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Topic: =?Windows-1252?Q?Re:_Gaggia_+_Rocky_on_the_way_=96_what_coffee_to_try_fir?= (3 msgs / 148 lines)
1) From: Barry Luterman
Usually beans should rest one or two days longer for espresso than drip. But 
it's not a hard and fast rule.

2) From: Ross
Carole,
I got the doser model before they came out with the non doser, it's not that 
bad, it has two advantages: You can turn the doser machine on and let it 
grind while you get filters or run your blank shot ect. instead of having to 
stand there with your finger on the switch and it's easier to clean the 
chute after each days run.  First thing - do the mods, you can get exact 
instructions with a google search, or just get a screw driver and remove the 
fork from the bottom, remove the finger guard from the bean hopper and cover 
the screw slots with some scotch tape, take the doser apart and put some 
electrical tape on the bottom and ends of the blades so they sweep the doser 
clean.  I also removed the metal plate from the doser chamber just to make 
it easer to dose all grinds and clean out, that may be over kill because 
once you do that it is no longer a doser and it may throw a few grinds out 
when it really gets going.  I pre measure the beans for each grind so when 
it's done grinding I dispense everything into the portafilter or filter 
basket, when finished I use a brush to clean the chute and the doser, not 
perfect but works fine.  Don't be tempted to actually use the doser unless 
you are making espresso all day for 100 people.  It kills me to go into some 
hotel restaurant and see the grinder sitting there by the unused espresso 
machine with the doser full of stale ground coffee.  And they wonder why 
nobody is ordering espresso!
Have fun,
Ross

3) From: Ross
Carole,
I premeasure with a scoop (volume) of whole beans, works great, grind them 
all, clean the grinder.  As for the bean selection don't fret about it, try 
them all, flip a coin, get on with it until you find something you really 
like then get a burlap bag full.   The time to measure by weight is when you 
are being scientific about roasting (for small batches volume works fine 
too).   I have an assortment of plastic scoops, once I find a quantity of 
beans that I like for whatever I'm making I mark the scoop for that.  I have 
a double shot scoop in my current espresso jar it's a 60cc (about 4 
tablespoon) scoop and I fill it full or less than full depending~.  I use a 
slightly rounded 1/3 cup of beans for 6 cups about 26 to 28 fl oz drip etc, 
when coffee makers talk about a "cup" of coffee it can be anywhere from 4 to 
6 fl oz, so there you go.  Start with the recommendations and experiment 
from there.  I have the SM blue plastic 30cc/two tablespoon scoop that says 
use for 8 to 10 oz with 195 degree water, as you can see that's about 20% 
(hope we don't have any math majors on this list) fudge factor for 
individual taste.  It's the old measure with a micrometer and throw in an 
extra 20% for taste.  Don't get me wrong, it's good to be fairly exact about 
what you are doing as you get going so you compare apples to apples and when 
you start to strike gold you have a chance to replicate it, all I'm saying 
is volume will work fine.
Have fun,
Ross


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