peak flavor after 2 or 3 days and remain stable for the next three to 
four weeks.


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