HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Scent and Taste Training Kits (15 msgs / 272 lines)
1) From: Eddie Dove
Hello everyone ... my extended family!
Has anyone ever purchased, borrowed or otherwise procured and used a smell
or taste training kit?  I have seen them on the SCAA website and although I
think them a bit pricey, I am thinking that I may find them quite useful.
Input is appreciated and many thanks in advance.
Respectfully,
Eddie
-- 
Errare humanun est - sed perseverare diabolicum
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

2) From: Floyd Lozano
Given the descriptions i see of most of the specialty coffee places it seems
like the best way to 'train' is to raid your spice rack and fridge for
vanilla, anise, currant, tangerine, and also maybe your closet for leather,
tobacco, and for the lesser coffees, maybe the shoerack too.  I think
everyone has the capacity to taste these things - there aren't many people
with superpowers (john lee supertaster!), they just can recognize the things
they are tasting where most of us just taste the aggregate (yum good!) they
taste the individual components (oh yes, anise and starfruit, monkey hair
and aqua velvet finish).  I liken it to listening to music and saying 'good
tune' where someone else can actually discern what instruments are playing,
in what style, and the musical influences.  Or looking at a painting.  Don't
let me dissuade you - if you want to someday aspire to review coffees and
describe accurately the flavors you are tasting, then by all means, do what
you have to do!  I will happily point folks to your reviews!  I do think
sometimes it would be nice to identify what it is I am tasting though,
beyond 'wow that rocks' ;)
-F
On 2/24/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Eddie Dove
Floyd,
Your post is immensely invaluable to me.  I do want to write "it rocks",
which appeals to the audience and that which appeals to the more challenging
audience.  With your comment, "I will happily point folks to your reviews!",
II want to learn to make my reviews relevant to everyone!
Thank you for the input, it is greatly appreciated!
Eddie
On 2/25/07, Floyd Lozano  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From:
Eddie my love:
I would think with a small creature in your home the last thing you would need is a smell and tasting kit!!
ginny
---- Eddie Dove  wrote: 
<Snip>

5) From: Brett Mason
NOw that was good!
Brett
  RWA
On 2/25/07, pchforever  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

6) From: Coffeenut
My favorite part was where you could use some old shoes from the closet for
certain aroma training.  Would that be for the "funky" part of flavor
analysis?  Would you have to lick the shoes or would sniffing suffice?
:^)
Rick

7) From:
thanks RWA!!
---- Brett Mason  wrote: 
<Snip>

8) From: Tom Ulmer
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Floyd-
I am quite impressed that you got the hint of monkey hair. I think I passed
that one in between Blind Lemmon and Muddy Waters.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Floyd Lozano
Sent: Sunday, February 25, 2007 1:01 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Scent and Taste Training Kits
Given the descriptions i see of most of the specialty coffee places it seems
like the best way to 'train' is to raid your spice rack and fridge for
vanilla, anise, currant, tangerine, and also maybe your closet for leather,
tobacco, and for the lesser coffees, maybe the shoerack too.  I think
everyone has the capacity to taste these things - there aren't many people
with superpowers (john lee supertaster!), they just can recognize the things
they are tasting where most of us just taste the aggregate (yum good!) they
taste the individual components (oh yes, anise and starfruit, monkey hair
and aqua velvet finish).  I liken it to listening to music and saying 'good
tune' where someone else can actually discern what instruments are playing,
in what style, and the musical influences.  Or looking at a painting.  Don't
let me dissuade you - if you want to someday aspire to review coffees and
describe accurately the flavors you are tasting, then by all means, do what
you have to do!  I will happily point folks to your reviews!  I do think
sometimes it would be nice to identify what it is I am tasting though,
beyond 'wow that rocks' ;) 
-F

9) From:
Rick:
licking shoes? I can see where this thread is going. I really think Eddie did it on purpose!??
ginny
---- Coffeenut  wrote: 
<Snip>

10) From: Eddie Dove
Moi?
On 2/25/07, pchforever  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Jeff Oien
I would add smelly socks and an ashtray. Liquid Amber beans and
maybe the coffee without enough rest smells/tastes a little like this.
It's great as espresso and don't mean this in a bad way at all.
Java Prince beans smell like an ashtray to me. This is from the
strong tobacco notes. The coffee tastes a whole lot better and is
still one of my favorites.
JeffO
pchforever wrote:
<Snip>

12) From:
Jeff:
The last time my sister brought me the wild african coffee it tasted very much like tobacco, old pipe!!
ginny
---- Jeff Oien  wrote: 
<Snip>

13) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Eddie,
     I have been eying this up a long time as well. At last look, though I
realized that it is only an aroma (smell) kit. Is there a taste kit as well?
---Hello everyone ... my extended family!
Has anyone ever purchased, borrowed or otherwise procured and used a smell
or taste training kit?  I have seen them on the SCAA website and although I
think them a bit pricey, I am thinking that I may find them quite useful.
Input is appreciated and many thanks in advance.
Respectfully,
Eddie

14) From: Eddie Dove
Yes ... I saw a taste training kit on the SCAA web site too.
Eddie
On 2/25/07, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Errare humanun est - sed perseverare diabolicum
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

15) From: raymanowen
"...a taste training kit on the SCAA web site..."
I had a better one on the farms of Aunts, Uncles and Cousins in Illinois and
Iowa. I always looked forward to visits when I knew I was likely to get some
delicious fresh liver and onions a few hours out of the ground sauteed in
butter I sometimes helped churn.
I really had my taste buds looking forward to liver and onions, even as late
as high school. Then I made a Serious Blunder in the high school lunch line
once. I've never had good liver since. Maybe the onions...
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
No TLC- NO WAY!


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