HomeRoast Digest


Topic: People That Bring You Coffee (23 msgs / 603 lines)
1) From: Walter R. Basil
You know the ones. The ones that don't know the first thing about  
coffee, other than you must really like it. They bring you all kinds  
of coffee samples thinking they are doing you a favor. You graciously  
accept the offering and maybe brew it up so as no to waste coffee,  
regardless of origin, or just throw it in the round filing cabinet.  
They also are glad to share their web links with you that consist of  
folgers.com (I didn't Tom would mind this link... ;-) ) or the like.
Usually when people find out my coffee likings, I make it a point to  
tell them not to bring me anything, unless, you know, you happen go  
to Hawaii, and while here, happen to go into a roastery and buy some.  
Then you can give me some coffee. Well, someone did. They came to  
work today with a bag from the Kauai Coffee Company claiming to be  
Hawaii's largest coffee estate. It was bagged (and presumably roasted  
not much earlier) February 8 of this year. Unfortunately it was also  
ground that day. Oh well. It tasted all right. It had the definite  
taste of stale to it. Afterwards I brewed some of my Columbian Tolima  
Planadas to get the stale taste out of my mouth. MMMMmmmm. Right now  
I'm switching every quart of beans between NIcaragua FTO, Peru Norte  
Especial, and the Tolima. Nice contrasts.
Perhaps I need to add another stipulation that if they do happen upon  
Hawaii.... roastery.... blah blah blah... GET WHOLE BEANS! I was  
quite the gentleman though and acted shocked and happy. She did after  
all hunt down a roastery, and she hates coffee. So it was all for me!
--
Walter R Basil
www.basilweb.net

2) From: Robert Joslin
Your graciousness will rewarded.....but perhaps not in this life.
On 2/28/07, Walter R. Basil  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Jeff Oien
My dear great aunt has friends who live in Hawaii. When me and my wife 
were there for Christmas she asked if I like Kona coffee. I said yes, 
the real Kona-the good kind. She said, oh I have real Kona. It was the 
kind that's ground and vac sealed into a brick and it's decaf. It could 
be the 10% Kona type. Then she made it in the Mr. Coffee at 1/4 
strength. I couldn't tell her I like it because I don't like to lie but 
I said something like it tastes smooth or something like that.
She used to give this to me as a Christmas present before I was roasting 
my own. I didn't like it even back then.
She really likes it and it reminds her of her friends in Hawaii so 
that's what's important. I've given her mine and she liked it but I 
don't think she can tell the difference.
We're all ignorant about 99.99% of things in this world. Just not 
coffee. And I wonder about all the things I do that I have no idea about.
JeffO
Walter R. Basil wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Lynne Biziewski
Yeah, that reminded me of the visits my exboyfriend & I used to make to his
dear, sweet aunt & uncle. I never forgot the first time they asked us if we
wanted coffee. I wasn't roasting my own back then, but I've been a coffee
lover my whole life, and would search out what I felt was the best...
Oh, yes, I replied. His uncle proceeded to put a pot of water on, and his
aunt opened up a package of some sort of instant sweet coffee flavored
stuff.
I also hid my dismay. Mmm - thank you so much...
Lynne
On 2/28/07, Jeff Oien  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Les
Walter,
I used to be very snobbish about this problem.  However, I have had two
friends send me awesome coffee from great roasters in the Bay area.  These
will hold their own against anything we roast.  I am drinking an awesome
blend from one of those roasters right now.  Here is the deal, I think
homeroasters are raising the bar as to what is superior coffee.  I thought
that maybe I ought to order some of Tom's custom roast or some from my
friends.  Then when I see I can roast my own for often 1/3 the cost, I am
firmly committed to being a homeroaster again!  So lets be thankful for
those that are raising bar.  I had a church board meeting last night and one
of the guys poured me a cup of coffee that had come from the red can.  It
was amazing how I all of a sudden had to go to the bathroom.  In there I
avoided the middle man and came back with an empty cup.
Les
On 2/28/07, Lynne Biziewski  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Brett Mason
No doubt the middle man was very grateful too...
Regards,
Brett
  RWA
On 2/28/07, Les  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

7) From: Scott Marquardt
On 2/28/07, Walter R. Basil  wrote:
<Snip>
I'm facing some folks who love my coffee, then turn around and bring
one of those Dunkin' Donuts things full of coffee as a token of
reciprocation.   :-/
First, I'm not sure what to make of people who love my coffee AND the
Dunkin' stuff (I find its finish, among other things, horrid).
Accepting such praise may be a lot like being pleased to hear, in a
math class, that someone loves ALL numbers, and doesn't wish to
discriminate between them when answering the exam questions.
I think the most interesting thing, though, is the understandable
frugality of those who lament the prospect of throwing away a half bag
of stuff that LOOKS like coffee, after all, and smells at least
something like. It's the same common sense that leaves people stunned
when I tell them to throw away their perfectly new HP deskjets which,
having purchased on sale, cost less than their replacement cartridges.
"But it's a perfectly good printer!" "Yes, that's precisely why you
should throw it out; it will continue to reliably deplete your budget
for consumables."
Anyway, when it comes to stale ground coffee, I brook no nonsense to
the contrary of fact. And of course I justify it as tough love.  ;-)
- Scott

8) From: Leo Zick
I love dunking stuff in coffee and tea
Oh man such a nice treat!
Only works with creamed and sugared coffee 'drinks' though

9) From: Gregg Talton
I find it particularly funny when they bring me coffee (usually Brazil) and
want to talk about my homeroast - they always start with "what flavors do
you roast" or " I just love vanilla spice"  Aaaarrrrgggg.
Gregg
On 2/28/07, Walter R. Basil  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
They say such nice things about people at their funerals that it makes me
sad to realize that I'm going to miss mine by just a few days. - Garrison
Keillor

10) From: Larry Johnson
Tell them you roast Yellow Bourbon flavor. That ought to hold 'em for a
while. If it doesn't, then see what they think about Horse.
On 2/28/07, Gregg Talton  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J
"The truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it."
  - Flannery O'Connor

11) From: Brett Mason
This is so hard to pass up...
OK, I've gained composure.  Sounds like your colleagues just aren't
really thinking that well...
I like the Cinnamon-raisin myself.
Brett
  RWA
On 2/28/07, Gregg Talton  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

12) From: Slinkster
Scott Marquardt wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
When I first started spinning (that's the making of yarn from fuzz, not 
the riding of stationary bikes until one's bum wishes for a new owner) I 
tried to save and use every little bit of fuzz that came my way. 
Eventually I realized I was spending more time trying to make the fuzz 
spin-worthy than I was spending on the actual enjoyable spinning.  I'm 
quite ruthless now in my disposal practices: too much dirt, too many 
stickers, too much time forecasted to make the stuff spin-worth and out 
it goes.
I'm quite quick in chucking stale ground coffee but I have a hard time 
letting go of stale roasted beans.  I guess I need to adopt a form of my 
fuzz disposal practices to the bean...

13) From: Floyd Lozano
I used to loyally buy coffee (my wife did actually) from a local roaster
that moved out to the country and set up shop there.  They offered a few
types of coffees - columbia, costa rica, peru, etc.  Origin not defined.  9
bucks a lb roasted.  Decent cheap coffee.  Well, the problem was, the
quality was hit or miss.  I started getting more interested in coffee when I
watched an in-flight movie about the entire coffee process, called Black
Coffee (a BBC production I think, and I can't find it anywhere).  I started
drinking coffee from one of the people interviewed in the move, George
Howell.  It was quite good, quite a bit better than anything I had drunk
before, and expensive as all hell (15 bucks for 12 oz, thank you)
So, with all the research I started to do in quality coffee, I figured it
was time to see what all the buzz was about espresso.  I decided to buy a
NON STEAM espresso machine and see what real espresso was like.  I ended up
picking up a refurb Gaggia Evolution (because my wife would have emasculated
me if I told her I was going to buy a 300 or 500 dollar grinder and a 500
dollar espresso machine).  Well, the coffee I was making out of that was not
anything near what I was seeing or hearing about on all the websites and
truth to tell, I wasn't all that interested in figuring out how to make this
machine produce godlike coffee.  I decided to stick with drip coffee, which
was fine since I like it so much.
So after spending $50 on a 12 oz bag of a special rare cup of excellence
coffee from GH and drinking, and thinking 'you know, this isn't worth $50.
There has to be a better way'.  I somehow stumbled onto the Sweet Maria's
site.  I think I was looking for a roaster that carried an auction coffee I
had heard so much about, the Panama Esmeralda Gesha, and one of the folks
that had secured some was SMs.  Well, I knew I had found heaven.  Look at
all the coffees!   One hitch - I had to ROAST them myself!  I read, and
read, and finally decided, what the hell, a Fresh Roast 8 is not that
expensive, i mean, that's 2 bags of the other coffee that didn't impress
me!  Fast forward, now I roast only occasionally in the FR8 and have moved
on to the dogbowl, and loving every cup I don't screw up ;)  All of which I
have related because of the way this journey has changed my thinking
regarding coffee and everything else.  I wouldn't throw away anything,
coffee or otherwise, if it wasn't visibly rotten, that would be a waste,
right?  One year later, I'll throw out anything that doesn't 'cup' well, be
it coffee, slightly stale bread, soda from the cupboard that sat around long
enough to start to taste 'tinny', whatever.  I am in fact throwing out a bag
of Kenyan from George Howell because it's sat around too long (and waiting
patiently to see what Kenyans we get this year).   Change is good!
On 2/28/07, Slinkster  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Scott Marquardt
On 2/28/07, Larry Johnson  wrote:
<Snip>
That's actually pretty funny.
But here's the other problem -- the pervasiveness of the "consumer
mindset" for some things. Despite, I think, a lot of people realizing
the importance of "slow food" even if they've never heard of the
movement, there are some commodities -- and that's probably the
problem -- that people just don't put on the DIY side of the
consumer/producer divide. Because rice isn't generally cultivated in
Denver, folks there aren't going to imagine themselves hulling it. And
because coffee isn't cultivated in Cleveland, no one's going to
imagine themselves roasting it.
What this eventuates is the notion that craft roasters can be a bit
eccentric, and therefore their roasts suspect. Which is of course non
sequitur: "I won't trust the handyman next door to fix my plumbing --
just an anonymous company that'll send me a whole new mobile home that
doesn't require any of this dubious amateur tinkerin'."    ;-)
- S

15) From: Les
Floyd,
Thanks for sharing your journey.  I am going to be a sneaky snob this week.
I have been snapping my Mazzer Major to relieve the grounds that are there
in the morning before I vacuum and grind for the day.  I have collected 2
yogurt containers of grinds.  It has maybe 20 varietals.  It is stale I am
sure, but I am going to bring it to church Sunday to brew.  It will be
interesting to see what the folks think!
Les
On 2/28/07, Floyd Lozano  wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Floyd,
     This is an awesome film. If you are already an amazon member in the U.S.,
just use your same login info. Been meaning to share this with the list,
just been too busy to get around to it. Highly recommended!http://www.amazon.ca/Black-Coffee/dp/B000GJ0LDQ/ref=pd_ka_1/702-7303259-5288804?ieF8&s=dvd---I started getting more interested in coffee when I
watched an in-flight movie about the entire coffee process, called Black
Coffee (a BBC production I think, and I can't find it anywhere).

17) From: Leo Zick
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
george howell makes some good coffes, typically rated in the mid 90s  
From: Floyd Lozano [mailto:fplozano] 
Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2007 11:42 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +People That Bring You Coffee
I used to loyally buy coffee (my wife did actually) from a local roaster
that moved out to the country and set up shop there.  They offered a few
types of coffees - columbia, costa rica, peru, etc.  Origin not defined.  9
bucks a lb roasted.  Decent cheap coffee.  Well, the problem was, the
quality was hit or miss.  I started getting more interested in coffee when I
watched an in-flight movie about the entire coffee process, called Black
Coffee (a BBC production I think, and I can't find it anywhere).  I started
drinking coffee from one of the people interviewed in the move, George
Howell.  It was quite good, quite a bit better than anything I had drunk
before, and expensive as all hell (15 bucks for 12 oz, thank you)  
 
So, with all the research I started to do in quality coffee, I figured it
was time to see what all the buzz was about espresso.  I decided to buy a
NON STEAM espresso machine and see what real espresso was like.  I ended up
picking up a refurb Gaggia Evolution (because my wife would have emasculated
me if I told her I was going to buy a 300 or 500 dollar grinder and a 500
dollar espresso machine).  Well, the coffee I was making out of that was not
anything near what I was seeing or hearing about on all the websites and
truth to tell, I wasn't all that interested in figuring out how to make this
machine produce godlike coffee.  I decided to stick with drip coffee, which
was fine since I like it so much.   
 
So after spending $50 on a 12 oz bag of a special rare cup of excellence
coffee from GH and drinking, and thinking 'you know, this isn't worth $50.
There has to be a better way'.  I somehow stumbled onto the Sweet Maria's
site.  I think I was looking for a roaster that carried an auction coffee I
had heard so much about, the Panama Esmeralda Gesha, and one of the folks
that had secured some was SMs.  Well, I knew I had found heaven.  Look at
all the coffees!   One hitch - I had to ROAST them myself!  I read, and
read, and finally decided, what the hell, a Fresh Roast 8 is not that
expensive, i mean, that's 2 bags of the other coffee that didn't impress me!
Fast forward, now I roast only occasionally in the FR8 and have moved on to
the dogbowl, and loving every cup I don't screw up ;)  All of which I have
related because of the way this journey has changed my thinking regarding
coffee and everything else.  I wouldn't throw away anything, coffee or
otherwise, if it wasn't visibly rotten, that would be a waste, right?  One
year later, I'll throw out anything that doesn't 'cup' well, be it coffee,
slightly stale bread, soda from the cupboard that sat around long enough to
start to taste 'tinny', whatever.  I am in fact throwing out a bag of Kenyan
from George Howell because it's sat around too long (and waiting patiently
to see what Kenyans we get this year).   Change is good! 
On 2/28/07, Slinkster  wrote: 
Scott Marquardt wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
When I first started spinning (that's the making of yarn from fuzz, not 
the riding of stationary bikes until one's bum wishes for a new owner) I
tried to save and use every little bit of fuzz that came my way.
Eventually I realized I was spending more time trying to make the fuzz 
spin-worthy than I was spending on the actual enjoyable spinning.  I'm
quite ruthless now in my disposal practices: too much dirt, too many
stickers, too much time forecasted to make the stuff spin-worth and out 
it goes.
I'm quite quick in chucking stale ground coffee but I have a hard time
letting go of stale roasted beans.  I guess I need to adopt a form of my
fuzz disposal practices to the bean...

18) From: Brett Mason
Thurston Howell III is particularly known for his Island Coffees as
well.  I was rather surprised to not see them listed on Tom's
"Islands" section...
Regards,
Brett
  RWA
On 3/1/07, Leo Zick  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

19) From: Leo Zick
its b/c they cant find him to buy any. but i hear he roasts in a  
washing machine operated by an exercise bike.
Quoting Brett Mason :
<Snip>
 9
<Snip>
n I
<Snip>
ed
<Snip>
up
<Snip>
ted
<Snip>
not
<Snip>
his
<Snip>
ch
<Snip>
.
<Snip>
 I
<Snip>
me!
<Snip>
to
<Snip>
e
<Snip>
e
<Snip>
,
<Snip>
to
<Snip>
yan
<Snip>
y
<Snip>

20) From: Robert Pearce
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Only one of those in the whole US according to Amazon, and it's used.  =(  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jeremy DeFranco
Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2007 10:36 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +People that bring you coffee
Floyd,
     This is an awesome film. If you are already an amazon member in the
U.S., just use your same login info. Been meaning to share this with the
list, just been too busy to get around to it. Highly recommended!http://www.amazon.ca/Black-Coffee/dp/B000GJ0LDQ/ref=pd_ka_1/702-7303259-5288804?ieF8
 &s=dvd
---I started getting more interested in coffee when I 
watched an in-flight movie about the entire coffee process, called Black
Coffee (a BBC production I think, and I can't find it anywhere).

21) From: Leo Zick
so buy it and share the wealth. ;-)
Quoting Robert Pearce :
<Snip>
(
<Snip>
o
<Snip>
5288
<Snip>
-528
<Snip>

22) From: L. Michael Fraley, MD
Are we going to have to ask that all "Spew Warning" posts have SW in 
the heading?  I am just saying.......
Michael
On Mar 1, 2007, at 8:57 AM, Brett Mason wrote:
Thurston Howell III is particularly known for his Island Coffees as
well.  I was rather surprised to not see them listed on Tom's
"Islands" section...
Regards,
Brett
  RWA
On 3/1/07, Leo Zick  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

23) From: Mejia, Carlos
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I have a coworker who is going to Brazil this weekend (Southern..near
Sao Paulo).  I told him I would love some green beans if he happens to
see any :-).   I was recently in Puerto Vallarta and found a wonderful
coffee shop where the owner was roasting in the back room.  I wanted to
bring some green beans back and he was willing to sell me some but said
"how will you get them through customs?"   I did a quick web search and
the US Customs site actually said something along the lines of
...roasted coffee OK, green coffee NO.  However, when I came back into
the U.S. (Pheonix) the guy in customs said it would have been fine.
 
Two questions: does anyone know about bringing beans back into the U.S.
customs?    Any specific green beans I should ask my friend to seek out?
 
~carlos


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